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Full text of "Marhiscan (1980)"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Special Eve 


nts 


1-19 


Sports 




20-47 


Academics 




48-81 


Activities 




82-107 


People 




108-165 


Ads 




166-177 


Index 




178-181 


Closing the 


Year 


182-184 




I 



PATRIOT 
PRIDE 



It began with a lot of people . . . stu- 
dents like you and me ... we wanted to 
stand out. 

What was taking place was an under- 
standing. We were more than just a 
group. We were special and we could 
achieve our goals. 

First came our sports program. Our 
athletes trained long and hard to give it 
their best shot. With determination 
such as this we came home with swim- 
ming trophies, city baseball title, and 
third in the state in the class AAA foot- 
ball division. These were achievements 
that we, as Patriots, could be proud of. 

Patriot pride was a custom among 
Marshall's student body. The special 
quality that sets us apart is more of an 
understanding; a kind of unwritten law. 
In fact, it could be our own way— our 
own "Marshall Law." 



by Pam Lloyd 
Kathy Weir 



Football pride doesn't just include the boy's 
team; not to be forgotten is the senior girl's pow- 
derpufT teams Goffinet's Baugh Girls and Bonfil's 
Beauties. 

The victorious varsity baseball team knows they're 
number one which just goes to show Patriot pride 
means athletic achievement. 

Our cheerleaders are leading the way we show our 
school pride to the Indianapolis community. 

Vice-principal, Fred Jones, congratulates Chris 
Pritchett and his team members on a great 
season. 




2/Theme 




Theme/3 






ACADEMIC 

EXCELLENCE 
A 

^^\ cademically, intensive study along 
with diligence in work brought superior 
ity to Marshall. Our CAT tests refle< I 
our hard work, Mar nest 

school average of all of the Indianapolis 
Public Schools. Students competed in 
contests such as Bosch and Lomb 
Science Fair, Rose-Hulman Math D 

n County Press D 
brought back av. it now h 

proudly in our showi 

Taking orphans to the zoo and col- 
lecting canned foods for the needy, 
gave the community respect for our 
school. Music ensembles travelled to 
nursing and convalescent homes during 
the holidays to bring cheer to those 
without 
Marshall that we Patriots can be proud 

Hard work and training . academic 
excellence . . . and caring. These are the 
laws that we Patriots abide by. The un- 
written law Marshall Law 

by Pam Lloyd and 
Kathy V. 



on the victorious te 

Although the sophomore float entry didn't come 
in first, it ■ winner with the th( 

Home of the Pa 

Pipino demon' I 'nent 

to help his class in .■ Me goal of acaii' 

excellence. 

The music dep.ii' always been r ii 

imple of I de. Here S' 

omores Joyce Henry and 1 
Concert Choir 




4 Theme 



Mattress Mania 



"O 



nee Upon a Mattress" was 
the spring musical last year. The play, 
a comedy about a medieval castle and 
its search for a princess who was "good 
enough, smart enough, rich enough and 
bright enough", was a hilarious success. 

Jennifer Chapman played Queen Ag- 
gravain, an over protective mother who 
refused any girl her son chose to marry, 
and Dion Wolf played King Sextimus a 
maiden-chasing mute who got his say in 
the end. 

Dauntless, the young prince was por- 
trayed brilliantly by Mike Mulcahy and 
his chosen bride, though his mother 
forbade, was princess Winifred, u Fred 
for short" played by Tami Prunty. 

David Jordan gave an excellent per- 
formance as the minstrel who tried his 

The mellow voice of senior David Jordan as the 
Minstrel sang the introduction to the audience. 

Hopelessly in love Prince Dauntless, portrayed by 
Mike Mulcahy, asks Princess Winnifred to be his 
wife. 

Directors Jan Eberle, Cynthia Featheringill and 
Jerry Hurst give the cast their final rehearsal prep 
session. 



best to help in any way he could; al- 
though, when the Jester played by Nick 
Hopkins joined him in this plight it often 
ended in even more trouble. Mark 
Brown, the Wizard, an old magician, 
who, along with the Queen, tried to de- 
stroy Fred's chance to become princess 
and marry Dauntless, thus setting off 
the law and allowing the entire kingdom 
to marry. 

The musical was done in two acts and 
was beautifully choreographed by Kelle 

leyer. The directors of the play were 
Janet Eberle, Cindy Featheringill and 
Jerry Hurst. The stage manager was 
Paul Justice and orchestra was re- 
hearsed by Raymond Brandes. 



6/Musicals 





Prince Dauntless 

Princess Winnifred 

King Sextimus 

Queen Aggravain 

Sir Harry 

Lady Larken 

Minstrel 

Jester 

Wizard 

Princess # 12 

Lady Rowena 

Lady Merrill 

Lady Lucille 

Mabelle 

Luce's Lady 

Lady Elizabeth 

Lady Martha 

Lady Anne 

Lady Beatrice 

Mightingale of Samarkand 

Sir Studley 

Sir Luce 

Sir Richard 

Sir Gareth 

Sir John 

Sir Henry 

Sir Edward 

Sir Harold 



Mike Mulcahy 
Tami Prunty 
Dion Wolfe 
Jennifer Chapman 
Chip Jacobs 
Kim Couse 
David Jordan 
Nick Hopkins 
Mark Brown 
Linda Marten 
Debbie Ponto 
Cindy Lutocka 
Linda Weiglein 
Lynne Royce 
Chris White 
Lisa Stevens 
Teresa Dillon 
Mary Crouch 
Kellee Meyer 
Lisa Reed 
Mark Opel 
Gary Davis 
Brian Martin 
Randy Smith 
Robbie Young 
Clint Gasaway 
Clark Gamble 
John Adams 





Fred tries her best to get to sleep but finds it dif- 
ficult, for there is a pea under her bed of mat- 
tresses. 

The troublesome trio of the Court Jester, the King 
and the Minstrel get together to make a hilarious 
comedy team. 

Backstage work is as important as that on stage. 
A member of the chorus gets made up for the 
performance. 



REST OF CAST 



Knights: Kevin Royce, Mark Goff, Jeff Prunty, Butch Stone, Jim 

Dodds, Pete Riley, Randy Williams, Tony Hoskins, Pat Royce. 

Handmaidens: Cindy Breeden, Tracie Tarter, Sheila Griffin, Donna 
Chalupa, Sandy Pease, Robin Bottorff. 

Ladies-in-waiting: Kim Cole, Carole Terry, Carol Williams, Michelle 
Ranee, Tanya Erickson, Marie Scheibelhut, Jane Riley, Jean 
Terry, Kristie Hutzler, Stephanie Jones, Dana Creek. 



Musicals/7 



Patriots Burn Blue Devils 



A 



Ithough October 12 was a blust- 
ery cold night, it didn't stop Patriot ' 
from attending the 13th annual Home- 
coming against the Shortridge Blue 
Devils. 

Homecoming spirit week went well 
beginning with discovery day and ending 
with dress-up and flower day. 

After the National Anthem, many i 
cited fans awaited the kickoff . Unfor 
nately, there weren't many v Ridge fans. 

Halftime was a great success with all 
the unusual floats. The winner of the 
float competition was the class of '81, 
with the slogan "The Shortridge Blue 
Devils are never-ready, but the JMHS 




are every-read\ 
Next, the Homecoming Que< 

were paraded around thr track in 
the T-topped cars until they i 
er field. The stadium bei 
hushed befor* inally announced 

Kerry Hallam, the Homecoming Queen 
'79. 
( inally, the ' ent counc 

fireworks were set off which I 
dents had contributed generousK 
Homecoming ended in a victory I 
its, with the score IV ' 22- 

Shc>' 14. 

by Doneva Wheeler 




14 

Marshall 
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8/ Homecoming 





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Turning Tables of Tradition 



raditionally, it has been proper for 
the boy to ask the girl out. However, 
every spring Marshall turns the tables of 
tradition and has a dance especially for 
the girl to have a chance to ask out her 
favorite guy. 

Although the turnabout was its usual 
success, the specialty of having the din- 
ner included with the dance made it 
even more popular. This extra addition 
did hike up the price of the ticket; how- 
ever, it proved to be well worth the ex- 



10/Dances 



pense, said most couples. 

Disc jockey Sunny Moon spun the 
records that couples danced to from 
seven to twelve o'clock on the Sheraton 
Inn East dance floor. 

Jill Stephenson, chairman of the 
dance, said she was most pleased about 
the capacity turn-out at our first dinner 
dance. 

By Pam Lloyd 




Graduate Mike Walenga "gets down" on the 
dance floor of the Sheraton Inn East with his 
date Jennifer Klutey. 

Graduates Don Inman and Renee Lacy dance to 
the music played by D.J. Sunny Moon at the 
twelfth annual Turnabout Dance. 

Graduate Jeff Bowlby and seniors Randy Lang- 
ford and Keith Jones get an eyeful and discuss 
how "nice" everyone looks. 



Dances/ 11 



A Night 
for Dancing 



tt 



A 



Iways and Forever", prom 
night, a night to be remembered. A night 
for dancing, being with friends, and 
being at your school prom, drew many 
Patriots to the prom. 

Many patriotic juniors and seniors 
crowded enthusiastically into the 500 
Ballroom at the Convention Center. The 
theme was carried over by roses at each 
table. Each couple received a cham- 
pagne glass to help them remember the 
"78-"79 Junior-Senior Prom. Senior 
counselor Roger Schroeder was spon- 
sor. 

The traditional balloon-popping cere- 
mony was carried out at midnight. Each 
attending student then received a 
brand-new, 1979 penny. 

by Jill Wetzel 





Prom queen Becky Miller and her date Mike Lett 
dance the traditional theme dance to "Always and 
Forever". 



Senior Terry Cobb does some heavy disco dancing 
at the twelfth annual junior-senior prom. 



The band at the prom provided many different 
kinds of music for the couples when they finally 
arrived. 



12/Prom 




Prom/13 



To Rome— With Latin Club 



o 



ne of the most spectacular 
events that the Latin Club participated 
in was the trip to Italy. It took $750, 
$350 came from selling candy, cheese, 
and sausage. The rest of the expenses 
were paid by the parents of the students. 
The total of the expense was more than 
$1000. 

The students who went were Mike 
Scott, Steve Barnes, Mark Pauley, 
Glenna Bowers and Linda Brooks. Miss 
Helen Bailey sponsored the students. 

The first city visited was Rome. Dur- 
ing the four days at Rome, the students 
visited some ruins of Tivoli. Within the 
next four days they toured Naples, 



Pompeii, Sorrento, and the beautiful Is- 
land of Capri. 

Students got pleasure from the dif- 
ferent types of transportation that was 
available to them. When they left In- 
dianapolis, a plane took them to New 
York. After their four-day stay in Rome, 
a train transported them to Naples. An- 
other pleasurable way of transportation 
was a boat, which transported them 
from Sorrento to Capri. 

With the help of Miss Bailey's fluency 
of the Latin language, she was able to 
communicate with the Italians which 
made the trip more informative and 
comfortable. 





The beautiful fountains of Rome are sights to be 
remembered. The Spanish Steps, The Coliseum 
and Italian islands were toured. 

These are five of the six lucky people that visited 
Italy with the Latin Club sponsored by Miss Helen 
Bailey. 



14/Trips 




St. Louis— Bird's 



Eye View 



w 



hat's so interesting about St. 
Louis? Well just ask any history club 
member and you will get your answer. 

Thirty three members of the history 
club visited St. Louis May third through 
the fifth. They all sold candy to help cut 
expenses. The sponsor of the outing was 
Mr. John Allen. Miss Janet Eherle and 
Miss Marvolene Nicholson chaperoned. 

The history clubbers did everything 
from swimming in a pool to talking to 
Indians at a museum. 

They also went to the top of the Arch, 
"which was pretty scary" explained one 
history clubber. They visited the animals 
at the St. Louis zoo. The exciting trip 
ended Saturday after an exhausting day 
at Six Flags. 

by Julie Mittman and Linda Moore 

Along with going to Six Flags the History Club 
visited the Jefferson National Expansion Memo- 
rial which represents the gateway to the west. 

There they are together— "The History Clubber 
Huggers" on their way to St. Louis with sponsor 
John Allen. The trip featured the pioneer gate- 
way. 




Trips/15 




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Seeing wildlife such as this alligator is the main 
objective of the zoology students on their Okeefe- 
nokee trip. 



The Smokey Mountains at sunset is certainly a 
beautiful sight to see; especially, when you sleep 
under the stars. 

Captain Lisa Hayse leads her crew through the 
eerie 'Fenokee Swamp. Lisa was president of the 
Naturalist's. 



16/Trips 




Classroom Applies to Real Life 



L 



ook at the size of that x gator!" 
yells Jamie Fish. "It's coming toward 
us!" screamed one of the girls. 

Actually, according to the Okeefe- 
nokee Park guide, "they're more fright- 
ened of you." Seeing the wildlife in the 
Okee swamp is a major reason Mar- 
shall's zoology students take this trip 
each spring. 

Going down on the train is almost as 
much fun as the swamp trek. Adding to 
their life bird list and identifying trees, 
shrubs and flowers reinforce their class- 
room work. 

The Smokey Mountains trip has as 
it's primary goal, new specimens for 
Botany students. "It's always a fifty- 



fifty chance that we'll be hiking in a 
snow storm," says Mr. David Otto. The 
students actually camp in primitive cab- 
ins and get to practice pioneer skills. 

Both of these trips are only part of 
the outdoor lab work offered by the 
science department as it continually 
tries to get student's theoretical class- 
room work matched with real-life expe- 
riences. This is the opportunity for all 
those assignments about leaves, insects 
and birds to be used. 

In spite of the sunburns and other in- 
conveniences, these trips are great be- 
cause of the opportunity for many stu- 
dents to be independent and have fun 
with their peers. 




Birds such as this Barred Owl are seen on trips 
which help the students add to their life bird list. 

Here the hikers are ready to go hike down the 
Smokeys. The botany students look for different 
specimens to bring back and study. 



Trips/ 17 



Humanities in Never Land 



o 



n August 2, the summer school 
Humanities class performed the musical 
Peter Pan. Under the direction of Cy- 
nthia Featheringill and Janet Eberle, 
the class worked about four weeks on 
the play itself and about four weeks on 
the theater in general. Although the 
major goal of the class is to put on the 
musical, it also helps the students to 
learn the basics of theater. It teaches a 
little about acting, music, and the tech- 
nical aspects of a production. 

The cast of "Peter Pan" had hoped 
to perform the musical again in Sep- 
tember, but due to the teacher's strike, 
plans were changed. 



"Peter Pan" is not the first summer 
musical that Marshall has produced. 
Last summer the Humanities class put 
on "You're A Good Man Charlie 
Brown". "Charlie Brown" was put on 
twice once in early August, and again in 
early September. The musical for next 
year has not been decided, and prob- 
ably won't be until the class starts in 
June. The play depends on the size of 
the cast available. If the cast is large, 
then the play will probably be a chil- 
dren's play. If the cast is small then the 
play could possibly be the musical "Fan- 
tastiks". 

By Randy Smith 





Tinkerbell (Martha Riley) gives Peter Pan (Brian 
Glotfelty) some pixie dust as Wendy (Priscilla Eric- 
son), John (Jane Riley) and Michael (Kathy Crowell) 
look on. 

Tinkerbell was played by Martha Riley. Martha did 
an excellent job in learning lines and actions. 



18/Musicals 





John (Jane Riley) and Michael (Kathy Crowell) try to 
persuade Wendy (Pnscilla Ericson) to let them play 
when they're supposed to be in bed. 

Peter Pan (Brian Glotfelty) and Captain Hook (Randy 
Smith) fight to the end to determine the Darling 
Children's fate. 



Musicals/ 19 



A 



Marshall Law 
in Sports 



thletically, Marshall did very well 
this year and made the Patriots proud 
of them. The athletic department gives 
Marshall students a wide variety to 
choose from in activities. It gives the 
jocks good experience so someday, 
some of them may even turn profes- 
sional. The sporting events are not only 
good for the athletes, they are good for 
the other students as well. It gives the 
students a place to unwind. A chance to 
work off the tensions and hassles of ev- 
eryday life. 

The girls basketball team improved greatly over 
last year's team. Coach John Allen helped the 
team-a lot, too. 

Trent Paisley, Elvin Sanders, Tony Bailey, and 
Marvin Howard celebrate after winning the fresh- 
man relay at Tech. 

Even the guys on the sidelines are ecstatic as the 
Pats score another one for the red, white and 
blue. 

Darrell Carey goes up for the jump ball in Friday 
night action as the ref looks on. 



20/Sports 





Sports/21 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL:-Top Row: Dutch Clark, Mark Fisher, Alan Griffin, 
Jerry Jones, Mike Hammond, Billy Rosenstihl, Robert Marsdan, Michael 
Kelly. Second Row: Tony Leach, David Killebrew, Richard Alexander, Lance 



Lambirth, Steve Mcintosh, John Charleston, Coach Porter. Steve Street, 
Mike Garrod, Rusty McCall, Danny Gruner, Curtis Pinner, Kevin Kelli, Jim 
Moffit. 




Keith Jones, carrying the ball, averts the defense 
for another record setting win for the goal line. 
Keith was elected to the all-city team. 



"Catch the Pepsi Feeling" is just what Jonathon 
Scott is thinking as he downs a cold drink during 
fourth quarter action. 



22/Footbal' 



Stephen Williams anxiously awaits the motion of 
the opposing offense so he can attempt to thwart 
another first down. 




Top Rated Triple A Pats 



jl he Varsity Football season ended 
with a crowd and a bang as the Patriots 
rolled over Roncalli 25-0 to complete an 
8-2 record. The one time top-ten-rated 
triple A team was coached by Ed Bopp, 
Lenny Brickens, John Veza ; and Bill 
Baugh. Pat Bonfils was the trainer. 

Head Coach Bopp stated, "Our best 
game offensively was Lawrence North 
because we had our offense moving and 
scored the most points. Defensively it 
would be Lawrence Central since we 
held them for the least points." 

The team started out slowly and 
boomed into a great year. Many new 
players were introduced as the team's 
spirit complimented veteran. Seniors 
were Keith Jones, with a career of ten 
100-yard rushing games, and a career 
2,665; Jerry Hawkins, Jonathon Scott, 
Jim White, Matt Schlimgen, Stephan 
Williams, Aaron Pate, Mark and Mike 
Jarosinski, Randy Langford, and Paul 
Houston. Juniors were Bill Wolf, William 



Yarbrough, Tony Allen, and Tony Wash- 
ington displayed varied talents. Out- 
standing sophomores Steve Miller and 
Gerald Lewis proved themselves varsity 
material. Tight end Lewis caught well 
from Miller, the quarterback. 

A high caliber defense shut out four 
teams, Lawrence Central, Howe, Cathe- 
dral and Roncalli to prove Pats are al- 
ways tough. Eighteen interceptions re- 
placed the old record for total team 
interceptions. Stephan Williams led in 
these with six for the season. The de- 
fense held opponents with up to 69 op- 
posing points, a new record. William 
Yarbrough led tackles followed by Jona- 
thon Scott. 

Many seniors left the team and will 
greatly be missed, but the Patriot spirit 
will rise again to face next season with 
renewed strength according to coaches. 

by David Mogollon/ Photos by Stewart, 
Powell, Tower 




VARSITY FOOTBALL- Bottom Row: Tim Daugherty, Mike Jarosinski, Randy 
Lanfgord, Jerry Hawkins, Keith Jones, Jim White, Aaron Pate, Arnold Jack- 
son, Stephen Williams. Second Row: John Nelson, Ed Phelps, Wayne Brad- 
ford, Mark Jarosinski, Jonathan Scott, Paul Huston, Bill Wolf, Jonathan 
Adaway. Third Row. Joe Knudsen, Bob Jennings, Jim McCall, Gerald Lewis, 
Steve Blanche, Anthony Allen, Tony Allen, Larry Jacob, Chris Agee. Fourth 
Row: William Yarbrough, Steve Miller, Tony Washington, Mark Osborne, Jeff 
Fisher, Thomas Murphy, Joel Jones, Russell McCord. Fifth Row: Mike 



Harder, Marvin Howard, Ed Murrell, James Finch, Bryant Ingram, Elvin 
Sanders, Kendall Flemings. Sixth Row: Jay Whitis, Ron Benson, Rick Teal, 
Mike McCurry, Rob Graves, Keith Williams, Garland Davis. Seventh Row: Eli 
Garza, Aaron Jackson, Mark Beard, Scott Ranger. Top Row: Coach Bopp, 
Coach Veza, Coach Baugh, Coach Brickens. Not Pictured: Dave Jordan, Matt 
Schlimgen, Tyrone Curry, Chuck Lacy, Tony Bailey, Brad Davis, Greg Patrick, 
Kent Johnson, and Dave Anderson. Football/23 



McCall Gets 



To State Meet 



D 



espite getting off to a slow start 
Coach Life and Coach Porter instructed 
the grapplers to a 9-6-1 finish. Mar- 
shall's only tie came in the last match of 
the season against Chatard. 

This year the wrestling team con- 
sisted of only six seniors, one junior and 
six sophomores. Keith Jones, 165; 
Randy Lanford 155; Rick Fenter, 98; 
Jeff Shriver, 126; Nick Tuttle, 145; and 
Paul Houston, 177, were the only se- 
niors on the clubs roster. The soph- 
omores included Steve Shriver, 105; 
Larry Hall, 112; Mark Beard, 119; Rich 
Gentry, 132; Eli Garza, 185, and heavy- 
weight Bryant Ingram. The only junior 
was Jimmy McCall, 135, who also went 
all the way to the state tourney. 

The Pats were fifth in the city 
tourney, just being edged out of fourth. 
Individually four grapplers finished 
third. They were seniors Randy Lang- 
ford with a record of 14-2; Keith Jones, 
14-2; and Paul Houston, 13-3. One 
sophomore also contributed, Larry Hall, 
11-5. 

Next year will really be a rebuilding 
season having six returning sophomores 
and one returning junior. 

by Chuck Lacy/ Photos Smith 




t 




\ 



These two wrestlers are maneuvering for position. 
The other one will try to pin the other. 



These two wrestlers are stretching to avoid take 
downs. A take down is worth points. 



24/Wrestling 




♦ ttUft r» 




TJ 

A 



* 



This is the start of the wrestling match. Wrestlers 
try to escape to gain points. 

In wrestling this hold is a very strategic one. No 
one has the advantage here. 





Wrestling/24 



That's Greg Agee in the middle of that dust cloud 
Several bad throws by opponents meant Pat runs. 




Scoring another one for the red, white, and blue 
is Chris Pritchett, Patriot pitcher. 



26/Baseball 



Tremain Leaves, Spirit Goes On 

i 



he enthusiasm and spirit of the 
students as well as the varsity baseball 
team led Marshall to a 22-4 record go- 
ing all the way to semi-state before 
being stopped by the Belmont Braves. 
They finished in the top six. Coached by 
Bob Tremain, David Clapp, and Brad 
Goffinett, the team held a 310 batting 
average. 

Great pitching, which won many 
games, could be attributed to three 
players— Brent Van Duyn, south paw, 



Chris Pritchett, senior hurler, and 
Steve Hicks, the number one relief 
pitcher in the state. Hicks was voted 
most valuable player for most games 
saved with a .049 earned run average. 
"There were a lot of tough and well 
played games. The regionals champion- 
ship with Greenfield Central was one," 
said David Clapp. In that game VanDuyn 
pitched a two hitter. Robert Davids led 
batting with a .432 average. He and Jim 
Ackerman were the lead in base stea- 



lers. 

Seniors Steve Hicks, Chris Pritchett, 
Greg Agee and Paul Huston have gradu- 
ated from the team, as has Coach Bob 
Tremain who left after six great years. 
He went to Indiana Central University 
as head coach of the baseball team 
there. All of these team members will 
be missed. 

by David Mogollon 





Back Row: David Clapp, Robert Davids, Landon 
McBride, Greg Agee, Steve Hicks, Jimmy Acker- 
man, Tim Daugherty, Bob Tremain. Front Row: 
Brent VanDuyn, Randy Langford, Chris Pritchett, 
Jim Huston, Eddie Parrot, Scott Holden, Keith 
Jones. 

Robert Davids prepares at second as Chris Prit- 
chett winds up. Concentration is part of the 
game. 



Baseball/27 



Pats 

Improve 

Record 

I alent was evenly distributed on the 
varsity basketball team as they slam- 
dunked their way to an improved record 
of 9-11. Coach Roger Schroder stated, 
"We have more ability this year, basi- 
cally more talent." 

There wasn't a "number one" or to- 
tally outstanding player, but the team 
did have its prominent players as seen 
in the athletic qualities of Eric McKay, 
Mike Arnold and Gerald Lewis. McKay 
ran up a 20-point game average and 
snagged 36 rebounds by the ninth game 
of the season, while Arnold held the 
lead in steals and assists at nine and 20. 

Members of the team included Mike 
Arnold, Darrell Carey, Landon McBride, 
Eric McKay, Gerald Lewis, Houston 
Mills, Thomas Majors, Erik Harrison, 
Leroy Leach, Jerome Myricks, Chris Wi- 
ther, Dana May and Richard Robinson. 
McBride, McKay, and Lewis were the 
returning lettermen. 

The team next year will be soundly 
anchored by veterans McKay and Lewis. 

by Dave Mogollon 





JV TEAM- Bottom Row: David Members, Ron Gilbert, Andre Hatchett, Leon Torrence, James Johnson, 
Jerry Anderson, Kendall Flemings. Top Row: Coach Roger Schroder, William Yarbrough, Ron Benson, 
Keith Shanklin, Scott Turner, Floyd Houston, Steve Reid, Coach Bill Baugh. 



It's a battle for the ball, but Darrell Carey finally 
sinks it. The rebounding strength of Marshall im- 
proved a great deal this year. 



28/ Basketball 




FRESHMAN TEAM-Bottom Row: Joe Jacobs, 
Michael Kelly, Gerald Reed, Dwayne Smith, Der- 
rick Spike, Jerry Jones, Bucky Byrd, Anthony Gas- 
ton, Mike Martin. Top Row: Coach John Veza, 
Roy Smith, John Charleston, Efrem Terrell, Mi- 
chael Chanault, Tony Leach, Steve McWilliams, 
Adrian Gilbert, John Johnson, Kevin Burris, Jeff 
Wilson, Coach Rick Harper. 




VARSITY TEAM-Bottom Row: Stephan Williams, Chris White, Dianne 
Swineford, Missy Miller, Varinia Nevilles, Lisa Greenwald, Julie VonBurg, 
Karen Ginger, Pat Mobley. Second Row: Coach Roger Schroder, Leroy 
Leech, Eric Harrison, Eric McKay, Darrell Carey, Richard Robinson, Tony 



Majors. Coach Rick Harper. Top Row: Coach Bill Baugh, Houston Mills, Ger- 
ald Lewis, Michael Arnold, Chris Withers, Landon McBride, Jerome Myricks, 
Coach John Veza. 



Basketball/ 29 



Girls Just Miss Sectional Victory 



he girls basketball team had a very 
exciting season. Monique Carter, Wendy 
Wallace, and Lori McFarland all scored 
an average of eighteen points per game. The 
varsity record was seven wins and nine los- 
ses before the sectional. The J.V. team won 
ten of fourteen season games despite losing 
sixteen players to bad grades and varsity. 
Besides the three seniors Beth Lutocka, 
Lori McFarland, and Kathy Deer, Coach 
John Allen will plan to see all the other 
players next season. Although the girls didn't 
have a team captain, if someone had to 
take responsibility, it was usually Beth 
Lutocka. 

When Coach Allen was asked how he 
liked being coach, he replied he really en- 
joyed it. There were many rewards for him 
-mainly to see the team improve through 
hard work and teamwork. Mr. Allen feels 
the team should be complimented on work- 
ing to correct or compensate for weakness 
and using their strengths to the best of 
their ability. Coach Allen feels the 1980's 



will be rewarding for the girls if they con- 
tinue to work as a team. Allen feels they 
will have excellent teams for the next sev- 
eral seasons. 

Those among the top players were sen- 
iors Kristy Deer, Beth Lutocka, and Lori 
McFarland. Juniors Monique Carter and 
Wendy Wallace, sophomores Lori Rogers 
and Kenya Willis, freshmen Gina Bunch 
and Traci Whiles also played varsity. 

When Kenya Willis was asked how she 
feels being one of the top players, she 
stated she would do her best to do anything 
she could to continue the girls' outstanding 
record. All the girls feel that it's very re- 
warding and but they couldn't have made 
it without their outstanding coach, John 
Allen. 

They were the runner-up in the 1979- 
1980 sectional. They beat Arlington 53-51 
and Cathedral 56-49, but lost to Warren 
Centr;al 45-49 in the final game. 

by Belinda Dodd 





Marshall scored a lot of baskets with their excellent A slam dunk is not an exceedingly hard shot for 
jumpers. Wendy Wallace. 



30/Girls' Basketball 




Wendy Walace prepares to snatch the ball and pass Kristie Deer finds herself at an easy position for a John Allen Gives the team some sure words of advice 
it for more points. basket. as the team prepares to get back on the court. 



Girls' Basketball/31 



I 



Track Rates Banner Year 



It was a banner year for the boy's 
track team. The Patriots had an 8-4-1 
record and were briefly rated eigh- 
teenth in the state. The team placed 
second in the sectionals and fifth in the 
city, respectively. "The top four scorers 
in dual competition," stated coach 
Butch Mozingo, "were Robin Johnson, 
Rudy Williams, Tony Washington and 
Punchy Blackman." 

The second place finish in the section- 
als was a complete team effort as the 
team showed balance and determina- 
tion. First place finishers for Marshall 
were Johnson (220) and the 880 relay 
team (Chris Withers, Blackman, Kevin 
Vardiman, Johnson). Blackman (220) 
and Williams (high jump) both finished 
second in their events. Washington (low 
hurdles) and the mile relay team (Er- 
nest Muse, Blackman, Vardiman, John- 
son) finished third. Withers (100), Tom 
Murphy (low hurdles), Ricky Wilson 
(220), Ed Kett (pole vault) and Randy 



Burch (long jump) finished close behind 
to give the Patriots valuable points. 

Johnson set three school records, in- 
dividually, and was on both relay teams 
who also set school records. Johnson 
ran the 100 in 9.8 on three different 
occasions and was voted outstanding 
trackster in Marion County by The In- 
dianapolis News for the week of April 8. 
In the 220 (21.8) and 440 (49.5) John- 
son had the quickest time in the 
school's twelve-year history. The mile 
relay team (Blackman, Muse, Vardiman, 
Johnson) ran a 3:24.3 for school 
records and the 880 team had the fast- 
est time in the city. Williams captured 
the high hurdles record with a 14.9. 

In the Regionals at Kokomo, Marshall 
finished fourth with three runners and 
the 880-relay team qualifying for state 
competition. Johnson ran the 220 in 
21.8 to set a regional record. 

by Gary Fischer 







mm mam %^ : 




Front Row: E. Muse, D. Blackman, R Wilson, K. 
Vardiman, R. Hohason, E. Kelt, C. McDowell, D. 
Houston, S. Williams. Second Row: Coach Smith, 
A. Allen, D. Brooks, V. Hall, F. Davis, T. Washing- 



ton, R. Williams, N. Mulerhy, J. Fields. Back Row: 
T. Murphy, M. Williams, R. Burch, D. Inman, C. 
Stubbs, Coach Mozingo, Coach Brown. 



Shown here at the city meet, Rudy Williams was 
one of Marshall's top runners. He holds the 
school record in the high hurdles. 



32/Track 



Junior Randy Williams is shown here in the two Warming up properly is important to all athletes 

mile race at the city meet. Randy ran both the in track. Randy Burch, a graduate, is shown here 

mile and two mile. warming up in the broad jump. 




Front Row: M. Howard, Y. Cannon, E. Sanders, T. Matthews, D. Mogollon, C. Boyless, Coach Brown. 
Paicely, T. Bailey, T. Johnson. Second Row: Coach Back Row: J. Brown, K. Flemings, L. Power, M. 
Smith, C. Steele, M. McCoy, E. Cummings, M. Opel, Coach Mozingo. 



Graduate Chris Stubbs attempts his first try at 5' 
6" but is unsuccessful. Stubbs ran as a sprinter 
as well as being a jumper. 



Track/33 



M 



Pat Girls Win 
Chatard Relay 



onique Carter was the out- 
standing performer on the girls track 
team. She won the 220 yard dash in the 
state meet and placed third in the 100 
yard dash. 

Carter, along with Beverly Bryant, 
Varinia Nevilles and Brenda Cody placed 
third in the sectionals and also in the 
city for the 880 relay. 

For the third consecutive year the 
Patriot girl's track team won the Chat- 
ard Relays. 

By Julie Mittman 





State champion Monique Carter receives the ba- Start of the girls 100-yard dash at Tech is corn- 
ton from Varina Nevilles in the 880-relay. Carter plicated by lane rules and false starts, 
anchored the team. 



34/Track 




At sectionals Monique took third place at the city 
meet at Tech. Coach Les Bivens lead the team 
last year. Nearly 30 girls participated. 




Track/35 




#1 Junior, Joe Knudson, bench presses a hundred 
and thirty-five pounds for conditioning. Weight lifting 
prepares many athletes for many of Marshall's of- 
fered athletic activities. 



Bob Jennings demonstrates the overhead press which 
strengthens the back muscles among others. Steve 
Blanche just happened to pop in. 



36/Jocks 




William Yarbrough laughs at the ease with which he 
presses this set during a usual session of lifting. 



Shown here flexing their hard-worked-for muscles are 
Jeff Fisher, Mark Osborne, Steve Blanche, William 
Yarbrough, Wayne Bradford, Mike Harter, Joe Knod- 
son, Eli Garza and Bob Jennings. 



Another of the weight lifters, Randy Langford, gets 
ready to attack the camera man during wrestling 
practice. 



Jocks/37 



More Points 
Per Meet 



c 



1 



oach William "Bill" Rosenstihl 
thinks this year's swim team achieved 
more points per meet than last. 

Last year's swim team only had six 
swimmers; this year there are five addi- 
tional swimmers. The five additional 
swimmers helped the depth of the 
team. 

Lynne Riley and Shelly Rosenstihl 
represented Marshall in the sectionals. 
The girls found it a big challenge. 

This year's team consisted of juniors 
Cindy Diehl, Liane Holder, Debbie Lowe, 
Lynne Riley, Marty Stoe and Shelly Ro- 
senstihl; sophomores Laura Disser, Sheri 
Novotny; freshmen Lisa Burcham, Sheila 
Hill and Laura Prunty. 

Swimmers participated in 50-100 
yard 500 freestyle, 100 butterfly, 100 
backstroke, 100 breast stroke, diving 
and 200 individual medley. 

by Michelle Toole 



i* 






i 



ft 




* — 



#W% ?•■ 




~*^-^^F' k P""Mt 




dMP 1 



^ 




t 



Timers start their clocks as the swimmers take 
off. Marshall is off toward another hopeful win. 



Front Row: Shari Novotny, Laura Prunty, Cindy 
Diehl, Laura Disser, Lisa Burcham. Back Row: Mar- 
ty Stoe, Liane Holder, Shelley Rosenstihl, Lynne Ri- 
ley, Sheila Hill, Debbie Lowe. 



After a long hard swim, Cindy Diehl struggles for 
her breath. Endurance was a large part of the 
swimmers' skills. 



38/Swimming 



Teamwork is important in every team as is shown Laura Disser rests on the edge of the pool to take 

here while Shari Novotny urges on her teammate. a breather after a practice swim. 




Debbie Lowe stretches out to relax and dry out 
after a rigorous practice. 



Swimming/39 



M 



Runners' Lower Times 



any new faces decorated the 
scene as the Patriot's Cross Country 
closed the season with a 6-7 record. 
Coached by "Butch" Mozingo, the team 
had great success and lowered individ- 
ual and overall times considerably. 

Led by Randy Williams, the team's 
number one runner, the varsity ran to 
victory on many occasions. Randy was 
followed closely by Marty Mulcahy most 
of the season. Marty is a second-year 
varsity man and finished second man 
for the season. 

First year runners Kenny Wood and 
James Fields surprised much of the 
team as they ran third and fourth man 
most of the season. Many veteran run- 
ners from other schools were aston- 
ished at these runners performances. 

Seniors on the team consisted of 
Mike Mulcahy, Brian Glotfelty, Ernest 
Nichols, and Milo Twigg. Mulcahy was a 



fine leader for the team and added to 
the team spirit. Brian Glotfelty was 
team captain, however, injuries kept 
Brian from playing to his full potential. 
Ernest Nichols and Milo Twigg gave 
much needed support to the team. All 
these senior runners will be missed. 

Near the end of the season the fifth, 
sixth, and seventh runners became 
quite competitive. Battling for the posi- 
tions were juniors Mike Schilling and 
Kenny Conners, and sophomores Mark 
Opel, Dave Mogollon, Charles Bayless 
and Mark McCoy. This made up the re- 
serve team. The reserve had a success- 
ful finish in the city coming in second. 

Freshmen came in a strong second in 
the city led by Mike Martin and Joe Ja- 
cobs. Joe Jarosinski, Mike Nichols, 
Cameron Irwin and Ryan Wells all gave 
great support to the freshmen squad. 

by Dave Mogollon and Brian Glotfelty 




Cross Country Runners— Back Row: Mike Martin, 
Mike Schilling, Brian Glotfelty, Mark Opel, Joe 



Jacobs, Randy Williams. Front Row: Milo Twigg, 
Mark McCoy, Dave Mogollon. 

A look of relief can be seen on Joe Jarosinski's 
face as he sprints in for the final yard of the race. 




Preparing for a meet is very important for a run- 
ner. Here Kenny Wood is on a warm-up run. 



407 Golf 




Golfers Go 
Co-Ed 

1 he Golf team gave it a good try 
last year with a 2-13 record. 

The team competed in the In- 
dianapolis Invitational Golf Tournament 
with fourteen other schools and placed 
sixth. 

The team also competed in the Ar- 
lington Invitational and placed fourth 
with a score of 347 at which Jay Bur- 
leson scored a high 85 for our team. 

Marshall also hosted the Marshall In- 
vitational and placed ninth with a score 
of 394. 

The team included Kent Von Burg, 
Jay Burleson, Dennis Roberts, Mike 
Kidwell, Matt Schlimgen, Rick Fenter, 
Richard Marsh and Diane Fisher. 

Coach David Smartz had a young 
team who "worked hard to improve." 
Several of the matches were close. 

by Scott Cox 




GOLF TEAM-Back Row: Coach Smartz, Mike 
Kidwell, Matt Schlimgen, Jay Burleson. Front 
Row: Kent Vonburg, Dennis Roberts, Diane 
Fisher, Rick Fenter. 

Graduate Jay Burleson concentrates fully on his 
putt. Jay was a great asset to the team and his 
members. 

Graduate Kent VonBurg drives his tee to get 
ahead in the Arlington Invitationals at which 
Marshall placed ninth. 



Golf/41 



FRESHMAN VOLLEYBALL-Top Row: Nina Gen- 
try, Yuonne Moore, Joni Kinser, Rita Sansooning, 



Christina Leakus. Bottom Row: Angela Tucker, 
Jewel Lynch, Michelle Nichol, Paula Marsh. 




numfll 



With the waiting assistance of her teammates, 
Paula RumkhorfT returns a difficult shot. 

J.V. VOLLEYBALL-Bottom Row: Michelle Nick- 
ell, Yuonne Moore, Cindy Stucker, Anita Washing- 
ton, Lori Hughes. Top Row: Valerie Recker, Chris 
McFarland, Debbie Lutocka, Jenny Matthews, 
Penny Shelton. 




42/Volleyball 





The Varsity volleyball team prepares their strategy 
for the remaining half of the game. 



VARSITY VOLLEYBALL-Vottom VOLLEYBALL- 
Bottom Row: Jeani Kuhn, Sheila Rudicell, Linda 
Raymer. Top Row: Lori McFarland, Debbie 
McDonald, Wendy Wallace, Paula Ruhmkorff, 
Beth Lutocka. 



Girls Work 
to Improve 

I he girls varsity volleyball team had 
nine wins and seven losses. 

"We are a young and inexperienced 
team," stated Miss Barbara Guhl, the 
Patriots new volleyball coach. "But," 
she added, "We are working very hard 
to improve our skills." 

The girls volleyboll team came on 
strong and beat some tough teams to 
start off the season. During the tourna- 
ment, though, the girls had some emo- 
tional problems. The coach felt that had 
something to do with the losses. 

There are some very promising talents 
on the reserve team. That, combined 
with the varsity players left from this 
year, should provide a nucleus for a 
good team. 

by Julie Mittman 
Photos: Brenda Brim 



Volleyball/43 



Goffinet's Baugh Girls defeat the Beauties 



he annual Powder-Pull football 
game we played on a cold, damp Sulli- 
van Field as the Bonfils Beauties and 
the Goffinet-Baugh Girls battled for vic- 
tory. The Baugh-girls made it a last 
second defeat for the Beauties. The en- 
thusiastic crowd cheered on their 
teams. The battle of the two teams 
made the evening exciting as well as 
captivating. 

The game started with the coaches 
and their teams huddled to go over last 
minute plays and make the night a 
memorable one. The Goffinet-Baugh 
girls started the kick-off with a tremen- 
dous tackle by the Bonfils Beauties. 
Monique (knee-deep) Casky made the 



first touch down for the Bonfils Beau- 
ties which was later followed by Jill 
Novotony of the Goffinet-Baugh girls. 
The game may have had feminine 
points, but the game had a lot of rough 
play and hard defense against the other 
team. 

Even if the game seemed to be fun, 
the coaches felt that the name was 
"fun" but to play the game took hard 
work, skills, and talent from both 
teams. The game was to be played "fair 
but firm." Each team's objective was to 
win and to have fun while playing. The 
girls all felt the game was educational 
towards sports and encouraged next 
year's senior girls to give it a try. Coach 



Bonfils commented, "I was impressed 
with my team's results. I also felt that I 
would rather lose a game than have two 
teams ending in a tie." 

Let us not forget the highlights of the 
game— the cheerleaders. The she/he 
cheerleaders cheered their team to- 
wards victory with every breath of song. 
Wes Gainey, captain of the Bonfils 
Beauties, commented, "I love the expe- 
rience of being a cheerleader except the 
continuous drafts up my skirt when I 
made a broad jump." Tony (Brick- 
house) Black, captain of the Goffinett- 
Baugh girls, replied, V T enjoyed myself 
but I seemed to have suffered a couple 
of runs in my stockings along the way." 




Senior Dianne Swineford runs for a touchdown as 
the Bonfils Beauties go for a tackle; however the 
Baugh Girls defeated them in the last ten sec- 
onds. 



44/Powderpuff 



Goffinet's Baugh Girls-First Row: Cindy Martin, Kelley Beck, Robyn Duff, 
Melanie Coulter, Pam Aitken, Shelli Rogers, Jill Novotny, Nikki Gentry, Vicki 
Franklin, Jackie Hibbert, Terri Gold, Dawn Forbis, Kim Hall, Lisa Greenwald, 
Karen Ginger, Mary DeVore. Second Row: Julie Brown, Aretha Williams, 
Pam Pinner, Lynne Toney, Linda Guttierez, Michelle Walker, Debbie Arnold, 



Nan Majors, Pam Wildrick, Luanne McDonald, Angie Robertson, Cindy 
Miller. Third Row: Coach Bill Baugh, Leisha Cannon, Sandi Keith, Debbie 
Cline, Leanne Morris, Lori Waller, Judy Tilley, Judy Campbell, Vickie Rey- 
nolds, Diane Johnson, Benita Calhoun, Teresa Armor, Dorria Ball, Lenne 
McGill, Dianne Swineford, Sally Spires, Coach Brad Goffinet. 





Bonfils Beauties— Bottom Row: Nancy Williams, Julie Rudd, Wendy Warfield, 
Julie Lightle, Cindy Bright, Lynne Fisher, Janelle White, Belinda Lindauer, 
Doneva Wheeler, Cindy Drake, Jamie Simmons, Barbie Mobley, Latrice 
Plant. Second Row: Lajuana Welch, Amy Cunningham, Mary Britton, Amy 
Brown, Tracie Harris, Nikki Trabue, Joyce Moore, Kathy Turner. Third Row: 



Carolyn McCallister, Jayne Kerr, Kerry Hallam, Sherri Lee, Debbie Lindauer, 
Jennifer Chapman, Kristy Deer, Coach Bonfils, Geri Lepscum, Joan Smith, 
Brenda Bonebraker, Monique Casey, Beverly Brewster, Alice Allen, Tonya 
Marsden, Kim Shanklin, Janetta Brown, Lori Pitcher. 



Powderpuff/45 



Inexperience, Major Downfall 



he girls' tennis team finished sev- 
enth in the city under the coaching of 
Linda James. Their final record for the 
season was 5-8. Dawn Forbis, Lori Rog- 
ers, and Pam Pinner proved to be the 
three top players of the season, leading 
the team to their five wins. 

Other players included Renee Lacy, 
Michelle Price, Julie Murphy, Queena 
Howard, and Cassandra Shelton on the 
varsity team. The reserve players were 
Kathy Turner, Laura Jordan, and Diane 
Johnson. 

Inexperience of city playing was the 
major downfall of the team, but Coach 



James is optimistic about the upcoming 
season. All of the players but two are 
returning this year. Renee Lacy and 
Michelle Price were lost to graduation. 
Practice over the summer has improved 
the players, as have tennis lessons. 

Pam Pinner, senior, predicts the team 
will finish as third runner-up, while 
Coach James predicts city runner-up. "I 
think we'll do much better. Last year 
the players were scared and we really 
bombed out. This year they have more 
experience and they're ready." 

Meanwhile, their male counterparts 
finished out with a 10-3 season this 



year. They came out second in the city. 
Coach John Bason felt the reason that 
the team didn't achieve "Number One" 
was because they lacked depth. 

Despite losses to Cathedral, Mount 
Vernon, and Lawrence North, the re- 
turning lettermen Darryl Whitley, were 
seeded number one single, Todd Van- 
Dyn, number one single, Stacey Ander- 
son, number one doubles, and Mark 
and Ed Russell all will return. 

Jeff Opel and Brent Van Duyn will be 
greatly missed. 

Photos by Russell 




Girl's Tennis Team: Top Row: Lori Rogers, Casandra Shelton, Coach James, 
Dawn Forbis, Queen Anne Howard, Michele Price. Bottom Row: Laura Jor- 
dan, Diane Johnson, Julie Murphy, Renee Lacy, Pam Pinner, Kathy Turner. 



Boy's Tennis Team: Top Row: Franklin Ogelby, Darrel Whitney, Stacey An- 
derson, Mark Russell and Coach Eason. Bottom Row: Todd VanDuyn, Eddie 
Lessley, Russell, Jeff Opel. 



46/Tennis 




Personalities 
Promote Spirit 

A 

m % s Patriot Personalities, seniors 
Kim Hall and Chip Jacobs helped pro- 
mote school spirit throughout the year. 
At all home games, the two could be 
seen, dressed in their Patriot uniforms 
cheering on the basketball and football 
teams. They also attended PATS meet- 
ings, helped film the orientation film, 
spoke at the freshman mixer, and 
marched in the Veteran's Day Parade. 

Nominees for Patriot Personalities 
were turned into Roger Schroder by 
faculty members at the end of 1979. 
Each nominee was interviewed by se- 
lected faculty members, senior class of- 
ficers, and Dwayne Doles and Sharon 
Turner, the 1978-79 Patriot Person- 
alities. 

Chip and Kim enjoyed being Patriot 
Personalities this year. Kim Hall sum- 
med up both their feelings when she 
said, "It gave me the opportunity to ex- 
press my enthusiasm and support for 
Marshall." 

by Carole A. Terry 



Chip Jacobs, seems to be wondering about the 
"new" mascot for the Pats. 



Dressed warmly, senior Kim Hall, the female half 
of the Patriot Personalities claps for the band. 



Patriot Personalities/47 



MARSHALL 
LAW 

in Academics 



A 



dvancement has always been a 
big part of the American way of life. 
High Schools are also a part of this ad- 
vancement, especially in their academics 
curriculum. 

Since there has been a greater de- 
mand for a higher education, high 
schools have been expanding the fields 
of classes offered. John Marshall has 
taken a large step forward in this direc- 
tion. Marshall has its students inter- 
ested and involved in many aspects of 
science and mathematics, two fields 
usually dreaded by most students. 
"Marshall Law" takes pride in its aca- 
demic excellence. 

Eddie Lessley and Cheryl Morris collapse after an 
invigorating bicycle exercise. No, now seriously 
folks, it was play practice which looks exhausting. 

Relaxing a bit and grading papers, which isn't re- 
laxing at all, Mr. George sits casually at his desk. 

Taking notes, notes and more notes, Amy Cun- 
ningham keeps that pen moving and those fingers 
cracking to keep up her grades. 




I 



I 



48/Academics 



Summer School attracts 900 



Q 

^ 00 and more students reported to 
school every morning for summer 
classes. 

New classes offered this year were 
journalism and the senior class prepara- 
tion for the SAT test. 

The most popular class taken was 
Drivers Education. v Tt's a wonderful 
feeling knowing you will be getting your 
license with in the year," is a comment 
made by many students. 

Summer school is a useful tool but is 
recommended for the following pur- 
poses: familiarizing freshmen to the 
building, to repeat failed classes, to take 
electives that can't be scheduled, and to 
take the SAT class for college-bound 



students. 

College-bound students had an ad- 
vantage this summer by taking the SAT 
preparatory class. Marshall offered this 
class which was team taught. 

Techniques used in this class were 
practice exams, vocabulary building, and 
mini-math lessons. When asked if he 
would recommend this class to college 
bound students, Dave Roberts com- 
mented, "By all means! It's a good re- 
view before the SAT test which is re- 
quired by most colleges." 

by Michelle Toole 

Photos Perkins/Smith/ Powell 





Joe Jacobs takes time out from his summer 
school gym class to pose for a summer-time shot. 



Getting in extra practice during summer school 
was an asset for Marshall's musicians. This was 
Robert Meurer's first year with the Patriots. 



50/Summer School 




Night School 
Enrollment Up 

ohn Marshall's Adult Evening 
School is attracting more drop out stu- 
dents than ever. Students which once 
had quit are coming back for the wide 
variety of credit classes that are offered 
Monday through Thursday. All the 
classes can be accredited to high school 
completion, salable skills, or personal in- 
terest. 

Clifford Snyder reports that the driver 
education is drawing the biggest atten- 
dance and has a waiting list. The adult 
school is growing with real estate sale 
classes. 

Walking around the night school area, 
you may see just a little more than your 
normal student— housewives, blue collar 
workers and businessmen are all going 
back to school for one reason or an- 
other. Night school is a good place to be 
whether pursuing a diploma or hobby. 

by Sandi Hutchison 




Intensive study and ambition are qualities found Many students found night school was a great 

in the night school student. advantage for those with jobs and other daytime 

responsibilities. 



Night School/51 



Librarians 
'Super Staff 



F 



inding certain material in a library 
sometimes presents a problem. We Pat- 
riots though, are lucky to have two very 
capable librarians, Mrs. Virginia 
McDonald and Mrs. Rebecca Hertz. Both 
are always more than willing to assist 
any student. This fall 250 new books were 
purchased, along with 1600 new paper- 
backs. An order is in for additional 
paperbacks for the reading enjoyment of 
the students. 

On the library staff along with 
McDonald and Hertz are Paul Justice, 
Mrs. Judy Fee and Mrs. Fran Jacobs. 
They work together to try and round up 
approximately 2000 students so pictures 
could be taken of smiling faces for the 
I.D. cards. Mrs. Fee oversees the viewing 
room while Jacobs takes care of the 
charge desk. Justice is the AV man. 

"We think that our library compares 
favorably with other high school libra- 
ries as far as size and capabilities go," 
stated McDonald. She also added that 
she thought the library staff was "su- 
per." All work together very hard to 
make our own I.M.C. the success it is. 

by Julie Mittman and 
Theresa Hupp 

Algebra teacher Gary Wyne prepares the bad 
news for students as he grades the tests. 

Reclining during a free period, Mr. Clifford Snyder 
reads The Star. The IMC is always stocked with 
current newspapers. 



52/IMC 




The IMC staff poses for Marhiscan photographer 
during an almost-never-seen-moment. Mrs. 
Becky Hertz, Mrs. Judy Fee, Mr. Paul Justice, 
Mrs. Virginia McDonald, Mrs. Fran Jacobs. 




IMC/53 



Conversation 
Important 



M 



arshall's Foreign Language De- 
partment is one of the best in the city 
and is headed by Ruth Nelson. The de- 
partment claims Spanish is the class 
most people enrolled in. Communica- 
tion, speaking, reading and writing— all 
are stressed in each class whether it be 
French, Spanish, German or Latin. Nel- 
son also said culture and customs of the 
countries are also taught. 

Some classes have been known to 
study unusual things such as folk-danc- 
ing, poetry, cooking, and drama because 
these are things not required but thou- 
roughly enjoyed. The department also 
received a new teacher this year, Mrs. 
Jane Meranda, who is replacing Ms. 
Bailey in Latin. She is also at Howe 
High School part-time. A Russian 
course was to be offered but it was 
dropped when student enrollment and 
teacher time decreased this fall. Nelson 
also said all Foreign language teachers 
at school are willing to work with their 
students to help them update and to 
learn the expected skills. 




>4£ 




Senior David Clapp feels a large part of foreign 
language entails many quizzes. They are given al- 
most daily to each of his classes. 



German class study time is often a personal study 
time as some students demonstrate here as they 
take time out for other homework and gathering 
their thoughts. 



54/Foreign Language 



Kevin Fields listens intently to a class lecture and 
takes time to jot down a few important notes in 
his foreign language class. 

Terri Ramsey stares off into space during a lec- 
ture in her US History class. 




Foreign Language/55 



Basics Plus 
Many Electives 

ff T 

he English Department 
recognizes the need for a good basic 
background in English; therefore, it 
makes every effort to cover all of the 
so-called basics," explains Dr. James 
Gaither. With such classes as Mark 
Twain and Folklore that alternate 
Spring and Fall semesters, the student 
gets a wider variety of phase elective 
courses. The English Department plans 
to restructure some of its phase elec- 
tives, and add some that might be more 
meaningful. For example, Dr. Gaither 
would like to see Indiana Culture 
brought to the English Department in 
the future; but, phase electives are lim- 
ited due to the lack of rooms, teachers, 
and students. 

All freshmen and sophomores are re- 
quired to take basic English courses. 
The English department encourages all 
students to take as many English 
courses and "urges variety in courses." 

By Letitia Stuart 

Photos by Stewart, Perkins, Baker, 

Powell, Cox 





An English student decides to erase and start 
over on a new sentence in her elective English 
class Word Powers. 



Although Library Experience is not listed as an 
English elective nor is it considered basic English, 
one half credit can be earned. 



56/English 




Sophomore John Lacy quizzes Cindy Diehl for an 
English exam. All sophomores are required to 
take basic English. 

Mr. Greg Shelton shows that he's informal with 
his students as we caught him during one of his 
Short Story classes. 

arie McGillem looks on with a friend as she 
studies different forms of literature in her English 
class. 



English/57 



Computers Expand Classes Offered 



M 

III athematics is not just an aver- 
age required two credits. It has become 
one of the most interesting and reward- 
ing courses of study offered to students. 
Over the past few semesters the Math 
Department has had an increasing in- 
terest taken by students in the Com- 
puter Math classes. Among the chal- 
lenging concepts of mathematics taught 
in Computer Math, students wrote and 
"debugged" various programs which 
were sometimes used to tutor Basic and 
General Math students. These programs 
were often written by Advanced Com- 
puter Math students. Much enthusiasm 
was shown by Department Head Robert 
Carr, Computer Math teacher Dave 
Roberts, as well as the rest of the de- 
partment teachers, in prompting stu- 
dents' interest in this field of math- 



ematics. Their enthusiasm has been 
justified also because of the new locker- 
distribution system that was put into 
successful effect this year with the help 
of their computer equipment and stu- 
dents. 

Last spring's annual Marion County 
Math Day resulted with many of our 
students going home with awards as 
high as second place. Winners were as 
follows: beginning Algebra: Kristie Hut- 
zler, 8th place, Jane Riley, 19th place; 
Geometry: Judi Brezausek, 15th place; 
Comp. Math: Toni Petrucciani, 2nd 
place, James Coons, 4th place, and 
Brian Stewart, 6th place. 

The annual St. Mary-of-the-Woods/ 
Rose-Hulman Math Contest had repre- 
sentatives of John Marshall attending. 
These 1979 contestants included: 



Freshmen Angela Barnes, Steven Yates; 
Sophomores Wanda Chenault, Tim 
Lonis, Alonzo Walker; Juniors James 
Coons, Brian Stewart, and Seniors Ve- 
nessa Lake and Pete Riley. 

Besides getting students involved with 
mathematics by offering interesting 
classes and contests, the Math Depart- 
ment also had as many as three or four 
booths entered in Marshall's Family 
Fun Night festivities. 

Our high school has had many aca- 
demic and activity achievements accred- 
ited to it, it's Math Department has 
proved to be one of them. 

by Jill Wetzel 

Photos by Perkins/Stewart/ Powell 







58/ Math 




Dave Roberts clears up his Intro Computer Math students' dif- 
ficulties with organized explanations. 



Advanced Algebra, one of the most challenging classes offered, takes time and patience. 
Gary Wyne explains aspects of mathematics involving conic sections. 



Math/59 



Pats Discover 
New Respect 



T 



he Social Studies Department is 
headed by Dwight Shaw. 

Mr. Shaw explained that the main pur- 
pose for social studies is to develop good 
citizenship and respect for one's country. 
Mr. Shaw believes that government and 
economic classes increase student's polit- 
ical awareness and help them to under- 
stand problems. 

U.S. History is the most popular with 
students, Mr. Shaw related. It is a 
problem, however, to find material that 
is interesting to both the student and 
teacher. 

History is a class that can benefit all 
students if they will take an interest. 

Economics students study the stock 
market and learn the hard truths about 
inflation. World History students exam- 
ine such problems as Iran and the Rus- 
sian invasion of Afghanistan. 

Mrs. Joyce Sausser had her students 
participate in a mock election to dis- 
cover "real politics." 

Ronnie Hanson 

A few U.S. History students discuss the day's 
work before class. 

Social Studies teacher John Deal looks for a film 
strip to illustrate a lesson to his history class. 




60/Social Studies 



Substitute teacher Lenny Brickens forlornly 
looks at his students. 




Students diligently work on a test in their history 
class. U.S. History is a mandatory class for grad- 
uation. 



Social Studies/61 



I 



Biology 
Popular? 



his year's Science Department 
kept biology students busy by having 
them collect leaves the first semester. 
Bird watching and dissecting kept the 
students occupied the second semes- 
ter. Biology is required for all soph- 
omores so it was one of the most "pop- 
ular" classes. 

The Zoology students took many 
trips. The big trip they take every year 
is over spring break to Okefenokee. 
Some of the other trips are to the 
Smokey Mountains and Fall Creek. 

Norma Dillion is head of the ten- 
teacher department which offered many 
exciting classes this year. Added to the 
list of classes for the first time was As- 
tronomy. Some of the regular classes 
were Chemistry, Earth Science and 
Zoology, plus many more. If you like 
science and taking trips, you would en- 
joy a Science class. 

by Kim Wilson 




Senior Brent VanDuyn is all wrapped up in his 
zoology class. Zoology students study and dissect 
various animal species. 



62/Science 



If you plan on taking Zoology, you have to 
overcome a fear of animals for handling and 
identifying is a big part of this class. 

Senior Barbie Mobley along with her lab assis- 
tant finds labwork very much a part of Chem- 
istry. 




Science/63 



ROTC 

Promotes 
Leadership 

§^J id war break out at John Mar- 
shall? This thought may have run 
through some peoples' minds every 
Thursday as they saw many students 
walking in the hall in military uniforms. 
But there was no cause for alarm be- 
cause these students were simply mem- 
bers of ROTC. 

The uniforms were worn for neatness, 
according to Sergeant William Penning- 
ton. ROTC is a course which promotes 
leadership and neatness. The main ob- 
jective of ROTC is to give leadership, not 
the Army. "I'd rather see them go to 
college than to the Army." 

Participating in several contests, 
many students involved in ROTC re- 
ceived awards for inspection, athletics, 
Colorguard, Civic activities and student 
council. 

The ROTC students participated in a 
national physical fitness program earlier 
in the year. The rifle and drill team also 
entered competition and mailed their 
team and individual scores in for eval- 
uation. 

by Greg Kramer 
Photos by Simmons 

Sophomore Bernice Schrock shows Sgt. Penning- 
ton how much she enjoys his class with a forceful 
blow in the stomach. 

Part of ROTC training is leadership. Senior Don 
Smith teaches markmanship to one of the ROTC 
squads. 



64/ROTC 




Richard Sharp, Anita Smith, and Tim Nugent are 

in Marksmanship training. This takes a steady Rifle Team Member Frank Flesser prepares to 

hand and sharp sight. fire. 





Bottom Row: Lisa Baker, Anita Smith, Pat Collins, Sheila Smith, Dana Lewis, Cynthia Robinson. Sec- 
ond Row: Tim Jones, David Livingston, Kevin Hudson, Davey Anderson, Bruce Davis, Commander Quen- 
tin Simmons. Top Row: Milton Dungey, Paul Rifner, Chico Schaffer, Evan Kirk, Peter Rifner. 



ROTC/65 



One More Time Around the 

Gym! 



|^ veryone takes part in Marshall's 
well rounded P.E. program. With 
enough variety such as the track and 
fielding events, every athletic ability is 
covered. 

"Even if they don't work, they're en- 
couraged to dress for points," states 
Martha Griffin, girls P.E. teacher and 
cheerleading coach. 

Gym is made to be fun, though some 
students often hate gym class because 
their stronger peers put the weaker 
ones down. For the most part students 
enjoyed gym and even look forward to 
the period they had it. 

To give the students the basics of 
mental illness, alcohol, emotions, body 
parts, and drugs were the main objec- 



tives in the one-semester required 
course of health. 

Brad Goffinet who has been teaching 
for five years says there were about 170 
students enrolled inHealth. He also said 
that his goals for the students were to 
try to teach them to learn as much as 
possible about themselves and the envi- 
ronment around them. 

In health the assignments were 
mainly on health articles from newspa- 
pers due every week and a four page 
essay was required at the end of the 
second six-week period. 

Sandy Hutchison 
and Scott Cox— 





I 

■4 

\ 



\ 



Mr. Bash, student teacher for Mr. Goffinet's 
health class, explains in full detail the hazards of 
drugs. 



66/ Health 




Volleyball is always active in girls' P.E. The fresh- 
man program is a good start for students starting 
in high school. 



Phys. Ed./67 



35 Youngmen become 

homemakers 



u 

! !| ome Economics which consists of 
foods and clothing classes has improved 
over the last two semesters. Apparently 
more and more young men are involved 
in the foods classes. Last year there 
were 1007 female students in school 
and 35% of those were enrolled in one 
of the classes. There were 1005 males 
but there were only 35 enrolled in the 
classes. The department is encouraging 
more young men to take up the class. 
The foods program has been offered for 
six years. The main purpose of the 
classes is to get students to major in 
certain fields. Skills as well as talents 

With a look of determination, Anita Brewer works 
hard in one of the ever-popular clothing classes. 

Cassandra Jones and Trenda Means learn the 
techniques of using a sewing machine. 



are developed. Clothing students used 
their skills to do many service projects 
for school activities and for staff mem- 
bers— atheletic department, school mu- 
sicals and projects for individual staff 
members. Also, clothing and textiles 
students received awards for their 
achievements at the County-wide Fash- 
ion Show. Mrs. Marilyn Johannessen 
comments that it's a recent devel- 
opment that young persons want to 
learn sewing and cooking crafts again. 

By Belinda Dodd/Photos by Baker 




68/ Home Ec. 





Mary Breyer and Dawn Best works on their Mrs. Simon demonstrates one of the tedious skills 
projects during clothing class. of clothing. 



Home Ec/69 



..(■E 




Norma Navarro took this appealing shot of a fu- To fulfill the special effects assignment, Tammy 
ture model for her photography class. Poore created this dream effect. 



70/Art 





Becky Baker was able to get this reversal by 
shooting her original picture with special film. 

In art and photography, composition is important. 
Loren Volz uses the "rule of thirds" in her still 
life. 

Portraits are also part of Ed Ring's photography 
course. This is Norma Navarro's. 



Art/71 



A 



Meet the Fourth Estate 



s students and faculty passed 
by room 236 and saw a mass of stu- 
dents making a path in and out of the 
door, they probably thought that they 
were studying "advanced restroom". 
Just to clear all thoughts of that na- 
ture, they were actually doing their as- 
signments. 

In order to put out a well-done publi- 
cation, staff members of the newspaper, 
The Liberator and the school's year- 
book, the Marhiscan, must go behind 
the scenes to get the information 
needed. 

The Marhiscan staff, headed by co- 
editors Pam Lloyd and Kathy Weir, con- 
sisted of able-bodied writers, typists, 
artists and photographers. 

From the end of last year all the way 
through February, these staffers 



worked long, hard hours to publish the 
yearbook. 

Jeff Opel and Dorria Ball acted as a 
great team leading the Liberator staff 
in writing excellent news, features, edi- 
torials, and sports stories. They also 
found out what hard work it was to 
meet deadlines on a bi-monthly publica- 
tion. 

Heading up this class of mass con- 
fusion was Janet Eberle. She played 
back-up to both of the publications to 
insure smoothness of stories and lay- 
outs. She also kept the second period 
"animals" in line. "We couldn't have 
done it without her," stated editor 
Kathy Weir. 

— Pam Lloyd/Photos by Perkins, Eberle 





Stephanie Jones, New Bureau Editor, makes sure 
Pats are known city-wide. It's not an easy job. 

Sometimes publications periods are not with the 
main staff time. Mark Goff, Linda Moore, Gary 
Fischer, Chris Kane, Curt Lake and Todd Van 
Duyn work on own time for the staffs. Gary and 
Todd are the sports editors and Curt is feature 
editor for the newspaper. 

Becky Baker, photographer, does survive Co-Edi- 
tor Pam Lloyd's attack. When putting "drama" in 
pictures, anything goes. 




72/ Publications 



The Liberator Staff: Clockwise: Bob Foster, Wanda Chenault, Tina Fair, 
Chuck Lacy, Rhonda Ball, Angie Chapman, Sheila Hill, Sabrina Mays, Jeff 
Spradlin, Lori Rogers, Cindi Stucker, Patrice Sanders, Tony Black, Viva Lee, 
Becky Boyd. 




The Marhiscan Staff: Standing: Sharon Tilley, Chuck Lacy, Gerald Wade, Be- 
linda Dodd, Amy Brangan, Brenda Brim, Mike Martin, Barbi Tremain, Greg 
Kramer, Jeanie Cutshaw, Scott Cox, Cindy Waller, Julie Mittman, Julie Loy, 



Theresa Hupp, Letitia Stuart, Linda Brooks. Sitting: Jill Wetzel, Carole Terry, 
Becky Baker, Quintin Simmons, Keith Powell, Jerry Goldman, Sandra Keith, 
Kris Kesic, Michelle Toole, Dave Mogollon. 



Publications/73 




Every artist must possess the skill used in portrait 
drawing. In Mr. Utley's Commercial Art class, 
Curtis Piatt proves his skills are outstanding. 

Advanced art students prepare artwork for the 
National Scholastics Competition. This prepara- 
tion takes much patience and hard work. 

Senior Tony Anderson works diligently on a piece 
for his Advanced Art class. Tony has had many 
award-winning pieces over the years. 



Senior Rose Scheibulhut, second year Commercial 
Art student, finds it's a lot harder than it looks to 
use an airbrush. 



74/Art 




Creativity is 

the Key 
A 

w m Ithough a steady hand and good 
technical quality are important factors 
in art, they are not the most important. 
The main quality expected of a success- 
ful artist is creativity. 

Students who enrolled in art classes 
for an "easy credit" were probably 
somewhat surprised. Diligence, imagina- 
tion, and outstanding artwork were 
among the standards set by the art de- 
partment. 

Some of the classes offered in the art 
department were Craft Design and Ba- 
sic Art for freshmen; Photography, Ce- 
ramics, Textiles and Advanced Art for 
upperclassmen. For those students 
maintaining a "B" average in art, Com- 
mercial Art classes were available. 

The "500 Festival" and "The National 
Scholastics Art Competition" along with 
Marshall's own "Festival of the Arts" 
were just some of the contests art stu- 
dents entered throughout the year. 

Many students who participated in 
these art contests received awards for 
their creative efforts. And many were 
rewarded by the mere fact that they 
were able to express themselves 
through their artwork, thus proving that 
to become successful in art, creativity is 
the key. 

by Kathy Weir 

Senior Curtis Piatt laughs at the instructor's joke 
in his portrait drawing in Commercial Art class. 
Curt transferred here from San Diego 

Airbrush is paint pushed through a gun by an air 
compressor. Senior Kathy Weir, a third year Com- 
mercial Art student, demonstrates her airbrush 
abilities. 



Art/75 



Students Take 
Pride In Work 

|| industrial Arts has always been a pop- 
ular course in the curriculum at John 
Marshall High Schoo 

Department Head Robert Chisley 
stated, "Marshall gives the basics, pre- 
paring the students for the Career Cen- 
ter at Tech." 

The curriculum this year includes 
printing, power mechanics, woodshop, 
metal shop, drafting, auto body, weld- 
ing, and electronics. 

Like last year the classes are about 
evenly distributed. Most of the students 
involved in Industrial Arts are there ei- 
ther to learn a trade or just to have fun 
and take pride in their work 

by Chuck Lacy/Photos by Perkins 




76/Industrial Arts 



Many students interested in keeping their cars in 
good repair are attracted to auto body classes. 




Industrial Arts/77 



Mystery Comes to Marshall 



| he spiral staircase" offered an ex- 
cellent opportunity for amateur sleuths to 
try their hand at figuring out the mys- 
tery. In October, Director Jerry Hurst 
was beginning to look forward to an 
exciting performance. He was excited 
about his cast, and the material he was 
working with. 

Mr. Hurst summed up the effec- 
tiveness of the play, "It's a good mys- 
tery." Nothing is revealed or solved until 
the last minutes of the play. The play 
holds a number of shocking moments 
for the audience along with several sur- 
prises. "I think the audience will re- 
spond very well." 

Mr. Hurst was also pleased with his 
cast. Priscilla Erickson, Brian Martin, 
Chip Jacobs, Jennifer Chapman, Mike 
Mulcahy, Donna Chalupa, Julie Murphy, 
and Bill Stineman made up the small 
cast. Acting as assistant director, "Go- 
fer", and the operator's voice was Me- 
lissa McGillum. The cast was experi- 
enced and enthusiastic. They were 
convinced even before the show that 
the play would be a success. 



"The Spiral Staircase" was based on 
murders which took place in a small 
New England town. Young women with 
physical defects fell victim to the mur- 
derer's plot. 

Only the last few scenes in the play 
allow the audience to discover the mur- 
derer is Professor Warren, played by 
Chip Jacobs. Warren discovers he is 
alone with Helen, a mute girl played by 
Jennifer Chapman. He quickly plots a 
murder. As Warren chases down Helen, 
his stepmother, Julie Murphy, sneaks in 
and shoots Warren. Mrs. Warren has 
feigned paralysis throughout the play 
and explains to Helen that it was to 
keep her eye on her stepson to obtain 
proof. 

After explaining her motives for mur- 
dering Warren, Mrs. Warren dies of a 
heart attack. Helen discovers she can 
speak. "The Spiral Staircase" ended in 
shock and surprise as Mr. Hurst had 
promised. 

by Carole Terry/photos by Smith 




As Nurse Barker, Donna Chalupa was constantly Senior Bill Stineman along with Chip Jacobs and 
on the go as shown here. Donna Chalupa prepare for opening night. 



78/Spiral Staircase 




Priscilla Erickson, as Mrs. Oates the alcoholic As the Constable, Brian Martin listens intently to Jennifer Chapman, Donna Chalupa, and Bill Stin- 
maid, relaxes after a bit too much to drink. instructions from offstage. man spend a leisure moment sharing a favorite 

book. 



Spiral Staircase/79 




Micro-computer 
To be Added 

| he Business Department at Mar- 
shall offers a variety of clerical, and 
merchandising training programs. COE 
is a clerical training program, which is 
only offered to seniors. The COE pro- 
gram will place a student in a part-time 
job for which they will get credits and a 
salary. DE is another program similar to 
COE, except that it deals with merchan- 
dising. 

Typing is still the most pupular busi- 
ness course offered. Many students 
found it very beneficial to take this 
class. 

This spring the new micro-computer 
was put to use. The computer will not 
only be used for business classes, but 
also for the other departments. Stu- 
dents will be trained to operate the new 
computer which will be a great asset to 
their education. 



Students in Accounting work very hard for better Mike Hutzler studies this problem very thor- 
understanding of bookkeeping. oughly, so he will get a good grade in accounting. 



80/Business 





Adding machines help students during accounting 
and bookkeeping class. 

Practice makes perfect, especially in typing. The 
business department allows students to practice 
after school. 

Debbie Plummer works this problem out using her 
new skills. 



Business/81 



Marshall Law 
in Activities 
T 

| ; he activities at Marshall are really 
something that the Patriots can be 
proud of. Anything from music to 
cheerleading gives the students some- 
thing else to do. Something different 
from hum-drum of everyday school life 
is there for everyone here at Marshall. 
Every activity that goes on here can be 
fun, worthwhile, and a benefit to all. 





Patriot Baton Twirler Mary Miller performed well 
at M.S. A. during half time action against Franklin 
Central in the Sectionals. 



Sponsoring the Key Club, David Otto displays the 
banner of the club. 

Ron King and Randy Smith seem to be holding 
matmaid Celest Moore in a cheerleader pose mat 
butlers. The butlers were a Marshall first. 

Fully expressing their spirit in the school, the 
band blows another emotion tune. 



82/Activities 



R 



Patriots On Parade was the 'Main Event' 



atriots on Parade, the all school 
talent show, was a huge success despite 
fears of having to cancel the show, 
which was the 13th annual, because of 
setting the show back one month. 

The show featured performances by 
Marshall's top vocal ensembles. The 
Liberty Bells, Marshall's all-female en- 
semble, performed a song "Celebrate" 
by the Three Dog Nite, the Sons of Lib- 
erty, the all-male ensemble, performed 
a musical comedy skit as they sang "Of- 
ficer Krumpke" a song from the award- 
winning Broadway musical "West Side 
Story". Tbe Marshallaires, Marshall's 
mixed ensemble, performed a song 
from the movie "The Wiz". 

Jennifer Chapman and Chip Jacobs 
both sang contemporary songs which 



received great applause. The program 
also was laced together by well done 
comedy skits, the most memorable of 
which was about Noah and the Lord 
and their fight to build an arc. 

Two dance numbers, were in the 
show. One was performed by Paula 
Burleson and Cindy Cotrell, who danced 
with a jazzy disco style to Bob Seger's 
hit song "Old Time Rock-n-Roll", and 
another number which had sophomore 
Charles Montgomery dancing to "Don't 
Stop Til You Get Enough" by Michael 
Jackson. 

Jennifer Chapman, who opened the 
show with her rendition of the "Theme 
from the Main Event", a performance 
that may well have put Barbara to 
shame, will be missed by producers Jan 



Eberle and Cynthia Featheringill since 
she performed in, or was part of four 
acts. The show also featured two 
firsts— a flute performance and a foot- 
stomping harmonica player. In all the 
show was enjoyed by all who paid the 
mere $1.50 to witness these young but 
talented performers. 

Paul Justice and his stage crew 
headed by student manager Randy 
Smith built colorful blocks for the set. 
Lighting the sign and re-building the 
runway test the crew's electronic tal- 
ents. Nearly 30 students were involved in 
the back stage effort to produce the 
show. 

by Mark Goff 




"How long can you tread water?" The Noah skit 
that had the audience in hysteria would have won 
the comedy award during Patriots on Parade. 

One of the more touching moments during Patri- 
ots on Parade was the duet by Seniors, Jennifer 
Chapman and Chip Jacobs singing "Hear The 
Band". 




84/P.O.P. 



Senior Jane Kerr's first appearance on Patriots 
on Parade had her playing and singing "Time". 
This song was written for her by her sister 

One of the more unusual talents proved to be the 
ability to play the harmonica. Freshman Kevin 
Hudson had the audience clapping along. 




P.0.P./85 



o 



Band Had to Catch Up 



rchestra director Raymond 
Brandes felt that the main concern this 
year was to catch up on the work that 
was missed by the band and the orches- 
tra because of the strike. 

The Orchestra was busy with special 
productions as well as Christmas pro- 
grams as in the past years. Also among 
new programs was the electronic piano 
laboratory introduced this year. The pi- 
ano laboratory is influential in teaching. 

When asked about outstanding stu- 
dents, Brandes stated, "We have many 
strong freshmen this year who look like 
they will go far." 

Robert Meurer, this year's band di- 
rector, led the marching band to win a 
second division rating while competing 



in the district marching band contest. 
In this contest the marching band com- 
peted against about 38 bands from all 
over the state. 

The band played and marched to 
three selections, "Espana", "Send In 
the clowns", and "Beethoven's Ninth 
Symphony" under the direction of Rob- 
ert Meurer and drum majors Robert 
Hoffman and Tim McMillan. 

This year's orchestra consisted of 
about 45 students. Students in band or 
orchestra earn one-half credit per se- 
mester while learning and enjoying. 
They also form the pep band and musi- 
cal orchestra. 

by Amy Brangan 





Senior Rick Fenter carries the insignia of the 
band on his drum as he beats to the music. 



Mary Miller really struts her stuff as she twirls 
herself in front of the band. 



Senior Drum Major Bob Hoffman leads the band 
and shouts off the count to keep up the beat. 



86/ Band 




Freshman Pat Donahue really belts out the sound 
with the sure tone of the brass behind him. 



Tim McMillian finds being Junior Drum Major a 
never ending task. 



The Patriot Marching Band stands at attention 
and salutes the crowd with their music. 



Band/87 



Enthusiasm the Secret 



?i 



E 



nthusiasm is the secret to being 
a good cheerleader." 

That's the feeling of Mrs. Martha Grif- 
fin, who has been the sponsor of the 
Patriot cheerleaders for 13 years. She 
believes the cheerleaders must display 
this spirit whether the Patriots are win- 
ning or losing. 

"I tell the girls 'where on the cheer- 
leading application did it say they would 
be cheering only for a winning team'," 
said Griffin. "They act enthusiastic and 
keep the crowd the same way." 

"Mrs. Griffin firsts enthusiasm as one 
of the four requirements for a cheer- 
leader. The other requirements are 



movement, gymnastics, and appearance. 

Prettiness is not a necessary factor 
for being a cheerleader. An outgoing 
personality is more important for a 
cheerleader Griffin explained. 

The girls practice every day during 
ninth hour, and during basketball sea- 
son the boy counterparts practice with 
them. 

Mrs. Griffin summarized, "I enjoy 
very much working with the cheer- 
leaders, and I feel they are a very im- 
portant part of our athletic program." 

by Julie Mittman 




The entire cheerleading squad stands at attention 
at the beginning of the game. 



Never stopping to rest, freshmen cheerleaders 
Shana Langford (profile) and Cindy Cain cheer 
from the sidelines. 



88/Cheerleaders 




The varsity cheerleading squad helps keep the 
crowd alive. From right to left are Verina Nevilles, 
Julie Von Burg, Dee Dee Johnson, Lisa Green- 
wald, Karen Ginger and Monique Hunt are in the 
second row. 

During the basketball season male cheerleaders 
were added to the squad. Pyramid building be- 
came their specialty. 

Freshmen cheerleaders raise spirits in the Patriot 
men on the field. From front to back are Shana 
Langford, Jackie Allen, Regine Young. 




Cheerleaders/89 



Choral Groups Award 

Winning 



M 

If I arshall has always been out- 
standing in its choral groups. The music 
department offered freshman choir to 
interested students. Students that de- 
cide to continue their singing can try- 
out for the successful performing en- 
sembles the Sons of Liberty, Liberty 
Belles, Marshallaires and/or the Con- 
cert Choir. 

Under the direction of Cynthia Feath- 
eringill, the Marshall choral groups have 
worked hard all year in order to prepare 
for their performances. The groups per- 
formed at various places such as shop- 
ping centers, nursing homes and the 
children's guardian home. The groups 
also performed in the school's audito- 



rium. They performed for shows such as 
Pats on Parade, Cavalcade of Music, 
Swing Choir Festival, Festival of the 
Arts and The Yuletide Concert. 

Each year the groups take a song to 
district contests. If a group gets a first 
place in district they go to state contest. 
This year, all three groups won firsts in 
district. In the state, the Marshallaires 
and the Liberty Belles got a first and 
the Sons of Liberty placed second. 

For the first time, the Concert had 
planned a trip to Philadelphia in April. 
The choir planned to perform in con- 
tests there. 

Randy Smith/photos/Smith/Stewart 





Under the direction of Cindy Featheringill, The 
Concert Choir enjoyed performing all year. 



The Sons of Liberty, an all-male ensemble, take 
pride in performing their version of Rudolph the 
Red-Nosed Reindeer. 



90/Choral Groups 





The Marshallaires, a mixed ensemble, sing Jingle 
Bells during the Yuletide Concert at Christmas. 

Girls Freshman Chorus is one of the beginning 
choral groups at Marshall. 

Cindy Featheringill and Kenya Brooks look intense 
while trying to prepare for the Yuletide Concert. 



Choral Groups/91 



o 



Clubs Busy With Trips 



ne of the more interesting, yet 
rewarding school activities this year was 
membership in a foreign language club. 

The foreign language clubs were very 
busy as usual with the many in-and 
out-of-school activities. The German 
Club had the largest membership this 
year, 102. In November, the club took 
their annual out-of-state trip with the 
funds raised by candy sales. The club 
travelled to Lancaster, Pennsylvania, on 
a three-day trip. Other activities en- 
tailed a picnic, a pizza party, and a visit 
to Kings Island. 

The French Club, sponsored by Jan 
Hofts, started out the new school year 
by going to La Tours. The club had 



other activities during the year such as 
a Mardi Gras, a Halloween party, a pizza 
party, and a picnic. The club planned to 
wind up the year with a trip to Kings Is- 
land. 

The Spanish Club was very active with 
its candy sales. The funds were used to 
obtain club jerseys and various trips. 

The Latin Club, which is the smallest 
of the four clubs is sponsored by Helen 
Meranda. The club also sold candy for 
the profits going to various trips and 
club jerseys. 

by Sharon Tilley/photos/by Stewart/ 
Powell 





Spanish Club-First Row: Barbara Johnson, Marvolene Nicholson. Second Row: 
Dolores Seaton, Sabrina Mays, Andy Quintero, Priscilla Perkins, Tom Jones. 
Back Row: Stacey Cosby, Wanda Chenault, Rhonda Ball. 



92/Foreign Language Clubs 




French Club — Front Row: Leangela Falconer. Sec- 
ond Row: Peggy Cronin, Cathy Cronin, Sheila 
Moore, Tonia Johnson, Suzy Crabtree, Kari Ezell. 
Back Row: Rose Schiebelhut, Butch Ramsey, Ken 
Elliot, Peter Riley, Greg Fillenwarth, Rusty Da- 
vison, Jan Hofts. 




German Exec. Board- Front Row: Cindy Diehl, Lawana Welch, Felita White, 
Laura Disser. Back Row: Norman Gwaltney, Rebecca Bibbs, Lora Zandy, Brian 
Stewart, David Hudson, Jackie Pease, Frank Frost. 



Foreign Language Clubs/93 



PATRIOTS Face Poor 

Facilities 



he John Marshall boy's swim team 
ended their season with a 2 and 8 
record. Their coach, John Deal, says 
this was due mainly to poor facilities 
and a lack of program. The team has 
some swimmers that it was proud of. 

Three of the boys went on to the sec- 
tionals. They were Billy Rosenstihl, Gary 
Hallam and Allen Griffin. Rosenstihl 
swam the 100-yard butterfly and 100- 
yard backstroke. Hallam's events were 
the 200-yard IM and the 500-yard 
freestyle. Griffin swam both the 50 and 
100-yard freestyle. 



The freshrrten on the team are Allen 
Griffin whose event is freestyle, Bill 
Rosenstihl who swims both butterfly 
and backstroke, and Robert Ullenhank 
who swims the backstroke. The soph- 
omores are Gary Hallam who swims the 
IM and freestyle. John Lacy is the diver 
for the team. Sean Royce swims frees- 
tyle and Keith Williams swimming frees- 
tyle, also. The juniors consisted of Den- 
nis Browning and Dan Milligan. Senior 
John Gerber swam the backstroke. 

by Debbie Schwall 




Bottom— Coach John Deal, Gary Hallam, John 
Lacy, Allen Griffin, Bill Rosenstihl. Top— Dennis 
Browning, Keith Williams, Sean Royce, Rob Uh- 
lenhake, Sebastian Wohldorf. 



94 /Swim Team 




Team Does Well 
In Brain Game 



L 



fl 



ong hard practice was the key to 
winning for this year's quiz team. All of 
the teachers at Marshall submitted 
cards with questions on different sub- 
jects. The team members quizzed each 
other with these cards and practiced 
different strategies many days after 
school. 

Their practice was evident in the 
matches against Brebuef and North- 
west, whom they both beat with large 
margins in the score. 

The team members this year were 
Pete Riley, John Cutshaw, John Purcell, 
and Kenny Elliot. Alternates for the 
team were Brian Stewart, Joe Cutshaw, 
Lionel Butler. Lionel also served as 
team captain. 




Kenny Elliot, Pete Riley, John Cutshaw, John 
Purcell. Seen here they work on the electronics 
stage. 

photos/Stewart 



Mr. Craig drills the Quiz Team in preparation for 
a meet. Intense studying got them much recogni- 
tion. 



Quiz Team/95 



T 



Honor Societies Special 



hree honorary organizations at 
Marshall students vie for are Quill and 
Scroll, the publications honorary; Na- 
tional Honor Society, academic honor- 
ary, and Z Club, girls' service organiza- 
tion. 

Students at John Marshall were se- 
lected by faculty members on the basis 
of their grade point average for the Na- 
tional Honor Society. 

National Honor Society was founded 
in 1901. The reason for the National 
Honor Society was to give students an 
organization of a common symbol. The 
principle of the Society is to give stu- 
dents more prestige and strong empha- 
sis. 



At Marshall the chapter sells Valen- 
tine flowers for their only project of the 
year. The constitution states that stu- 
dents must be enrolled at least one se- 
mester here. 

Z Club is an extension of Zonta, a 
service organization. The girls in Z Club 
help usher at school functions, act as 
leaders during Family Festival, and help 
children who are underprivileged. Jenni- 
fer Chapman is president. 

Quill and Scroll is an honorary for ju- 
niors and seniors in publications who 
have been outstanding. They are the 
leaders of the yearbook and newspaper. 
Elected once a year, Pam Lloyd was this 
year's president. 





Pictured above is Z Club president Jennifer Chapman in one of her dramatic 
roles. Jennifer played Eliza in the spring musical. In the group picture are 
Quill and Scroll members Stephanie Jones, Jeff Opel, Letitia Stuart, Jill Wet- 
zell, Carole Terry, Sandra Keith, Preston Cosby, Julie Mittman, Brian Gough 



96/Honoraries 



and Dorria Ball. Not pictured are Pam Lloyd, Kathy Weir, Brian Stewart, 
Gary Fischer, Todd Van Duyn, Curt Lake, Tony Black, Richard VanAtta, Kim 
Wilson, Veronica Hanson and Suzanne Spradlin. 






% 


9 ^m 


w* 







Pam Weir uses her art ability in many areas. One 
is the yearbook. Above, from a Patriot on Parade 
skit is Bob Gray and Pete Riley. Riley was a Na- 
tional Merit Finalist. 




LIBERATOR EDITORS: Front Row: Jackie Pease, Dorria Ball, Rick VanAtta, Sluss, Rick Wood, Todd Van Duyn, Curt Lake. 
Brian Gough. Back Row: Debbie Lutocka, Preston Cosby, Jeff Opel, David 



Honoraries/97 



I I he 1979-1980 Student Council of- 
ficers found several ways to keep them- 
selves busy this year. Their busiest 
times seemed to be at Homecoming and 
at Christmas. This year the Student 
Council co-sponsored the Homecoming 
dance, collected money for Home- 
coming fireworks, purchased the "Pa- 
triot" hats for the first Marshall cheer- 
block and sponsored a spirit week. 
During Christmas, the Student Council 
sponsored a second spirit week, sold 
Christmas messages, sold carnations 
and sponsored the First Annual Sing-A- 
Long Program. 

Even so, many activities were pushed 
aside and left undone because there 
wasn't enough time to complete every- 
thing planned. Student Council Presi- 
dent Wes Gainey blames part of this on 
the teachers strike at the beginning of 
the school year. Several projects, in- 
cluding three pep rallies, that had been 
planned since summer were put off. 

Wes felt that student participation 
was higher this year than ever before. 
However, he regrets the fact that many 



students were not better informed of 
the Student Council's actions. Gainey 
does believe that much of the student 
participation is because the students 
and administration can relate to each 
other better. 

Wes said that the Student Council 
had more activities for this year and 
was looking forward to support from 
the student body. "They can only be 
successful if the student body makes 
them successful," Gainey stated. 

OFFICERS 

President— Wes Gainey 
Vice-President— Charles Benberry 
Secretary— Kerry Hallam 
Treasurer— Doneva Wheeler 
Parliamentarian— Tony Black 
Appointees— Dorria Ball, Jennifer 
Chamman, Paul Huston, Chip Jacobs, 
David Jordan, Mike Mulcahy, Priscilla 
Perkins, and Phaedra Williams. 

by Caroly A. Terry/photos Stewart/ 
Brian Stucker 




The Student Council Cabinet. Front Row: Tony 
Black, Doneva Wheeler, Kerry Hallam, Charles Bi- 
nberry, Wes Gainey. Back Row: Chip Jacobs, Da- 



vid Jordan, Paul Huston, Priscilla Perkins, Jeff 
Opel, Phaedra Williams, Mike Mulcahy, Dorria 
Ball. 



Homecoming fireworks display is always a sight to 
see. Every year S.C. collects funds from the stu- 
dents for the show. 



98/Student Council 





Wes Gainey was the president of the council. Wes 
is pictured here with his cabinet. 

During the bi-monthly council meeting, senior, 
Jeff Shriver, the other half of the Blitz Brothers, 
does what he knows best. 



Student Council/99 



Key Club Full of New Ideas 



| wenty new students joined Key 
Club. The officers were President Kathy 
Turner, Co-Vice-presidents Jennifer 
Chapman and David Jordan, Secretary 
Phaedra Williams, and Treasurer Peter 
Riley. Class representatives were senior 
Tony Black, junior Priscilla Perkins, and 
sophomore Kristie Hutzler. 

"At a recent membership drive there 
were twenty new members. Many stu- 
dents would like to know how the mem- 
bers are selected. The student is first 
nominated by a teacher from one of his 
classes, then a committee holds a meet- 
ing which is led by the second Vice- 
president. From there he reviews the 
nominations and sends letters to the 



students. It is then up to the student to 
attend meetings if he or she desires to 
be a part of this club," stated club 
President Kathy Turner. 

Key Club is the high school group 
dedicated to community service. New 
ideas were discussed and basic plans for 
an activity were formed in monthly 
board meetings. 

The sponsor of the club is the North- 
eastwood Kiwanis. The faculty sponsor 
was Mr. David Otto. He gave the club 
advice on how to organize the projects. 
It was with his help that the club's 
projects became successful. 

by Theresa Hupp 




Cans poured into the Key Club can drive. Much 
individual effort went into collecting enough cans 
for 100 families. 



100/ Key Club 



The National Guard was called out and set all to 
rights. Brand names became visible: Campbells, 
Shurfine, Stokley VanCamp and DelMonte, for 
sure. 




Wes Gainey accepted an award at the annual 
banquet for Marshall being one of the out- 
standing clubs in the state. 




Escorting the local children to see Santa Claus 
was just one of the many activities taken up by 
the Key Club. 



Key Club/101 



No Nukes Is Good Nukes 



RADIATION KILLS 



suffering. 



LETHAL TRASH 



No single industry threatens survival 
or the quality of our lives with such bru- 
tal finality as atomic power. 

Even during "normal" operations, all 
nuclear reactors emit radiation which 
causes cancer, leukemia and birth de- 
fects. It takes just one radioactive 
atom, and one mutated cell to cause a 
fatal case of cancer. 

It doesn't take a meltdown for nu- 
clear power to kill. Radiation can injure 
the genetic coding in sperm and egg 
cells, leading to defects among unborn 
children to come. 

The attack of radiation on our cells is 
cumulative. The more we get, the 
greater our chances of incurring cancer. 

The continued production of these 
deadly rays constitutes an involuntary 
experiment with the health and safety 
of us all. We can't continue this radio- 
active assault without expecting the 
worst for this and future generations. 

NUCLEAR MURDER 

: 0n the evening of November 13, 
1974, Karen Silkwood, a 27-year-old 
union organizer and a mother of three, 
was driving along Oklahoma Highway 
74. She was en route to a meeting with 
a NEW YORK TIMES reporter and an 
official of her union, the Oil, Chemical 
and Atomic workers. For the previous 
six weeks she had been secretly gather- 
ing evidence of unsafe and illegal prac- 
tices at her workplace, the Kerr-McGee 
Plutonium factory, 20 miles from Okla- 
homa City. Her findings were on the 
seat beside her. 

But on her way, Karen's lightweight 
Honda swerved off the road, hit a con- 
crete abutment and crashed, killing her 
instantly. The Oklahoma Highway Patrol 
ruled she had fallen asleep at the wheel, 
but an investigator hired by the OCAW 
found evidence Karen's car had been 
pushed off the road. The documents she 
was carrying mysteriously disappeared. 

In 1979, four years after her death 
U.S. District Judge Frank Theis opened 
Karen's case on charges that her apart- 
ment had been contaminated with 
deadly plutonium in attempt to terrorize 
her. On May 16, a jury of three men 
and three women awarded the Silkwood 
family $500,00 as compensation for her 



MUSE 

MUSE (Musicians United for Safe 
Energy) is a group of artists and activ- 
ists working for a future built on the 
natural power of the sun and for an end 
to the threat of atomic power plants 
and nuclear weapons. For five days, 
September 19-23, 1979, a benefit con- 
cert was at Madison Square Garden 
working for a non-nuclear future. A 
three album project along with a motion 
picture was produced in which all pro- 
ceeds go to pro-solar and anti-nuclear 
groups around the country. 

The performers on the album have 
strong feelings on their anti-nuclear in- 
volvement. Jackson Browne, board 
member of the MUSE foundation, 
stated, "We have to educate each 
other, and I think we have to take con- 
trol while we still have the chance to. 
And if we don't maybe we don't deserve 
to be here. We can just go ahead and 
let the mutant sponges inherit the 
earth." 

Another MUSE member, James Tay- 
lor proved his feelings by stating, "It's 
the whole economy. Weapons are the 
main thing the world is building aside 
from houses and automobiles for Amer- 
icans. It's a world that's building itself a 
really super firecracker." 

MELTDOWN 

"Three Mile Island is the best known 
reactor accident. But it was neither the 
first nor the worst. Time and again, hu- 
man error, poor design, shoddy con- 
struction and cost-cutting by reactor 
owners have brought us to the brink of 
atomic catastrophe. 

One of the first major accidents came 
in October 1957, when uranium fuel 
caught fire in the core of the Windscale 
reactor in northern England. Tempera- 
ture readings, and monitors at the top 
of the plant's emission towers showed 
that radioactive gases were pouring into 
the countryside. Instruments in London, 
miles away, soon recorded 300 rads of 
abnormal radiation. 

Three Mile Island showed that a ma- 
jor reactor catastrophe can happen and 
can threaten millions of lives and bi- 
llions of dollars in property damage. 



All nuclearVeactors produce 
enormous quantities of "fiendishly 
toxic" waste. Plutonium, the deadliest 
of these wastes, remains dangerously 
radioactive for 240,000 years. It must 
be stored to perfection forever. Large 
quantities have already leaked into the 
enviroment. Thousands of pounds are 
being created everyday, and no safe 
disposal system is operable. 

Deadly radioactive materials travel on 
interstate highways, on our railroads 
and through our airports everyday. 
Three million packages of nuclear fuel, 
medical isotopes and atomic wastes 
move through the U.S. each year. The 
NRC says the number of such ship- 
ments will quadruple by 1985. 

From 1946 to 1962 more than 
47,000 barrels of waste from the nu- 
clear weapons program were dumped in 
the Pacific Ocean off the Farallon Is- 
lands, 35 miles west of San Francisco. 
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 
experts now say a quarter of those 
drums have already leaked, con- 
taminating the ocean and the marine 
life. 

A SOLAR FUTURE 

Now that we have entered the 
eighties it is time to ponder the situ- 
ation of our energy sources. The kind of 
society we can have with solar power 
will be far healthier and more stable 
than the one we have now. The key to 
the solar transition is to cut back on 
waste. We throw away fully half the en- 
ergy we now use— twelve times what we 
get from the nukes. Turning to solar 
power will give us energy independence, 
cut inflation and create safe, clean, per- 
manent community based jobs. 

by Pam Lloyd 



Indicates information taken from No Nukes tab- 
loid from the MUSE three album project. 

The feeling expressed in this story are those of 
the co-editors-in chief of the Marhiscan. 



102/Nukes 




James Taylor and Carly Simon got together to 
sing Bob Dylan's song "The Times They are a 
Changin' " and Carly's hit "Mockingbird". 





ICUtir 



Tn the "No Nukes" concert in New York spon- 
sored by MUSE Jackson Browne and Bruce 
Springsteen lit up the stage and riled up the au- 
dience with Jackson's popular rendition of 
"Stay". 




Earning Money Can Be Fun, Necessary 



D 



airy Queen, Bloodgood's Photo- 
graphic Emporium, MCL Cafeteria, and 
WNAP radio station are only a few com- 
panies that may interest teenagers look- 
ing for work. 

Most companies pay students at least 
the minimum wage of $2.90 to start, 
but others pay more than the required 
wage. Preston Cosby relates that the 
hours spent on his job at WNAP vary. 
David Mogollon, Chris Mitchell and She- 
ryl Neal report that they work between 
10-30 hours a week at their jobs. 

The paycheck is cashed and used for 
purchasing such things as records, but 
some teenagers also have the responsi- 
bility of putting that $1+ a gallon gas 
in the car. Preston Cosby is able to put 



a part of his salary into the bank. 

Teenagers should keep distance in 
mind when applying for work so that 
they do not spend all their earnings on 
gasoline. Teenagers who do not have 
their own cars, like Chris and David, rely 
on family and friends for transportation 
to and from work. 

Naturally, everyone works to earn 
money, but the students also report 
that they enjoy their jobs and believe 
working is fun. Most of them feel that 
work has not interfered with school and 
all are able to participate in activities 
such as cross country, yearbook, school 
newspaper, and personal interests such 
as concerts. 

David has worked for two months, 



Chris one month, Sheryl for seven 
months and Preston has been with 
WNAP for a year and a half. All except 
Sheryl have had other jobs before. 
None of the companies mentioned hire 
persons younger than 16. 

Whenever a student is looking for a 
job, he should consider several things. 
For example, make sure the company is 
not too far from home and that they 
can give you hours that will not conflict 
with school. Also, be sure you still have 
time for personal interests and activi- 
ties. 

By Ronnie Hanson, Kim Wilson 







Senior Vickie Reynolds earns her extra cash work- 
ing as a sales girl at UNO jewelry boutique. 



104/Jobs 



Senior Lynne Fisher helps out a customer while 
working after school at Washington Square. 




Jobs/105 



All Around Mass Confusion 



T 



eachers' picketing, students walk- 
ing out of class, T.V. cameras and inter- 
views and long term negotiations, par- 
ents posing as teachers and all around 
mass confusion— that's what was taking 
place of regular classes the first six 
weeks of the school year. 

All of this was brought about because 
the teachers were not happy with their 
contract and felt the school board was 
manipulating them like puppets. 

The IEA and school board sat down 
to talks in early March. Then in August 
just before the start of school, the 
teachers voted to strike and strike they 
did as more than 65 percent of the 
teachers decided to walk the picket line; 
some of the Metro bus drivers refused 
to cross picket lines, thus forcing stu- 



dents to walk a little farther. 

During the strike Marshall's parking 
lot became a hang-out for students who 
decided to skip a class. But the question 
was asked, "Why should we go to class. 
The teachers weren't there to give us a 
proper education." Many parents were 
called in to substitute for the teachers, 
even parents that didn't even have a 
high school education. Marshall stu- 
dents soon got tired of this and staged 
a walk-out. 

The teachers reported back to school 
Wednesday, October 3. 

On Feb. 21, the report came in. The 
contract returned from the arbitrator. 
No one was totally pleased; but, the ne- 
gotiations for 1979-80 were finished. 



mi Li i kali 
ill 




Dave Roberts and Joyce Sausser take a few 
minutes to relax and discuss the negotiations be- 
tween the teachers and the school board. 



Don Tuttle, Dave Roberts, (portraying the Un- 
known Comic), and Linda Breyer pose for a pic- 
ture during the six-week teacher's strike. 



106/Strike 



1NDIANAP0I 



TEACHERS 



STRIKE 



I.E.A. 




Though schools were kept open, many students Since the teaching staff was severely depleted, 
refused to attend, enjoying the extra days of several students stayed outside to soak up the 

summer vacation. last few days of the summer sun. 



Strike/107 



Marshall Law 
Salutes People 

j he student body, the faculty, and 
faculty aids, administrators and deans, 
and security guards— these are the 
people that bring the Sports, Activities, 
and Academics together and make us 
proud. 




Randy Smith's blue tongue, although you can't 
see it, was the result of trying to catch the few 
snowflakes we received this winter from Jack 
Frost. 

The entree for the day and the slow-moving lines 
enthused the students to really "pig out" by the 
time they got their food. 

Taking his usual seat in class, Kevin Perkins 
makes a fool of himself. Kevin went to Terre 
Haute and was missed. Hi, Kevin, wherever you 
are. 




108/People 




eople/109 



Always Eager 
to Help Pats 
J 

^0 ohn Marshall has on its staff 
people whose duty it is to direct and as- 
sist students in career choices and pro- 
grams. Deans and counselors are always 
eager to help pupils with questions and 
personal problems. 

To introduce newcomers to the 
school, the administrative staff includes 
Principal Thomas Haynes and Vice- 
Principals Fred Jones and James Rode- 
heffer. The dean of girls is Marilyn 
Hardwick and Gloria Dozier is the assis- 
tant. The dean of boys is Pierce Cody 
and George McCool is the assistant. 
Counselors are John Vardaman, Mar- 
jorie Christy, Ben Sanders, and Don 
Austin. 

One facet of the administrators job is 
to develop projects for student partici- 
pation. Some of the projects that were 
available this year were, the Home- 
coming Dance, which included a big 
sound system and light show. Senior 
girls had a chance of playing Pow- 
derpuff Football. All classes worked 
hard on their Homecoming Floats. 




Principal Haynes takes a break from his daily 
work to have his picture taken. 



Mr. Jones helps Mrs. Powell answer a question at 
the switch board in the main office. 



110/Administration 




Mr. McCool gives student advice during biology. 
He found himself teaching science during the 
strike. Other Deans are pictured — Marilyn Hard- 
wick, Gloria Dozier, Pierce Cody. 



At the beginning of each semester Mr. Rodeheffer 
and others in the administrations office makes 
schedule changes. 



Mrs. Christy, the junior counselor, helps students 
make schedules for the following semester. 



Administration/111 



Rev On The Red Line 



c 

^f enior Gary Olson has a '67 Barra- 
cuda with a 340 engine. Gary doesn't 
drive his car much, but when he does 
he has to use airplane fuel. Airplane 
fuel is 115% octane and the highest 
octane gas for cars you can buy is Pre- 
mium which is 92%. "They both cost 
about the same," Gary stated, "but air- 
plane fuel gives better performance and 
eliminates knocks and pings." 

Gary's Cruisin' 'Cuda was in the 1980 
World of Wheels auto show at the Con- 
vention Center. Last year the 'Cuda was 
in the Car Craft Nationals. Gary has also 
made arrangements with Car Craft 
Magazine to feature photos of his cars 
sometime this year. 

Gary bought his car 4 years ago for 
$400. He says, "It was a piece of junk 
when I bought it, but I put my life sav- 
ings and a lot of hard work into it." It 
certainly shows Barkdull is another se- 



nior whose hobby is making fast, show 
cars out of older model cars. Mitch has 
a '67 Chevelle with a 327 engine, it has 
a 4-speed transmission, with a Hurst 
Vertigate speed shifter. Mitch drives his 
Chevy daily, but he is planning on buy- 
ing another car for everyday use so he 
can build up his '67 to the max! 

Mitch has never been in any auto 
shows, but he is planning on entering 
the Street Machine Nationals this June. 
He also hopes to put the Chevy on the 
World of Wheels in a year or two. 

Mitch bought his car last summer for 
$1600; the entire engine had just been 
rebuilt. He has put a lot of time and 
money into it, but he anticipates much 
more before the year is up. 

by Kate Weir/photos by Weir, Newman, 
Barkdull 





In the World of Wheels, Gary's engine looks really 
sleek decked out in chrome and dual 4 barrels. 



Gary Olson's '67 Crusin' Cuda is a real show car 
at the World of Wheels in the Convention Center. 
Many oohs and aahs were heard by passersby. 



112/Cars 




Mitch Barkdull's '67 Chevelle is in the process of 
becoming quite a bad ride. Here Mitch's Main 
Squeeze (Kate Weir) poses with Sparky's sharp 
Chevelle. 



Mitch's stock 327 cubic inch Chevy smallblock is 
backed up by Hurst vertigate four speed shifter. 
Not quite ready for World of Wheels . . . but 
close. 



Cars/113 



Senior Year- 
Sounds Good 

Senior year. Sounds good, huh? 
When I was a freshman I thought it 
would never get here, but it came too 
fast. This is the year of decision making. 
What am I going to do the rest of my 
life? What college am I going to attend? 

Aside from all these major decisions, 
my senior year was my best year in high 
school. In the past four years I've made 
so many close friends and learned to 
get along with most teachers. Now just 
when I'm getting used to it, I've got to 
leave. 

Some of us caught "senioritus" long 
before the 500 "they owe us these 
days" cuts. But many of us had started 
the 8-hour work days and daily adult 
hassle of making money and needs 
met. 

Well, our class of 611 has had a good 
four years. We've had a great athletic 
four years, good studies and some good 
parties. What's going to happen after 
we graduate is real important to us, but 
as for now, Go To Hell World, I'm a SE- 
NIOR. 

Starting your high school career is much like be- 
ginning a race— it's two-edged. You run by your- 
self, but your finish reflects on your family and 
your school as well as yourself. 



114/Seniors 




Pam Pinner 
Secretary 




ABNEY, LISA 



ACKERMAN, JAMES 



ACTON, MICHAEL 



ADAMS, DANA 



ADAMS, JOHN 



AHRENS, LARRY 



AITKEN, PAM 



ALDERSON, KEVIN 




ALLEN, ALICE 



ALUMS, CRAIG 



ANDERSON, ANTHONY ARMOU R, TH ERESA 



ARNOLD, DEBORAH 



ARNOLD, JEFF 



ARNOLD, MICHAEL ATKINS, MARCI 



ATKINS, MICHELLE 



BARKDULL, MITCHELL BARNETT, MONICA 



BARTHOLOMEW, DAVID 



ABNEY, LISA-Teacher Asst. 10-12, 

Glee Club 10 

ACKERMAN, JAMES-Gym Asst. 

11-12, Baseball 9-12 

ACTON, MICHAEL 

ADAMS, DANA 




ADAMS, JOHN-ROTC 9-12, Concert 
Choir, Marshallaires, Musicals 
ADAMS, TARITA 
AHRENS, LARRY 
AITKEN, PAMELA-Teacher Asst. 
10-11, Naturalist Club 9-12, Honor 
Society 11-12, Concert Club 10-11 
ALDERSON, KEVIN-Senior Stoney 
Club 12, VICA 11-12 




ALLEN, ALICE-Spanish Club 9-10 

OEA 12 

ALUMS, CRAIG 

ANDERSON, TONY-Science Asst. 9 

ARMOUR, THERESA-French Club 

10, Honor Society, Basketball 9-10, 

Powderpuff Co-Captain 




ARNOLD, DEBORAH 

ARNOLD, JEFFERY-Stage Crew 

11, Cross Country 9-12 

ARNOLD, MICHAEL-Biology Asst. 

10-11, Football 9, Basketball 11-12 

ATKINS, MARCI 




ATKINS, MICHELLE 
BAKER, DEWAYNE 
BAKER, JANICE 

BALL, DORRIA-DE Club 12, History 
Club President 11, Spanish Club 9- 
11, Pres. 10, Newspaper 10-12, Co- 
Editor 12, Student Council 9-12, 
Quill and Scroll, Powderpuff 

BARKDULL, MITCHELL-Chess Club 

9, Letterman's Club, Football 9, 
Track 9-12, let 12, Student Council 
11, VICA 9-12 

BARNETT, BRIAN 

BARNETT, MONICA-Biology Asst. 

10, Naturalist Club 10, Honor So- 
ciety, Z-Club 9, Just Us 11, English 
Asst. 9-12, Key Club 9-12 
BARTHOLOMEW, DAVID-Stage 
Crew 10-11, Football 9. 



Seniors/ 115 



BECK, KELLY-Office Asst. 10-11, 
French Club 9, OEA 12, Patriettes 
10-11, Student Council 9-12, Biol- 
ogy Asst. 11-12 

BEECH LER, DAVID-Biology Asst. 
9-12, Naturalist Club 11-12, Chess 
Club 9-10, Student Council 9-10 
BELL, VICTOR 
BENNETT, WALTER 
BERRY, CHRIS 



BERRY, JAMES-German Club 9-12 
BIDDY, JONATHON-DE Club 12, 
Student Council 10 
BLACK, WILLIAM-Science Asst. 
12, Cheerleader 12, Pep Band 10- 
12, Brass Group 10-12, Concert 
Choir 10-12, Orchestra 9-12, Musi- 
cals 11, Drama Club 11, Spanish 
Club 10, Chess Club 9-10, Newspa- 
per 10-12, ROTC 9-12 
BLACKMAN, DWAYNE 
BLAMEY, BILLY 



BONEBRAKE, BRENDA 
BOWEN, CECIL 
BOWERS, GLENNA 
BOWLING, ANGELIA 
BOWLING, ELLEN-Dean Asst. 9- 
10, Teacher Asst. 11, History Club 
9-10, Stage Crew 11-12 
BRADFORD, KEITH 




BERRY, JAMES 



BERRY, RANDALL 



BLACK, WILLIAM 



BLACKMAN, DWAYNE 




BONEBRAKE, BRENDA 



BOWERS, GLENN 



BRADFORD, WAYNE-Football 10- 
12, Spanish Club 9-12, Student 
Council 9, Track 10-12 
BRADSHAW, BARBARA 
BRANGAN, DAVID-Straw Crew 11- 
12, Thespian Society 11-12 
BREWSTER, BEVERLY-OEA 12, 
Spanish Club 9-10 
BRIGGS, JACQUELINE 
BRIGGS, NANCY-Teacher Asst. 12, 
Naturalist Club 12, Concert Choir 
10-11 



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BRANGAN, DAVID 



BRAWSTER, BEVERLY BRIGGS, NANCY 



BRIGHT, CYNTHIA-DE Club 12, 
Powderpuff 12 

BRINKLEY, JIM-DE Club, Newspa- 
per 11-12, Stage Crew 11-12, Bowl- 
ing Team 10-11 

BRITTON, MARY-Nurse Asst. 12, 
Orchestra 9-12, Musicals 10-12, 
Powderpuff 12 
BRONSTRUP, ROBERT 




BRIGHT, CYNTHIA 



BRINKLEY, JIM 



BRITTON, MARY 



BRONSTRUP, ROBERT 



116/Seniors 




BROOKS, DAVID 

BROOKS, DOYLE L- Basketball 9- 

10, OEA 12 

BROOKS, LINDA-Yearbook 11-12 

BROWN, AMY-Teacher Asst. 10- 

12, History Club 10-12, Concert 

Choir 9-12, Powderpuff 12 



BROOKS, DAVID 



BROOKS, DOYLE 



BROOKS LINDA 



BROWN, AMY 




BROWN, CHARLOTTE BROWN, JAN ETTA 



BUMPAS, RONALD 



ft 
BUSTREO, PAOLO 



CANNON, LEISHA 



BROWN, JULIE 



BROWN, LISA 



BUNKER, MARK 



BURK, PAT 



BURKES, CHARLES 



CALHOUN, BONITA 



CAMPBELL, JUDY 



CAMPBELL, YUMI 



BROWN, CHARLOTTE L.-Track 9- 
12 

BROWN, GEORGE 
BROWN, JANE 

BROWN, JAN ETTA- Powderpuff 12 
BROWN, JULIE 

BROWN, JULIE-History Club 10- 
12, Spanish Club 9-10, Yearbook 
10-11, Student Council 9-12, Pow- 
derpuff 12 
BROWN, LISA 




BUMPAS, RONALD-Teacher Asst. 

11-12, Just Us 10-12, Key Club 9, 

English Club 12 

BUNKER, MARK 

BURK, PATRICIA 

BURKES, CHARLES-ROTC 9-12 




BUSTREO, PAOLO-Cheerleader 12, 
Student Council 12, German Club 12 
BUTLER, DARLEEN 
BUTLER, LIONEL 

CALHOUN, BENITA-Office Asst. 10- 
11, Fashion Show 9, Powderpuff 12 
CAMPBELL, JUDY-Office Asst. 9- 
10, Patriots on PARADE 
CAMPBELL, YU MI 
CANNON, JEROD 




CANNON, LEISHA-Spanish Club 9- 

10, Newspaper 11-12, Yearbook 11- 

12, Track 9,11, Skate Club 9, OEA 

12, Powderpuff 12 

CARDWELL, MONICA 

CAREY, DARRELL-Basketball 11- 

12 

CARTER, DAVID 



CARDWELL, MONICA CAREY, DARRELL 



CARTER, DAVID 



Seniors/117 



CARTER, ERROLL 
CASKY, BRENT 

CASKY, MONIQUE-Basketball 9- 
11, POP 9-11, Homecoming Queen 
Candidate, Prom Princess Candidate 
CHAPMAN, JENNIFER-Marching 
Band 9-11, Marshallaires 11-12, 
Concert Choir 10-12, Musicals 9-12, 
Drama Club 11-12, Z Club 10-12, 
Student Council 9-12, Homecoming 
Queen Candidate, POP 9-12 
CHILCOTE, CYNTHIA-Marching 
Band 10-12, Patriettes 10-12, Pow- 
derpuff 12 
CHILION, SHERREE 



CICENAS, JOE-Teacher Asst. 11, 

Student Council 9 

CLARK, WAYNE-Teacher Asst. 11- 

12, ROTC 9, Football 9-12, Weight 

Lifting Club 9-12, Track 9, Key Club 

9 

CLINE, DEBORAH-Patriettes 9-10, 

Musicals 9-10 

CLINE, (KING) KELLIE 



COLBERT, ROBIN 
COSBY, PRESTON-Teacher Asst. 
10, Newspaper 10-12, Student 
Council 9-10, Speech Team 11 
COUCH, NORMAN-Gym Leader 11, 
12 

COULTER, MELANIE-Science As- 
sistant 9,10,11, POP, DE Club 12, 
Naturalists Club 9,12, Music 9-11, 
Music History 11, Music Theory 11, 
Powderpuff 12 
CRAFT, TIM-Track V. 12 
CREEK, KERRY 
CRITTENDEN, HENRY 



CRONIN, CATHY M. -Foreign Lang. 
Off. Asst. 10-12, History Club 10, 
German Club 12, French Club 10-12, 
Service Award 

CUNNINGHAM, AMY-Marching 
Band 9-12, Pep Band 9-11, Concert 
Band 9-11, Powderpuff 12 
CUTSHAW, JOHN-Science Asst. 
11,12, Marching Band 9-11, Pep 
Band 9-11, Symphonic Wind En- 
semble 9-11, Concert Band 9,11, 
Naturalists Club 10,12, German Club 
9,10, Student Council 9-12, Quiz 
Team 11,12, Key Club 9-12 
DANAHER, ANTHONY-Auto Body 
Asst. 12 
DANGERFIELD, JOHN 

DAUGHERTY, TIM-Science Asst. 
11, Concert Choir 11,12, Musicals 
10, POP 11-12, Football 9-12, 
Baseball 9-12, Boys Chorus 
DAVIDS, ROBERT-Foreign Lang. 
Asst. 9-12, Student Council 9-12, 
Basketball 9-11, Powderpuff King 
DAVIS, DARYL 

DAVIS, DONALD-French Club 9, 
Stage Crew 11, Most Valuable 
Bowler '78 




w-Wi 

CARTER, ERROLL 



m %%m Its 4 

CASKY, BRENT CASKY, MONIQUE CHILCOTE, CYNTHIA 




CICENAS, JOSEPH 



CLARK, WAYNE 



CLINE, DEBORAH 



CLINE, KELLIE 




COLBERT, ROBIN 



COSBY, PRESTON 



COULTER, MELANIE CREEK, KERRY 




CRONIN, CATHERINE 



CUNNINGHAM, AMY CUTSHAW, JOHN 



DANAHER, ANTHONY 




DAUGHERTY, TIM DAVIDS, ROBERT DAVIS, DARYL DAVIS, DONALD 



118/Seniors 




DAVIS, JAY 



DAVIS, PAUL 



DAVIS, TERRY 



DAVISON, RUSSELL 



DEAVER, GEORGE 



DAVIS, TONYA 




DAVIS, JAY-Spanish Club 11, 
French Club 9,10, Stage Crew 11,12, 
Football 9,10, Thespians 11,12 
DAVIS, TERRY L.-ROTC 10, Comp. 
Math Certif. 10 

DAVIS, TONYA R.-ROTC 9, Na- 
tional Honor Soc. 10 
DAVIS, VIRGIL 



DEER, KRISTY 



DEVORE, MARY 



DAVISON, RUSSEL-Science Asst. 
11, Marching Band 9-12, Pep Band 
9-12, Concert Band 9-12, Orchestra 

11, Musicals 11,12, Patriots on Pa- 
rade 10, French Club 9-12, Student 
Council 12, Just Us 12 
DEARDUFF, RICK 

DEAVER, GEORGE-Woodshop Asst. 
9,10, Naturalists Club 10, Chess 
Club 10, Stage Crew 10, Track 9,10 
DEER, KRISTY S. -Science Asst. 
10-12, Patriots on Parade 9, Natu- 
ralist Club 10-12, Basketball 9-12, 
Golf 12, Powderpuff 12 
DEVORE, MARY-Naturalists Club 

12, Student Council 9,10, Basketball 
9-12, Golf 12, Powderpuff Captain 
12 





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DISSER, LYNN RENEE-Counseler 

Asst. 10, DE Club 12, Swimming 10 

DOBBS, BILLY 

DODD, CYNTHIA-French Club 11, 

Student Council 9,10, Powderpuff 

12 

DOLES, DENISE-Office Asst. 9-11, 

Powderpuff 12 



DISSER, RENEE 



DOBBS, BILLY 



DODD, CYNTHIA 



DOLES, DENISE 




DOUGLAS, STARLA 

DOWDELL, CATHY 

DRAKE, CINDY-Art Club 9-12, DE 

Club 12, Latin Club 9, Music Asst. 

10, Powderpuff 

DUFF, ROBIN-Marshallaires 9-12, 

Powderpuff 12, Student Council 9- 

12 

DUFF, ROBYN-Concert Choir 9-12, 

Liberty Belles, POP 

DUNN, JERRY-Marching Band 11- 

12, Pep Band 9-12, Concert Band 9- 

12, Letterman's Club 9,10, Track 9, 

Golf 9 



DOUGLAS, STARLA 



DRAKE, CYNTHIA 



DUFF, ROBYN 



DUNN, JERRY 




EDISON, GANEENE 

EDMONDSON, EFREM 

EDWARDS, KIMBERLY-Pow- 

derpuff 

ELLIS, BARBARA 



EDISON, GANEENE 



EDMONDSON, EFREN 



EDWARDS, KIMBERLY ELLIS, BARBARA 



Seniors/119 



ELLISON, JUDITH 
ENGLAND, LARRY 
ERICKSON, PRISCILLA-Drama 9- 
12, Musicals 9-12, Thespians, Mar- 
shallaires 

ERVIN, BRIAN-Student Council 10, 
Football 9,10 

ERVIN, CAROLE-Gymnastics 9, Of- 
fice Mess. 9,11 




ELLISON, JUDITH 



ERICKSON, PRISCILLA 



ERVIN, BRIAN 



ERVIN, CAROLE 



EVANS, DAVID 

EVANS, LINDA-Office Asst. 10,11 

FAIR, ROBIN 




EVANS, DAVID 



EVANS, LINDA 



FAIR, ROBIN 



FARMER, JOHN 



FENTER, ERIC-Marching Band 9- 
12, Pep Band 9-12, Latin Club 9-11, 
Golf 11,12, Wrestling 11,12 
FERREE, MICHAEL 
FILLENWARTH, BERNARD 
FISCHER, GARY 
FISCHER, SHERRY-Naturalists 
Club 10, Student Council 11, Pho- 
tography 11,12, Fashion Show 10 
FISHER, LYNN-Office Asst. 10, 
French Club 10, Student Council 12, 
Powderpuff 12 



FLUHARTY, JOAN 
FORBIS, DAWN-Naturalists Club 
9,10, Tennis 10,11, Volleyball 9-11 
P.E. Leader 11,12, Powderpuff 12 
FOSTER, JERI-French CIud 
9,10,11, Nat. Honor Soc. 9,10, Z 
Club 9,10, Student Council 9,10 
FOREMAN, ARVIN 




FLUHARTY, JOAN 



FORBIS, DAWN 



FORD, KELLY 



FOSTER, JERI 



FRANKLIN, VICKIE-Naturalists 
Club 9,10 Powderpuff 12, Newspa- 
per 12, Asst. Sports Editor 
FURBEE, KIMBERLY 
GAINES, EDNA 

GAINEY, WESLEY-History Club 9- 
11, Latin Club 9-11, Honor Society 
11-12, Student Council 9-12, Key 
Club President 11, Lt. ov. 12 
GANT, ALEATRICE 




FRANKLIN, VICKIE 



GAINES, EDNA 



GAINEY, WESLEY 



GANT, ALEATRICE 



120/Seniors 




GARRETT, JEFF 



GENTRY, NICOLA 



GERBER, JOHN 



GHOLSTON, LISA 




GILL, LISA 



GILLIAM, GREG 



GINGER, KAREN 



GLOTFELTY, BRIAN 




GOLD,TERRI 



GOLDMAN, JERRY 



GORDEN, ERETHA 



GOREE, MICHAEL 




GRATT, JEAN 



GRAHAM, JOYCE 



GRANT, CHESTER 



GRAY, ROBERT 




GREENWALD, LISA 



GRUNER, PAUL 



GARRETT, JEFFREY 
GENTRY, NICOLA J. -Teacher Asst. 
9, Naturalist Club 10-12, Student 
Council 9-10, Powderpuff 12 
GERBER, JOHN E. -Patriots on Pa- 
rade 10, Spanish Club 10-11, News- 
paper 12, Swimming 10-12, Track 9 
GHOLSTON, LISA— English Club 



GILL, LISA 

GILLARD, WILLIE-Football 9-11 

GILLIAM, GREGORY 

GINGER, KAREN-Office Asst. 10, 

Cheerleader 9,10,12, Naturalist Club 

10-12, Gymnastics 10, Powderpuff 

GLOTFELTY, BRIAN-Concert Choir 

11-12, Patriots on Parade 11-12, 

Yearbook 10-12, Cross Country 10- 

12 



GOLD, TERRI 

GOLDMAN, JERRY-Publications 

10-12 

GORDAN, ERETHA 

GOREE, MICHAEL 



GRAAT, ALICE-Teacher Asst. 9-11, 
Pep Band 9-11, Musicals 10, Patri- 
ettes 9-10, OEA Club President 
GRAHAM, JOYCE 
GRANT, CHESTER 
GRAY, ROBERT-Concert Choir 10- 
12, Musicals 10,12, Latin Club 9-12, 
Honor Society 12, Student Council 
9, Just Us 11, Sons of Liberty 10- 
12, Co-Pres. Choir 



GREENWALD, LISA K.-Cheerleader 
9-12, Naturalist Club 9-12, Honor 
Society 11-12, Student Council 9- 
12, Z Club 9-12, Homecoming 
Queen Candidate 12, Prom Comm. 
12, Powderpuff 12, Human Rela- 
tions Comm. 12 
GREGORY, TOMMY 
GRUNER, PAUL 

GUTIERREZ, LINDA-Dean Asst. 12, 
Powderpuff 12 

GWALTNEY, NORMAN-German 
Asst. 10-11, German Club 9-12, 
Soccer Club 9,12, Secretary Ger- 
many Club 12 



GUTIERREZ, LINDA 



GWALTNEY, NORMAN 



Seniors/121 



HALL, DAMON 

HALL, DIANNA 

HALL, KIM-Concert Choir 10,11, 

Liberty Bells 10, Musicals 10,11, 

Patriots on Parade 10,11, Honor 

Society 11,12, Z Club 9, Student 

Council 9-10, Patriot Personality, 

Powderpuff 12 

HALL, VEON-Office Asst. 11, Let- 

terman's Club 11, Basketball 10-11, 

Track 9-11, Boys State Track 11 




HALL, DAMON 



HALL, DIANNA 



HALL, KIM 



HALL, VEON 



HALLAM, KERRY-Naturalist Club 
9-11, Student Council 9-12, Volley- 
ball 10-11, Student Council Secre- 
tary, Homecoming Queen, Prom 
Princess, Powderpuff 12 
HAMMOND, BOB 
HARRIS, TRACY 
HARRISON, ERIK-Basketball 12 




HALLAM, KERRY 



HAMMOND, PAUL 



HARRIS, TRACY 



HARRISON, ERIC 



HARTMAN, GEORGE C. -Soccer 9 
HASKETT, BRIAN-Naturalist Club 
9-12, Football 9, Wrestling 9 
HASSOS, KAREN 
HAWKINS, GERALD 
HAYS, CYNTHIA-POP, Marshall- 
aires 

HIBBERT, JACKIE-Track 9-10, 
Powderpuff 12 




HARTMAN, GEORGE 



HASKETT, BRIAN 



HAYS, CYNTHIA 



HIBBERT, JACKIE 



HICKMAN, VICKY 
HIDALGO, JUAN 
HIGGS, ROBIN 
HIGHTSHOE, JAMES 
HILL, GREAGORY 




HICKMAN, VICKY 



HIDALGO, JUAN 



HIGGS, ROBIN 



HILL, GREG 



HILL, LISA-Office Asst. 9-11, His- 
tory Club 9, Naturalist Club 10 
HILLIARD, TAWANA 
HOBBS, JEFFREY 
HOBBS, STEVE-Library Asst. 12, 
Orchestra 9, WAR Games 9-12, 
Stage Crew 12 




HILL, LISA 



HILL, MICHAEL 



HOBBS, JEFF 



HOBBS, STEVE 



122/Seniors 




HOFFMAN, ROBERT 



HOLDEN, SCOTT 



HOOVER, DEBBIE 



Ik 

HOOVER, ALAN 




HOUSTON, DERRICK HUBBARD, TINA 



HUDSON, KARL 



HUDSON, SHARI 




HUNT, AMY 



HURT, STANLEY 



HUSTON, PAUL 



IRVINE, KEITH 





•7/ i 

JACKSON, ARNOLD JACKSON, DERRICK JACOBS, CHIP 



JAROSINSKI, MARK 




HOFFMAN, ROBERT L. — Office Asst. 

9-11, Marching Band 9-12, Pep 

Band 9-12, Symphonic Wind Band 

9-12, Orchestra 9-10, Swimming 10, 

Drum Major 11-12, Outstanding 

Drum Major Award 

HOLDEN, SCOTT-Office Asst. 9-12, 

Naturalist Club 9-10, Baseball 9-12, 

Basketball 9-10 

HOOVER, ALAN-Senior Stoney 

Club 12 

HOOVER, DEBORAH 



HOUSTON, DERRICK-Latin Club 9- 
11, Track 9-12 

HUBBARD, TINA-Dean Asst. 11, 
Spanish Club 9-10, Student Council 
10, Just Us 9, Track 9, Art Award 
Powderpuff 12 
HUDSON, KARL 
HUDSON, SHARI 



HUNT, AMY-Marching Band 9-12, 
Patriettes 9-12, Prom Princess Can- 
didate, Homecoming Queen Candi- 
date, Powderpuff 12 
HUNT, KEVIN-German Club 12, 
Baseball 9-10 
HURT, STANLEY T. 
HUSTON, PAUL 
IRVINE, KEITH 



JACKSON, ARNOLD L-Concert 

Band 9-10, Football 9-12, Wrestling 

9 

JACKSON, DERRICK 

JACOBS, SAMUEL L-Cheerleader 

10-11, Marching Band 9-10, Pep 

Band 9-10, Marshallaires 11-12, 

Concert Choir 10-12, Naturalist Club 

11-12, Drama Club 10-12, Patriots 

on Parade 10-12 

JAROSINSKI, MARK-Naturalist 

Club 10-12, Football 9-12, Baseball 

9, Wrestling 9-111 



JAROSKINSKI, MICHAEL 
JENKINS, PHYLLIS-Teacher Asst. 
11, Powderpuff 12 
JOHNSON, DOUGLAS 
JOHNSON, KIMBERLEY 



JAROSINSKI, MIKE JENKINS, PHYLLIS JOHNSON, DOUG JOHNSON, KIM 



Seniors/123 



JOHNSON, THONYA 

JONES, DEBBIE 

JONES, KEITH-Student Council 9- 

12, Football 9-12, Wrestling 9-12, 

King Candidate 

JORDAN, DAVID W. -Class Pres., 

Key Club Vice Pres., Musicals 10-12, 

French Club 10, Letterman's Club 

11-12, Student Council 10-12 

JUDD, VICKIE 

KEITH, SANDRA D. -Teacher Asst. 

12, History Club 10-11, Spanish 

Club 9-10, Yearbook 11-12, Student 

Council 11, Quill & Scroll 12, Pow- 

derpuff 12, Honor Society 11 



KELLY, JACQUELINE-Skate Club 
9-10, Powderpuff 
KEMNITZ, RUTH 
KENNEDY, KATRINA 
KENNEDY, PATRICIA 



KENNINGTON, DONNA 

KENT, RHONDA 

KERR, JAYNE-Marching Band 9- 

10, Concert Band 9-12, Orchestra 

10-12, Powderpuff 12 

KETT, EDWARD-Cross Country 9- 

10, Track 9-12 

LAKE, VENNESSA 

LANERS, EVA-Office Asst. 11, 

Latin Club 10, Skate Club 10 

LANERS, THERESA 



LANGFORD, RANDALL- Student 

Council 9-11, King Candidate 11, 

Football 9-12, Basketball, Baseball 

9-12, Wrestling 11-12 

LAWLEY, LEO 

LEE, (ANDERSON) ADRIAN 

LEE, CHERYL 

LEE, JOSEPH 

LEE, JULIE-OEA 12 



LEE, TUANITA-Nurse Asst. 9-12, 
Home Ec. Asst. 9-12, Spanish Club 
9, Student Council 9 
LEPSUM, JERILYN-Teacher Asst. 
11-12, History Club 10-11, Natural- 
ist Club 10-12, French Club 9-10 
LESSLY, EDDIE-Cheerleader 11- 
12, Marshallaires 12, Drama Club 
12, German Club 9-12, Student 
Council 12, Letterman Club 12, 
Baseball 9-12, Powderpuff Cheer- 
leader 12 
LESLIE, SHERRY 
LEWIS, WILLIAM-Teacher Asst. 
12, ROTC 10-11 



124/Seniors 




JOHNSON, THONYA 



JONES, DEBBIE 



JONES, KEITH KEITH, SANDRA 




KELLY, JACQUELINE 



KEMNITZ, RUTH 



KENNEDY, KATRINA KENNEDY, PATRICIA 




KENNINGTON, DONNA KENT, RHONDA 



KERR, JAYNE 



KETT, ED 



I 




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LANGFORD, RANDALL LAWLEY, LEO 



LEE, CHERYL 



LEE, JULIE 




LEE, TUANITA 



LEPSCUM, JERILYN 



HHHML KM 

LESSLEY, EDWARD LESLIE, SHERRY 




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LIGHTLE, JULIE 



LINDAUER, BELINDA 



LINDAUER, DEBBIE 



LITSEY, ANDREA 




LLOYD, PAM 



LONIS, JEANETTE 



LOUIS, JESSICA 



LUKICH, MIKE 




MAJOR, NAN 



MARSDEN, TONYA 



MARSH, RICHARD 



MARTIN, BRIAN 



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MARTIN, CINDY 



IcBRIDE, LANDON 



IcCALLISTER, CAROLYN McDONALD, LU ANN 



LIGHTLE, JULIA 
LINDAUER, DEBRA 
LINDAUER, BELINDA-Office Asst. 
9-12, Art. Asst. 9-12, Student 
Council 9, Powderpuff 12 
LITSEY, ANDREA-Teacher Asst. 
10-12, German Club Program direc- 
tor 9-12, Bowling Club 10-12, Trea- 
surer Campus Life 10-11 



LLOYD, PAM-History Club Pres. 9- 

11, French Club 9-10, Yearbook 10- 

12, Editor-in-Chief Quill & Scroll 
Pres. 11-12, Honor Society 11-12, 
Student Council 9-12, Senior Stoney 
Club 12 

LONIS, JEANETTE-French Club 10, 

Z Club 11, OEA 12 

LOUIS, JESSICA-Concert Choir 9- 

10, Honor Society 9-10 

LOWE, DEBRA-Teacher Asst. 12, 

Concert Choir 11, Naturalists Club 9, 

Swimming 9-11 

LUKICH, MICHAEL-French Club 

10, Key Club 10 

LUTOCKA, ELIZABETH-Marching 
Band 9-10, Volleyball 9-12, Basket- 
ball 9-12, Z Club 9-10, Honor So- 
ciety 12, POP 9-11, Concert Choir 
10-11 

MAJOR, NAN-History Club 12, Z 
Club 10, Student Council 12, Pow- 
derpuff, Office Mess. 9-11 
MAJORS, THOMAS-Marching Band 

11, Concert Band 12, ROTC 10, Bas- 
ketball 12 

MARSDEN, TONYA I. -History Club 
9, Student Council 9-10, Skate Club 
9-10, Clothing Fashion Show 9, 
Powderpuff, Office Asst. 
MARSH, RICHARD-Golf 9-12 
MARTIN, BRIAN P. -Teacher Asst. 
9-10, Key Club 12, POP 10-12, Mu- 
sicals 11-12, Marshallaires 11-12, 
Treasurer Concert Choir 

MARTIN, CYNTHIA-Stage Crew 9- 

12 

MATLOCK, JAMES 

McBRIDE, LANDON-Ofhce Asst. 9- 

12, Letterman Club 10-12, Basket- 
ball 9-12, Baseball 9-12 
McCALLISTER, CAROLYN-Latin 
Club 9, Powderpuff 

Mccarty, dennis 

McDONALD, LUANN-Powderpuff 




McFARLAND, LORI-P.E. Asst. 11- 
12, Basketball 9-12, Volleyball 10- 
12, Teacher Asst. 10, Captain Bas- 
ketball 11 

McGARR, PAUL-ROTC 9-12, Stu- 
dent Council 9-11, K-Club 9-12 
McGILL, LENNE 
McPHERSON, LINDA-Teacher 
Asst. 11-12, German Club 12, 
French Club 11-12, Honor Society 
11-12 

MEALS, ANTHONY 
MEANS, GAIL 
MEDFORD, TOM 



McFARLAND, LORI 



McPHERSON, LINDA 



MEALS, ANTHONY 



MEDFORD, TOM 



Seniors/125 



MELLING, FELINA 
MERRIWEATHER, KEITH 
MESIANA, JOE-Football 9, Wres- 
tling 9, Baseball 9 
MEYER, MICHAEL J. -POP 11-12, 
German Club 9-12, ROTC 9, KEY 
Club 10-12 
MILLER, CYNTHIA 
MILLER, RICHARD 



MILLER, YVETTE-History Club 11- 

12 

MILLER, YVONNE-History Club 

11-12 

MITCHELL, DAVID 

MIX, DARRELL 

MOBLEY, BARBARA 



MOFFITT, GREG 

MOORE, JOYCE 

MOORE, MARK 

MORRIS, LEANNE-Ofnce Asst. 9- 

10, Teacher Asst. 11, Naturalists 

Club 10, Patriettes 9-12 Captain 12, 

Queen Candidate, Student Council 

10, Honor Society 11-12, Z Club 9- 

10 



MULCAHY, MICHAEL-Marshall- 
aires 12, Concert Choir 10-12, MU- 
SICALS 10-12, POP 10-12, Natural- 
ist Club 10-12, Yearbook 11, Track 
11 

MULLINS, LARRY 
MURRAY, KELVIN 
MURRAY, VALERIE 



MYERS, STEPHANIE-Teacher 
Asst. 10, Student Council 11, Fash- 
ion Shows 10-11 
NANCE, WAVIE 

NEAL, MADONNA-Teacher Asst. 
12, French Club 9-10, JUST US 10, 
Vice-President OEA 12 
NEWBY, LINDA 

NEWELL, WILLIAM-Teacher Asst. 
11-12, Student Council 12, Stage 
Crew 11 




MELLING, FELINA 



IESIANA, JOE 



MEYER, MICHAEL 



MILLER, CINDY 




MILLER, YVETTE 



1ILLER, YVONNE 



IITCHELL, DAVID 



MOBLEY, BARBARA 




MOFFITT, GREG 



MOORE, CELESTA 



MOORE, JOYCE 



MORRIS, LEANNE 




MULCAHY, MIKE 



MULLINS, LARRY 



MURRAY, KEVIN 



1URRAY, VALERIE 




MYERS, STEPHANIE 



NEAL, MADONNA 



NEWBY, LINDA 



NEWELL, WILLIAM 



126/Seniors 




NEWMAN, JEFF 



NICHOLS, ERNEST 



NOVOTNY, JILL 



O'KEEFE, JOEL 



OPEL, JEFF 



OUTLAW, GREG 



OWINGS, GRETTA PAFF, DOUG 



NEWMAN, JEFF-Student Council 

12, Wrestling 10, Key Club 9-10, 

Football Manager 9 

NICHOLS, ERNEST 

NOVOTNY, JILL 

O'KEEFE, JOEL-Teacher Asst. 11 

OLSON, GARY 




OPEL, JEFFREY-Spanish Club 9, 
Newspaper 9-12, Co-Editor 12, Quill 
& Scroll 12, Letterman's Club 9, 
Tennis 9-12, Swimming 9-10, Stu- 
dent Council 12, Outstanding Under- 
class Journalist 10-11 
OUTLAW, GREGORY--DE Club 12, 
History Club 12, Student Council 
11-12, Skate Club 9-10 
OWINGS, GRETTA-Concert Band 9, 
French Club 9-10 
PAFF, DOUG H.-ROTC 9-12, Stu- 
dent Council 9-10, Letterman's Club 
10-12, Key Club 10, Football Man- 
ager 9-12 




PARKER, BERNADETTA PARROTT, BRIAN 



PARROTT, EDWARD 



PATE, AARON 



B (J 

PEASE, JACQUELINE PHIPPS, MIKE 



PITCHER, LORI 



PITTMAN, KIMBERLY 



PLANT, LEATRICE 



POND, TERRI 



PONTO, DONNA POSLEY, BEVERLY 



PARKER, BERNADETTA 
PARROTT, BRIAN 
PARROTT, EDWARD C 
PATE, AARON 
PATRICK, CAROLYN 





PEASE, JACQUELINE-German 

Club 9-12, Newspaper 10-12, 

Speech Team 10 

PEDERSEN, CHRISTOPHER 

PHILLIPS, DAVID 

PHILLIPS, HARRY 

PHILLIPS, RONALD 

PHIPPS, MIKE 

PINNER, PAMELA F. -Spanish Club 

10, Student Council 9-12, Just Us 

10, Key Club 11-12, Track Manager 

9, Skate Club 9, Powderpuff 12, 
Homecoming Queen Candidate, 
Class Secretary 

PITCHER, LORIE-Office Mess. 9- 

10, Powderpuff 12 
PITTMAN, KIMBERLY 

PLANT, LEATRICE-Powderpuff 

PLATT, RICHARD 

POND, TERRI 

PONTO, DONNA-Dean Asst. 12, 

Latin Club 11, Powderpuff 12 

POSLEY, BEVERLY 



SENIORS/127 



POWELL, CRAIG-History Club 9- 

10, Naturalist Club 10-12 

PRICE, SCOTT-Teacher Asst. 9-11, 

Cheerleader 12, Marching Band 9- 

12, Musicals 9-11, Drama Club 9, 

Naturalist Club 9-10, Key Club 11- 

12, Powderpuff Cheerleader 12, 

Stage Crew 9-11 

PRITCHETT, SUSAN 

PROFFITT, STEVEN 

PURCELL, JOHN-German Club 9- 

12, Honor Society 11-12, Key Club 

9-10 

QUARLES, ANDRE 



QUINN, VICTORIA 
QUINTERO, EDWARD-Student 
Council 9-12, Dean's Mess. 9-11 
RALSTON, LINDA E. -Teacher Asst. 
11-12, March Band 9-10, Pep Band 
9-10, Musicals 9, Newspaper 10 
REINERT, SUSAN 
REYNOLDS, VICTORIA L.-Office 
Asst. 9-12, Powderpuff 12, Z Club 9, 
Naturalists Club 9-10, Latin 11 



RICHMAN, STEVE 

RIFNER, PAUL-ROTC 9-12, Stage 

Crew 11, Track 9-10 

RIFNER, PETER-French Club 9-10, 

ROTC 9-12, Cross Country 9-10, 

Color Guard 10-12 




POWELL, CRAIG 



PRICE, SCOTT 



PROFITT, STEVEN 



PURCELL, JOHN 




QUINN, VICTORIA 



QUINTERO, EDDIE 



RALSTON, LINDA REYNOLDS, VICKIE 




RICHMAN, STEVE 



RIFNER, PAUL 



RIFNER, PETER 



RILEY, PETER 



RILEY, PETER W.-Teacher Asst. 
12, Concert Choir 11-12, Musicals 
10-12, French Club Treasurer 11- 
12, Honor Society 12, Student 
Council 12, Quiz Team 10-12 
NMSQT Finalist 

RILEY, THOMAS-History Club 10, 
Student Council 11, Football 9, 
Track 12, Coach Asst. 
RIVES, HILDA L 
ROAKE, MARK-Baseball 9-10 
ROBERTS, CHERI A.-DE Club 12 





LfcV 4 : ! 




RILEY, WILLIE 



RIVES, HILDA 



ROAKE, MARK 



ROBERTS, CHERI 



ROBERTS, PETER-Teacher Asst. 

11 

ROBERTSON, ANGIE-Teacher Asst. 

10-12, History Club 9, French Club 

9-10, Matmaids Captain 11-12, 

Powderpuff 12 

ROBERTSON, KEITH 

ROBINSON, CLARA 




ROBERTS, PETE 



ROBERTSON, ANGIE 



ROBERTSON, KEITH ROBINSON, CLARA 



128/Seniors 




RODGERS, SHELLI 



ROSS, LINDA 



RUDD, JULIE 



RUDD, RICHARD 



RUSSELL, JOHN 



RUTLAND, TERRI 



SANDEFUR, MARTHA 



SATTERFIELD, MIKE 



SCHEIBELHUT, ROSE 



SCHLIMGEW, MATT SCOTT, JOH NATHAN SHAFFER, JU LIE 



SIMMONS, MICHAEL 



SIMMONS, QUINTON SMITH, JOAN 



SMITH, KENNETH 



ROGERS, SHELLI President DE 
Club 12, Powderpuff 12, Photogra- 
phy 12 

ROSS, LINDA-Just Us 10 
RUDD, JULIE-Marching Band 9- 
11, Pep Band 9-10, Concert Band 9- 
11, French Club 9, Student Council 
9-10, OEA 12, Powderpuff 
RUDD, RICHARD -Teacher Asst. 12, 
History Club 11-12, Key Club 9-10, 
Bowling 12, English Club 12 
RUSOMAROFF, MELETCA 





RUSSELL, JOHN D.-Teacher Asst. 
12, German Club 9-11, War Games 
Club 9-12 
RUSSELL, MARY 
RUTLAND, TERRI 

SANDEFUR, MARTHA 
SATTERFIELD, MICHAEL-Human 
Relations 9-12, Student Council 9- 
10, POP 9-10, Musicals 9-10, Pep 
Band 9-11, Concert Band 9-11, Or- 
chestra 9-12, Powderpuff Cheer- 
leader 



SCHEIBELHUT, ROSE-Teacher 

Asst. 10,12, Naturalist Club 11-12, 

French Club Vice-President 9-12, 

Just Us 12 

SCHLIMGEN, MATT-Football 9-12, 

Track 11-12, Wrestling 9, Baseball 9 

SCHWEIGEL, DEBRA 

SCOTT, JAMESETTA 

SCOTT, JOHNATHAN 

SCROGGINS, MARK 

SHAFFER, JULIE 




SHANKLIN, KIMBERLY 
SHRIVER, JEFFERY-Naturalist 
Club 10, Wrestling 9-12 
SICKING, CHARLES-Teacher Asst. 

11, ICT Club 12, Naturalist Club 10- 

12, Student Council 10, Football 10, 
Wrestling 9-10, Mock Election Pres- 
ident 12, Academic Congress 11 
SIMMONS, JAMIE-Nurse Asst. 10- 
12, Powderpuff, Concert Choir 10- 
11, POP 10-11 



SIMMONS, MICHAEL Q. -Teacher 
Asst. 11, History Club 9-12, Latin 
Club 11, Spanish Club 9-10, Student 
Council 9-11, Skate Club 9-10, 
Prom Prince Candidate 
SIMMONS, QUENTIN L.-History 
Club 12, Yearbook 10-12, ROTC 
Club 11-12, Drill Team, 10-12, Color 
Guard 11-12, Key Club Historian 
SMITH, DONALD 

SMITH, JOAN-Glee Club 10, Con- 
cert Choir 9 
SMITH, KEITH 

SMITH, KENNETH W.-Teacher 
Asst. 11-12, Basketball 9-10 
SMITH, LARRY-Teacher Asst. 11, 
Wrestling 9-10 

SMITH, DONALD-ROTC 9-12, Drill 
Team 11-12 
SMITH, MERVIN 
SMITH, SHEILA 



Seniors/129 



SMITH, TAMMY S. -Teacher Asst. 
11, Concert Choir 12, POP 12, 
Spanish Club 9-10, ROTC 9 
SMITH, VALERIE 
SNODGRASS, DERRICK 
SOUTH, MICHAEL 



SOWELL, LARRY 

SPAULDING, JAMES 

SPIRES, SALLY-Office Asst. 9-12, 

French Club 9, Gym Leader 11, 

Powderpuff 

SPRINGER, MARK-Art Asst. 12 



STAHL, MATTHEW 
STEELE, LEE 

STINEMAN, BILL-Teacher Asst. 
10-11, Concert Choir 12, Drama 
Club 11, ROTC 9-12, Rifle Team 10- 
11, Drill Team 10-11 
STITT, LINDA 



STOE, KELLY-History Club 9, Track 

9, Swimming 9-10 

STRONG, CATHERINE 

STRONG, DEBBIE 

STROTHMAN, ROBERT-Naturalist 

Club 11-12, Student Council 11-12, 

Bowling 11,12 

STUBBS, CHRISTOPHER-Spanish 

Club 9, Track 11-12 



SULLIVAN, KAREN 
SULLIVAN, SHARON 
SUTTON, PHILIP-French Club 9- 
10, Automechanic Award 11 
SWINEFORD, DIANNA F. -Cheer- 
leader 9-12, DE 12, Student Council 
9-10, Track 9-12, Gymnastics 10- 
12, Homecoming Queen Candidate, 
Powderpuff 




SMITH, TAMMY 



SMITH, VALERIE 



SNODGRASS, DERRICK SOUTH, MIKE 




SOWELL, LARRY 



STOE, KELLY 



SPAULDING, JAMES 



SPIRES, SALLY 



SPRINGER, MARK 




STRONG, CATHY 



STRONG, DEBBIE 



STROTHMANN, ROBERT 




SULLIVAN, KAREN 



SULLIVAN, SHARON 



SUTTON, PHILLIP 



SWINEFORD, DIANNA 



130/Seniors 




TARTER, SCOTT 



TAYLOR, JULIE 



TAYLOR, MISTY 



TERRY, CAROLE 




J *-»•' ' 


**■'. ■ 




" . "*. 


r 




* 






V 


\ 





TILLEY, JUDY 



TONEY, LYNNE 



TORRES, CARRIE 



TRABUE, NIKKI 




TRACY, DEBRA 



TRESTER, JEFF 



TROWBRIDGE, KIMBERLY TURNER, KATHRYN 




TUTTLE, NICK 



TWIGG, MILO 



UHLENHAKE, JANE UTTER, DAN 




TARTER, SCOTT E. -Naturalist Club 

10, Student Council 9,12, Just Us 

President 11 

TAYLOR, JULIE 

TAYLOR, MISTY 

TERRY, CAROLE A.-Ofnce Asst. 10- 

12, Orchestra 9-11, History Club 9- 

12, Honor Society 12, Just Us 11, 

Girl State 11 

THOMPSON, JACK 



TILLEY, JUDY-German Club 10-12, 
Matmaids 10, Powderpuff 
TINSLEY, DELIA M.-Marshallaires 
10-12, POP 9-12 

TONEY, LYNNE-Teacher Asst. 9- 
12, Naturalist Club 9-12, Pow- 
derpuff 12 

TORRENCE, KEITH-Spanish Club 
9-10, Skate Club 9-10 
TORRES, CARRIE-History Club 10, 
Naturalist Club 10-12, Honor So- 
ciety Vice President 11-12, Tennis 9 
TRABUE, NIKKI-Teacher Asst. 10, 
OEA Treasurer 12, Track 9-11, Pow- 
derpuff, Student Council 12 



TRACY, DEBRA 
TRESTER, JEFF 
TROWBRIDGE, KIMBERLY 
TUCKER, CATHERINE 
TUCKER, CLINT-Skate Club 9-10 
TURNER, KATHRYN A.-Teacher 
Asst. 9-12, Naturalist Club 10-12, 
French Club 10, Honor Society 12, 
Student Council 9, Key Club Presi- 
dent 11-12, Powderpuff Biological 
Science Fair 11 



TUTTLE, NICHOLAS L-Naturalist 
Club 10-12, Letterman's Club 9-12, 
Wrestling 9-12 

TWIGG, MILO-Teacher Asst. 9-10, 
Just Us 9, Track 12, ROTC 9-10 
UHLENHAKE, JANE-Teacher Asst. 
9, Naturalist 10, History Club 9 
UTTER, DANIEL-Teacher Asst. 9, 
Chess Club 9, Honor Society 11-12, 
Student Council 9, Key Club 9-10 



VANATTA, RICHARD-Newspaper 

11-12, Swimming 9-10 

VAN CLEVE, SHARON 

VAN DUYN, BRENT-Naturalist 

Club Vice President 10-12, Student 

Council Basketball 9, Tennis 10-12, 

Baseball 9-12, Key Club 9-10 

WADE, GERALD-Art Asst. 10, 

French Club 9-10, Bowling 10, 

Yearbook 12, Football 9 

WALKER, MICHELLE 

WALL, MARSHA-Art Scholarship 

10 



VANATTA, RICHARD 



VAN DUYN, BRENT WALKER, MICHELLE WALL, MARSHA 



Seniors/131 



WALLER, LORI 
WALTERS, MICHELLE 
WAMPLER, CATHY-Art Asst. 11- 
12, Naturalist Club 10, Patriettes 
10-12, Office Mess. 9-10, Pow- 
derpuff 

WARFIELD, WENDY 
WASHINGTON, GREGORY-Latin 
Club 10-11 

WASHINGTON, JAMES-Office 
Mess. 9-12 




WALLER, LORI 



WAMPLER, CATHY 



WARFIELD, WENDY WASHINGTON, JAM ES 



WASHINGTON, TERESA-Office 
Asst. 9-10, Z Club 9-11, Student 
Council 9-12, History Club 9-11, 
First and Second in Clothing Style 
Show 11 

WEEKS, JOHN-Patriots on Parade 
11-12 

WEIR, KATHY-Art Club 9-12, Vice 
President Quill and Scroll, Yearbook 
10-12, Editor-in-Chief, Honor So- 
ciety 12, Student Council 12 
WELCH, LAWANDA-History 10-12, 
Powderpuff, German Club President, 
Key Club 12 




WASHINGTON, TERESA 



WEEKS, JOHN 



WEIR, KATHY 



WELCH, LAWANDA 



WELCH, DEBBIE 
WEST, JOHN 

WESTMORELAND, MICHAEL- 
Marching Band 9, Musicals 9, Bowl- 
ing 9-12 

WEVER, KATHY-Tennis 9-12, Vol- 
leyball 9-11 
WIBBELS, JOHN 
WHEELER, DONEVA-Office Asst. 
9-11, Concert Choir 12, POP 9,12, 
Yearbook 9-12, Student Council 9- 
12, Key Club 11,12, Powderpuff 
WHITAKER, RAYMOND 




WELCH, DEBRA 



WEST, JOHN 



II 
WEVER, KATHY WHITAKER, RAYMOND 



WHITE, FELITA 

WHITE,JAMES-Art Club 9,10, Nat- 
uralist Club 9,10, Football 9-12, 
Baseball 9,10 
WHITE, JANELLE 
WILDRICK, PAMELA 
WILEY, WILLIE 

WILLIAMS, ARETHA-Spanish Club 
10, ROTC 9,10, Track 11, Skate Club 
10, Powderpuff 




WHITE, FELITA 



WHITE, JANETTE 



WHITE, JIM 



WILDRICK, PAM 



WILLIAMS, LARRY-Library Asst. 
10-12, DE Club 12, French Club 
10,11, Student Council 9, Basketball 
10-12 

WILLIAMS, NANCY-DE Club 12, 
Spanish Club 12, Powderpuff 
WILLIAMS, SHIRLISA 
WILLIAMS, STEPHAN 




WILLIAMS, LARRY 



WILLIAMS, NANCY 



WILLIAMS, SHIRLISA WILLIAMS, STEPHEN 



132/Seniors 




WILLIAMSON, GREGORY 
WINDER, RICKEY 
WINFIELD, JEANETTE 
WINSHIP, PAUL 



WILLIAMSON, GREG 



WINDER, RICKEY 



WINFIELD, JEANETTE 



WINSHIP, PAUL 




WILSON, TIARA 

WOHLDORF, SEBASTIAN-German 

Club 12, Student Council 12, Track 

12, Swimming 12, PowderpufT 

Cheerleader 

WOOD, MICHAEL-Newspaper 11- 

12, Track 10, Baseball 10,11 

YARLING, JULIE-Night School 

Asst. 11, DE Club 12, History Club 

9-11, French Club 9,10, Newspaper 

10,11, Stage Crew 10, PowderpufT 

YOUNG, ROBERT 

ZAMORA, RODERICK 



WILSON, TIARA 



WOHLDOLF, SEBESTIAN WOOD, MIKE 



YARLING, JULIE 



Foreign Exchange Students 
Welcomed at JMHS 



A 



mong all the other Marshall stu- 
dents wearing blue jeans and t-shirts, 
they look like all-American boys. But, 
they're really Marshall's foreign ex- 
change students Paolo Bustreo, Sebas- 
tian Waldorf and Andres Alvarez who 
have come to America to study. 

Paolo, 18, comes from Stockholm, 
Sweden. He lives with Nick Tuttle and 
his family. 

Most Marshall students were kind to 
him and welcomed him to the school. 
Some of the differences he's found are 
social. "Friends gather in the living 
room or the kitchen here whereas in 
Sweden, they gather in their own 
rooms." 



"Dating, too, is different," Paolo re- 
lated. "Here girls usually don't ask boys 
out, but in Sweden they do." 

Paolo, who finds little time for his 
hobbies of soccer, reading and ice 
hockey, says he feels his time in the 
U.S. is a dream come true. 

Sebastian Waldorf is from Hamburg, 
Germany. The U.S. was his first choice 
because he was fluent in English, and 
the power of America made it seem in- 
teresting to him. 

While here in the U.S., Sebastian lives 
with senior Keith Jones and his family. 
Although Marshall has more security 
than his old school, he found most of 
Marshall's students have been receptive 



to him. He feels that his year in the 
U.S. will help him because he met many 
wonderful friends and he has learned to 
accept other's opinions. 

Sebastian's hobbies include soccer 
and conversation. He is a member of 
Marshall's swim team. 

While Paolo and Sabastian have been 
at Marshall since August, Marshall's 
third exchange student only arrived in 
January. 

Andres Alvarez from Bogota, Colum- 
bia, lives with Butch and Terri Ramsey's 
family. While being welcomed by most 
students, Andres found many were in- 
quisitive about his homeland. 



Seniors/133 



Juniors Set 
Career Goals 

I he junior year in high school 
seems to be the favorite of many stu- 
dents. They enjoy being juniors because 
they are now "upperclassmen". They 
feel comfortable and are excited about 
coming to the end of their high school 
years. 

The junior year is a time for reflec- 
tion. Students look back on their school 
years and all the fun they have had. 
They recall friendships, parties, teach- 
ers, and many wonderful experiences. 
They also must reflect on the future. 
The junior year is a time for making de- 
cisions. It is a time for making lifetime 
plans and getting "your act together." 

Of all the years spent in school, this is 
probably the most important. Now is 
the time to buckle down to plan college 
or to make definite decisions about ca- 
reers. It is also the most fun. 

Now is the time to enjoy school and 
friends before it is time to say good- 
bye. 





One project that is both fun and a pain in the 
neck is planning and constructing a "winning" 
float. 



With the Carter request for registration of 18-20 
year olds, many students took a new look at the 
recruitment offers. 



134/Juniors 




Abbott, Debbie 
Ackerman, Shelley 
Agee, Christopher 
Alexander, Allan 
Allen, Anthony 
Anderson, Dave 
Anderson, Stacy 
Armour, Ronnie 

Armstrong, Rhonda 
Arnold, Lori 
Arrington, Linda 
Askren, Deborah 
Avra, Paula 
Baker, Michael 
Bales, Susan 
Barclay, Barney 

Barnes, Steven 
Beechler, Bruce 
Bell, Daniel 
Bellinger, Michael 
Benberry, Charles 
Bennett, Tamra 
Berry, Tamara 
Bivens, Tracy 

Black, Richard 
Boone, Carla 
Boyd, Frederic 
Brady, Angela 
Brady, Kent 
Brasher, Cheryl 
Brezausek, Judi 
Brickens, Mark 

Bridgins, William 
Brown, Cassandra 
Brown, Cherry 
Brown, Jeanetta 
Bruce, Raymond 
Bumpas, Dianne 
Burrell, Michelle 
Byerly, Kathy 

Byers, Mary 
Cain, James 
Castor, Jayne 
Chalupa, Donna 
Charpie, Jon 
Cheatham, Sharon 
Christian, Donna 
Churchwell, Vetris 

Clark, Beverly 
Clements, Angela 
Clemons, Clarence 
demons, Clarice 
Cleveland, Rhonda 
Cody, Brenda 
Collins, Tracy 
Conners, Kenneth 

Connor, Daniel 
Coons, James 
Cothern, Jeanette 
Craig, Allison 
Crain, James 
Crayton, Terri 
Cromwell, Dawayne 
Cronin, Margaret 

Crouch, Joyce 
Cruthird, Veronica 
Curry, Tyrone 
Cutter, Nancy 
Daniel, Willie 
Daugherty, Jodonna 
Davis, Betty 
Davis, Frankcena 



Juniors/135 



Day, Leah 
Deer, Kerry 
Degraphenreed, Juan 
Demoss, Antonio 
Denney, Bradley 
Denney, Gregory 
Dennis, Orlando 
Dibbern, Julie 



Diehl, Cindy 
Dillon, Teresa 
Dishner, Aaron 
Donahue, Darby 
Dorsey, James 
Duerson, Ruth 
Duncan, Sally 
Dye, Barbara 

Elliott, James 
Ellison, William 
England, Timothy 
Enlow, Michelle 
Enochs, Steven 
Eriksen, Tonya 
Everman, Retha 
Fair, Tina 

Fanning, Margaret 
Federspill, Lisa 
Fee, David 
Fields, Kevin 
Finch, Monica 
Fmegold, Cari 
Fischer, Anna 
Fish, Catherine 

Fisher, Diane 
Fleser, Frank 
Flowers, Dick 
Flynn, James 
Foreman, Diana 
Fox, Todd 
Freije, Faith 
Fultz, Mark 




The "junior" coaches fight for both referee's and team's attention. JV assistant 
coach Anderson explains a floor plan while JV coach Baugh asks for an ex- 
planation. 



136/Juniors 



Basketball games are filled with tension and excitement. Twirlers and 
coaches "perform." 





Gardner, Joe 
Garrod, Brenda 
Gibson, Lori 
Glaze, Cheryl 
Goodrich, Karen 
Gordon, Courtney 
Gossett, Randy 
Gough, Brian 



Griffin, Sheila 
Gutierrez, Gloria 
Hall, Anthony 
Hall, Brian 
Hall, Ricky 
Hanson, Ronnie 
Harder, Christopher 
Harlan, Barry 

Harper, Keily 
Hinman, Cathy 
Holder, Liane 
Hopkins, Peter 
Howard, Carlos 
Hubbard, Bobby 
Hudson, David 
Hudson, Monica 

Hupp, Anthony 
Hurd, Derrick 
Hutchison, Sandi 
Hutzler, Michael 
Irwin, Cheryl 
Jackson, Felicia 
Jackson, Renee 
Jacob, Larry 



Juniors/137 



Jarosinski, Rita 
Jefferson, Sandra 
Johnson, Angela 
Johnson, Barbara 
Johnson, Diana 
Johnson, Donna 
Johnson, Joyce 
Johnson, Kim 



Johnson, Linda 
Johnson, Sharon 
Jones, Joanne 
Jones, Kym 
Jones, Thomas 
Jones, Timothy 
Jordan, Laura 
Judd, Michael 

Kampf, Jill 
Kampf, Judith 
Kane, Christopher 
Kemp, Rhonda 
Key, Yolanda 
Killebrew, Linda 
King Barbara 
King, David 

King, Kevin 
Kinser, Robert 
Klutey, Cynthia 
Kocher, Cindy 
Koehl, Andy 
Kuhn, Jeanmarie 
Lacy, Charles 
Lake, Curtis 

Lee, Malinda 




Marshall's cheerblock was active at all games. Cy- 
nthia Featheringill sponsored the group. 



138/Juniors 




Rock stars such as Rod Stewart at- 
tracted Pat fans to MSA. Reserved 
seating became a must after the 
Cincinnati Who Concert disaster. 




Leibrant, Tanya 
Leslie, Gina 
Lewis, Daniel 
Lillocotch, Karen 
Lopez, Clifford 
Love, Buddy 
Lowe, Debbie 
Lummis, John 



Lynch, George 
Malone, Anthony 
Mangine, Brenda 
Manson, Sabrina 
Mathews, Terrence 
Matthews, Carlita 
Matthews, Julie 
May, Dana 

Mayes, Rhonda 
Mays, Sebrina 
McCall, James 
McCarty, David 
McCord, Russell 
McCoy, Tonya 
McCurry, Michael 
McCarr, Bonnie 

McGillem, Melissa 
McGinley, Susan 
McMillan, Timothy 
Means, Donald 
Mendenhall, James 
Miller, Cheryl 
Miller, Linda 



Juniors/139 



Miller, Mary 
Miller, Melissa 
Mitchell, Chris 
Mittman, Julie 
Mobley, Patrick 
Moffitt, Jeffery 
Moon, Donald 
Moore, Lester 



Moore, Linda 
Moore, Terry 
Morgan, Edward 
Morris, Cheryl 
Morris, Timothy 
Moulder, Gail 
Murphy, Julie 
Muse, Valeeda 

Musgrave, Wendy 
Napper, Lisa 
Navarro, Norma 
Neal, Sheryl 
Nell, Grant 
Nelson, John 
Nevilles, Varinia 
Newman, Jacquelyn 

Nolin, Lorri 
Norwood, Yolanda 
Novotny, April 
Nugent, Timothy 
O'Connor, Rebecca 
Outlaw, Michael 
Paicely, Trent 
Parnam, Mary 

Parker, Margaret 
Parks, Kerry 
Patrick, Gregory 
Patterson, Torre 
Patton, George 
Pearson, Derrick 
Perkins, Priscilla 
Phelps, Edward 




Feast and Follies had a country theme last May 
at the Sherwood Country Club. 



140/Juniors 



Student parking was messed up when one of the the light was capped, 
security lights bit the asphalt. In only two weeks, 





Phillips, Charles 
Phillips, Timothy 
Pickens, Lucious 
Pittman, Kimberly 
Plummer, Debra 
Portwood, Diane 
Pounds, Mary 
Powell, Calandra 



Powell, Keith 
Price, Norman 
Price, Vincent 
Prunty, Jeffrey 
Purcell, Jajuana 
Ramer, Linda 
Ramsey, Tern 
Ranee, Anita 

Reed, Julie 
Reed, Tamara 
Reininger, Jane 
Rhodes, Gregory 
Richards, Scott 
Richards, Shellie 
Richardson, Tim 
Richmann, Sandra 

Ridge, Kimberly 
Riley, Cherri 
Riley, Lynne 
Robertson, Richard 
Rochford, Lynne 
Rogers, Edward 
Rose, Craig 
Rowley, Terri 

Royce, Christina 
Royce, Kevin 
Royce, Susan 
Ruble, Esther 
Rudicel, Sheila 
Russell, Edward 
Russell, Mark 
Russell, Patrick 



Juniors/141 



Sanders, Roselyn 
Sanders, Patrice 
Scott, Christine 
Scott, Michael 
Scott, Robert 
Scott, Steven 
Sexson, J.B. 
Shilling, Michael 



Shriver, Stephen 
Shuffitt, Claude 
Simmons, Eric 
Sinders, Ellen 
Slaughter, Tina 
Smith, Betty 
Smith, Bill 
Smith, Jill 

Smith, Randall 
Snow, Darlene 
Spencer, Pamela 
Springer, Randy 
Spurling, Kent 
Stav, Ricky 
Steele, Lee 
Stelmashenko, Lisa 

Stelmashenko, Vitali 
Stewart, Brian 
Stewart, Sheila 
Stiles, Diane 
Stoe, Marty 
Stone, Raymond 
Stringer, Penny 
Stuart, Letitia 

Sulzberger, Kurt 
Sutton, Joy 
Tate, Terri 
Taylor, JefTery 
Taylor, Kevin 
Teal, Rick 
Terrell, Tammie 
Terry, Jean 

Thompson, Celeste 
Thompson, Sheila 
Tilley, Sharon 
Tincher, Joni 
Todd, Yvonne 
Torrence, Leon 
Torres, Maria 
Tremain, Barbara 

Turner, Katriece 
Turner, Roscoe 
Tutrow, Gary 
Tynes, Troy L 
Van Duyn, Todd 
Volz, Loren 
Von Burg, Julie 
Wade, Freddie 

Wade, Isaac 
Walker, Denise 
Wall, Karon 




* * * * 




142/Juniors 




Wallace, Wendy 
Wampler, Carla 
Warner, Vincent 
Washington, Anita 
Washington, Antione 
Washington, Teresa 
Washington, Tony 
Weathington, Anthony 

Webster, Kym 
Weeks, Victoria 
Weisheit, Deborah 
West, Kimberly 
West, Krista 
Westerfield, Kathleen 
Westmoreland, Michahael 
Wheasler, Rebecca 

Wheeler, Dwight 
Whiles, Traci 
White, Christina 
Whitley, Daryl 
Whitley, Stanley 
Williams, David 
Williams, Natalie 
Williams, Pennae 

Williams, Phaedra 
Williams, Randall 
Williamson, Kenneth 
Wilson, Kim 
Wilson, Ronnie 
Winfield, James 
Winters, James 
Withers, Christopher 

Wolf, William 
Wood, Kenneth 
Woodword, Rosetta 
York, Victoria 
Young, Kerri 
Young, Mark 
Young, Robert 
Zaring, Tracie 



Juniors/143 



A 



Sophomores Settle in Well 



feeling of relief surrounded you as 
you entered the home of the Patriots for 
the first time that second year. You were 
no longer a freshman, nervous in new 
surroundings. You were a sophomore. 

Sophomore. Another word for it could 
be sophist. It means one who uses 
clever reasoning, not necessarily being 
correct. Sly could be a choice for its 
definition. 

Many sophomores jeered incoming 
freshmen continuing the tradition 
handed down from predecessors, but 
they soon got over it and welcomed the 
new arrivals as fellow inmates of ol' 
JMHS. 

Biology was and still is the dread of 
the sophomore student. Collecting 
leaves, sighting birds, field trips were a 
tedious chores. Fun was poked at the 



girl who regurgitated during the dis- 
section of the puppet pig, grasshopper 
. . . and the frog. Remember the times 
the boy who always slept in the back of 
the room was bombed with paper wads 
by yours truly. 

Looking back as we approached the 
final days of semester two, we came to 
the realization that the year wasn't all 
that bad. 

Many new acquaintances were made 
and good times were had. 

The year ended. Farewells, keep in 
touches, and see you next years were 
exchanged, not to mention phone num- 
bers. But you'll be back next year as a 
junior. 

Ah! But, that's a different story. 




144/Sophomores 




Abel, Ron 
Adams, Trent 
Aitken, Allen 
Alcorn, Michael 
Allen, Cheryl 
Alums, Tami 
Annarino, Susan 
Bailey, Tony 



Baird, Richard 
Baker, Darlene 
Baker, Rebecca 
Baker, Theresa 
Baker, Tina 
Ball, Rhonda 
Banks, Jacqueline 
Banks, Ladonna 

Banks, Leroy 
Barbee, Sandra 
Barnes, David 
Barron, Joseph 
Bauer, Gregg 
Baxter, William 
Beard, Mark 
Beasley, Kimberly 

Beaver, Cheryl 
Beaver, Kimberly 
Behrman, Robin 
Benjamin, Sylvia 
Bennett, Stephen 
Benson, Ronald 
Bentley, Angela 
Berry, Anna 

Bibbs, Rebecca 
Bills, Dawn 
Billups, Charlena 
Birdsong, Kelly 
Boggs, Tammy 
Bolding, Charlena 
Bowling, Edward 
Boyle, Stacia 

Bradford, Gina 
Bradshaw, Stanly 
Branch, Dwayne 
Brandon, Cina 
Brangan, Amy 
Branham, Shiloh 
Brasher, Kimberly 
Breeden, Cynthia 

Bright, Kimberly 
Brim, Brenda 
Brown, Jesse 
Brown, Lisa 
Brown, Yolanda 
Bryant, Bennie 
Bryant, David 
Burcham, Leisa 

Burchfield, Jim 
Burgess, Yolanda 
Burleson, Paula 
Burris, Bart 
Butler, Arby 
Butler Jr., Wilson 
Buttrum, Julie 
Cage, Gail 

Cannon, Yogi 
Canntar, Rick 
Carson, Sheila 
Chapman, Angela 
Cheatham, Deanna 
Chilcote, Thomas 
Childs, Duane 
Colbert, Christine 



Sophomores/145 



Cole, Kimberly 
Cole, Patrick 
Collins, Cheryl 
Conners, Lynn 
Cook, Kathy 
Corbin, Martin 
Corso, Denise 
Cortellini, Tina 



Cosby, Stacy 
Cottrell, Cynthia 
Cox, Scott 
Crawford, Zelle 
Creek, Dana 
Crittenden, Derrick 
Crouch, Michael 
Crowell, Kathryn 

Cumberlander, 

Kimberley 
Cutshaw, Joseph 
Davis, Andrew 
Davis, Brad 
Davis, Juanita 
Davis, Karen 
Deer, Kathy 
Degraphenreed, 

IMancita 
Disser, Laura 
Dobbs, Christopher 
Dodd, Belinda 
Dodds, Sharon 
Downs, Jacqueline 
Durham, Lisa 
Dye, Richard 
Edwards, Roberta 

Elliott, Kenneth 
Everman, Devonna 
Falconer, Leangela 
Fanning, David 
Fillenwarth, Linda 
Finch, Rochelle 
Fish, Elizabeth 
Flemings, Kendall 







After-hours typing practice makes perfect so 
these students say. 



146/Sophomores 



The baseball crowd cheered the sectional chanps 
Athletics and academics do go together as this on, but waiting for the game to start was B-O-R- 
physics picture proves. I-N-G! 





Flitman, Teri A. 
Foreman, Gerald 
Fry, Dennis 
Furlani, Rebecca 
Gadis, Vernice 
Garza, Eli 
Gasaway, Clint 
Gentry, Richard 



Gilbert, Ronald 
Goar, Stuart 
Goff, Mark 
Goliday, Evelyn 
Graham, Dana 
Graves, Robert 
Gregory, Sherry 
Gwaltney, Cathleen 

Hallam, Gary 
Hammomd, Velma 
Harder, Micheal 
Harrison, Arvetta 
Harrison, Bonnie 
Hays, Cathy 
Heck, Gayle 
Heffernan, Douglas 

Henry, Joyce 
Henry, Ricky 
Hewlett, Henry 
Hicks, Michelle 
Hinote, Tammy 
Hoeycutt, Matt 
Horn, Guy 
Houston, Floyd 



Sophomores/147 



Howard, Cina 
Hubbard, Tracie 
Hughes, Bonnietta 
Hughes, Lori 
Hughes, Stephanie 
Hunt, Monique 
Hupp, Theresa 
Hurd, Anthony 



Ingram, Bryant 
Irwin, Rita 
Jackson, Beverly 
Jeffries, Debra 
Johnson, Detra 
Johnson, Penny 
Jones, Marilyn 
Jones, Mary 

Jones, Venus 
Jones, Yolanda 
Kelle, Cheryl 
Keller, Vicki 
Kinchlow, Tammi 
King, Christina 
King, Ronald 
Kipp, Leslie 

Kirk, Evan 
Lacy, Howard 
Lambirth, Irene 
Laners, Johnny 
Lavderdale, Kevin 
Lee, Crystal 
Lepscum, Melinda 
Lessley, Monica 




The Choir float featured Bob Gray and John 
Adams as Patriot and Devil. 



148/Sophomores 



Where Have All The Guides Gone? 



w 



here do old magazines go when 
they become outdated? If you think they 
wind up in dentists' or doctors' offices, 
waiting rooms waiting for the tenth an- 
niversary of their release, you're wrong. 
In fact one Marshall student is serious 
about collecting magazines and has been 
collecting T.V. Guides for the past 10 
years. 

Scott Holden, a senior at Marshall 
began collecting the magazines after a 
friend who had been collecting comic 
books inspired him to begin a collection. 
Scott calls his collection "just a hobby" 
and at present has close to 600 of the 
weekly periodical which features infor- 
mation about television and a complete 
weekly listing of all the shows on the 
tube. Scott keeps his collection in a 
bookcase in his room. Although he 
claims he has no real reason to save, he 



admits that "some of the earliest edi- 
tions are worth close to $120." Scott 
really has no favorite but he does admit 
to being the proud possessor of the 
"March 26-April 1st" of 1960" edition 
with a Donna Reed photo on the cover 
which has a collector's value of $60. 
Scott wrote to New York to search for 
information about his magazines and 
was informed that only one other per- 
son in the USA has a collection even 
near the value of his. 

Scott plans to go on collecting the 
magazines and in the future intends to 
pass on the collection to his children. 
Scott admits with an air of anticipation 
in his voice, "Someday this will be 
worth a lot of money that's looking a lot 
ahead a bit isn't it?" 

by Mark Goff 




Lewis, Becky 
Lewis, Dana 
Lewis, Gerald 
Lindauer, Kathleen 
Little, Carmen 
Lonis, Timothy 
Luessow, Karen 
Lutocka, Debra 



Lyvers, Gayle 
Mabry, Sherri 
Madden, Lamargo 
Martin, Mike 
Mason, John 
Matthews, Michael 
McCarty, Katie 
McCoy, Mark 

McDonald, Debra 
McDowell, Stephanie 
McFarland, Christina 
McGill, Larry 
McNeal, Joy 
Means, Gary 
Mendenhall, Holly 
Merriweather, Veronica 

Mike, Valerie 
Miller, Stephen 
Milton, Leslie 
Mogollon, Carlos 
Montgomery, Charles 
Morgan, Jeffrey 
Morgan, Sharon 
Moore, Sheila 



Sophomores/149 



Morris, Craig 
Morrow, Charlotte 
Mosley, Michelle 
Murff, Jesse 
Murrell, Edward 
Murry, Angelene 
Muse, Lynet 
Mushatt, Craig 



Neal, Judith 
Neville, Maureen 
Newell, Pamela 
Novotny, Shari 
Nowosielski, John 
Obrien, Carrie 
Opel, Mark 
Orr, Freddie 

Osborne, Mark 
Parnell, Tony 
Payne, Veronica 
Pease, Sandra 
Perry, Bryan 
Pettway, Dorian 
Petty, Robert 
Phipps, Paul 

Pittman, Marilyn 
Poore, Tammara 
Porter, Stephanie 
Powell, Anna Marie 
Powell, Dennis 
Power, Lee 
Prather, Jon 
Price, Carolyn 

Proctor, Jacqueline 
Quinn, Deyrl Ray 
Ramsey, Doyle 
Ranger, Robert 
Reckert, Valeria 
Reynolds, Jennifer 
Richardson, Cary 
Riley, Jane 




Sophomores often elect typing to further their 
business skills. 



150/Sophomores 




Riley, Leon 
Rovers, Shirley 
Rizor, Sherry 
Robertson, James 
Rogers, Deborah 
Rogers, Lori 
Roseburgh, Felicia 
Royce, Patrick 



Royce, Sean 
Rudd, Stephen 
Sanders, Elvin 
Sanders, Roselyn 
Sawyers, David 
Schaffer, James 
Scheibelhut, Marie 
Schrock, Bernice 

Shanklin, Keith 
Sharp, Richard 
Shelton, Cassandra 
Shelton, Pennee 
Shorter, Danny 
Simmons, Phyllis 
Slaughter, Carmine 
Sluss, David 

Smith, Anita 
Smith, Darryl 
Smith, Marshal 
Smith, Terri 
Soots, Lorianne 
Sowell, Jennifer 
Spradlin, Jeffery 
Squires, Grant 

Stanback, Dianne 
Sterrett, John 
Stockoff, Brenda 
Stoe, Tom 
Stubbs, Beverly 
Stubbs, Terrance 
Stucker, Lucynda 
Tarter, Tracy 

Taylor, Angela 
Taylor, Shelbie 
Taylor, Tiese 
Terrell, Turisha 
Thompson, David 
Thompson, Yvette 
Tolle, Michelle 
Trabue, Stephanie 

Trahan, Stephen 
Traylor, Thomas 
Truitt, Roy 
Tuley, Thomas 
Walker, Alonzo 
Walker, Belinda 
Walters, Daniel 
Washington, Byron 

Westbrook, Parrish 
Wheeler, Carrey 
White, Kathryn 
Wilkerson, Angela 
Williams, Carol 
Williams, Keith 
Williams, Marcus 
Williams, Melissa 

Williams, Stacey 
Willis, Laurie 
Wilson, Dera 
Wilson, Ruth 
Wilson, Wayne 
Wood, Gregory 
Young, Chrystal 
Yowell, Janine 



Sophomores/151 



Freshmen— We Endured 



w 



e made it. Summer ended and 
as September approached, we began to 
realize that we had survived. The tor- 
turous "Freshman Year" wasn't really as 
bad as we thought. When we first came 
to high school, we looked at our first 
year as a monumental task we would 
never get through. But we made it! Now 
we look ahead. Oh, sure, being a sopho- 
more must be a breeze compared to be- 
ing a freshman. 

"FRESHMAN!", oh the terrible calls 
from the crowded lunchroom as we 
dropped our trays still ring a heavy echo 
in our minds, but we were wrong. Our 
first mistake was believing it would get 
easier because it didn't. Now two words 
screamed like threats on our lives as we 



scanned our schedules; BIOLOGY and 
ENGLISH III! Sure they're only words, 
but to us poor young students, fresh 
out of high school weening, they 
seemed like the biggest road blocks 
we'd ever face. But, wait, are we not 
Patriots? Can we not endure and sur- 
vive? After all at least we're getting 
somewhere. Not we know our way 
around the school and even our knees 
don't shake when we get a call slip. Re- 
lax, sophomores! You're in and you've 
only got two more years 'til you're a se- 
nior. And that in itself is an incentive 
isn't it? We'll make it and we'll come 
out on top because after all we're the 
Patriot class of '82 and we're going to 
show them what to do! 





Dr. James Gaither checks for corrider passes in 
the English hall. 



The frosh float captured attention and began the 
Calss of '83's participation in activities. 



152/Freshmen 



Several Freshman acted in "Peter Pan", the sum- 
mer musical. 





Aberett, Greg 
Abner, Margarette 
Adams, Dan 
Ablertson, Mary 
Alexander, Richard 
Alums, Tonya 
Anderson, Arthur 
Andrews, Karrie 



Asa, Rodney 
Atchley, Rodney 
Averill, Kimberly 
Avra, Perry 
Babb, Rodney 
Baker, Kim 
Baker, Terri 



Ballinger, Dana 
Barbee, Penny 
Barnard, Barbara 
Barnes, Angela 
Barnes, Edward 
Barnes, Terri 
Barnett, Julie 
Beamus, Sheila 

Benberry, Michael 
Benjamin, Monticello 
Black, Denise 
Blackmon, Brian 
Blakeslee, Brian 
Blow, Lisa 
Bode, Bonita 
Boggs, Carol 



Freshmen/ 153 



Bounin, Randall 
Boyd, Steven 
Bradley, Tracey 
Bramelh, Dan 
Brewer, Anita 
Brickens, Michael 
Brown, Erik 
Brown, Jacqueline 



Brown, Lynnetta 
Brunnworth, Dennis 
Bryant, Marrion 
Buggs, Darryl 
Bunch, Gina 
Burton, Ronald 
Bush, Angela 
Byrd, Kristal 

Byrd, Liliani 
Cage, David 
Cain, Cindy 
Cane, Lisa 
Cason, Lori 
Charleston, John 
Clark, Holland 
Cody, Vanessa 

Collins, Tina 
Collins, Patricia 
Conners, Deborah 
Cook, Lawerence 
Cox, Michelle 
Crabtree, Susie 
Crayton, Garlidene 
Cromwell, Steven 

Cronin, Daniel 
Croom, Bruce 
Crosby, Shawn 
Crutcher, Stacey 
Cruthird, Veda 
Cunningham, Cynthia 
Cutshaw, Jean 
Daugherty, Dana 

Davis, Angela L. 
Davis, Angela M. 
Davis, Dinetia 




154/Freshmen 



Marching in the Homecoming Parade is a high- 
light for all fall teams, including the Pat's Volley- 
ball team. 




Durham, Lanora 
Edwards, Theresa 
Elliott, Jodi 
Emmons, Wendi 
Evans, Adrian 
Everman, Randall 
Ezeil, Kari 
Faux, Lea 

Feathergill, Bryan 
Fee, Susan 
Fillanworth, Greg 
Finger, Kassandra 
Fischer, Darlene 
Fischer, Eddie 
Flynn, Elizabeth 
Forte, Beverly 

Foster, Jill 
Foster, Robert 
Fowler, Lamont 
Frost, Sheri 
Fry, Delve 
Garcia, Randy 
Gaston, Anthony 
Gaston, Gina 

Gentry, Nina 
Gibson, Jacqueline 
Gilbart, Lisa 
Griffin, Alan 
Grissom, Vernice 
Gruner, Daniel 
Hall, Rhonda 
Hamler, Toni 



Freshmen/ 155 



Hammons, Michael 
Hann, Scott 
Harlan, Glen 
Harlan, Gregory 
Harlan, Sherry 
Harper, Tonya 
Harrington, Tyla 
Harris, Draine 



Harris, Kim 
Harvey, Tursha 
Hassos, Thomas 
Hawkins, Sharmon 
Hawkins, Valerie 
Heck, Angela 
Hewlett, Shawn 
Hewlett, Sheena 

Hidelburg, John 
Hill, Jeffery 
Hill, Sam 
Hill, Sheila 
Hill, Wade 
Hobbs, Melissa 
Holifield, William 
Houck, Kenneth 

Howard, LeWanna 
Howcott, John 
Hubbard, Terri 
Hunt, Danny 
Irvin, Debbie 
Isaacs, Debbie 
Ivy, Robert 
Jackson, Vanessa 

Jackson, Clarence 
Jacobs, Joe 
Jaronsinski, Joseph 
Jelk, DeWayne 
Jennings, Angela 
Jennings, Lisa 
Johnson, Kenneth 
Johnson, Penny 

Johnson, Tonia 
Jones, David 




Chemistry is another elective fresh should con 
sider; especially if college seems possible. 



156/Freshmen 




H 




ave you ever been in a dark alley, 
with a huge dude about to send you to 
a three to four-day stay in a hospital and 
you only wished you knew how to defend 
yourself? Well, one Marshall student, 
Mark Moore, a senior, has been taking 
Tai-kwon-doe lessons for the past five 
years. He's a second degree black belt. 

It doesn't take a college degree to 
figure out you'd have to be crazy to go 
up against that kind of experience. 
Mark said he began taking lessons after 
a friend of his, Larry Mullins took him 
along to watch one day. Soon after- 
wards Mark, who takes his lessons at 
TKA Karate on Pendleton Pike, says the 
difference between Tai Kwon doe and 
the other marshall arts is that Tai- 
Kwon-doe is 70% kicking and does not 
use hands or fists as much. 

Mark says he takes the lessons both 
for recreation as well as to learn to de- 
fend himself. Mark plans to go on tak- 
ing Tai-won-doe because it is very inter- 
esting and is a great form of exercise. 
So, goons watch out, Mark Moore isn't 
your average prey; in fact, you might 
end up the victim. 

By Mark Goff 
Photo/ Becky Baker 



Jones, Jerry 
Jones, Jill 
Jones, Sean 
Julian, Ralph 
Kage, Karmen 
Kelle, Kevin 
Kelly, Michael 
Killebrew, David 



King, Brian 
Kinser, Joni 
Kesic, Kristina 
Knight, Kelly 
Koors, Diane 
Kress, Rene 
Lacy, Steven 
Lambrith, Lance 

Langford, Shana 
Leach, Anthony 
Lester, Lisa 
Little, Judith 
Loy, Julie 
Lummis, Lisa 
Lynch, Jewel 
Marsden, Robert 



Marsh, Paula 
Martin, Michael 
Matthews, Renee 
Matthews, Jennifer 
May, Linda 
McCall, Russell 
McGillem, Daivd 
McKnight, Cheryl 



Freshmen/157 



Seniors Van Duyn and Hall experiment in physics. 
This is an elective freshmen should consider their 
senior year. 



McPherson, Katherine 
McVea, Tamera 
McWilliams, Steven 
Means, Vonda 
Merriweather, Clayton 
Meyers, Clandall 
Micheels, Denise 
Miller, Betty 



Miller, Debbie 

Her, Rhonda 

Her, Roger 

Her, Sherri 

Her, Sue 
Moffitt, James 
Montgomery, Dwayne 
Moore, Stanley 

Moore, Yvonne 
Morris, Michael 
Murphy, Lisa 
Murral, Kim 
Navarro, George 
Nell, Ryan 
Nevilles, Mark 
Newell, Debra 

Newson, Cheryl 
Nickell, Michelle 
Nolin, Crystal 
O'Neal, Michael 
Palmer, Jennifer 
Paslay, Bryan 
Peercy, Deborah 
Perry, Kevin 




158/Freshmen 




Pettijohn, Brenda 
Petty, Robert 
Phillips, Jeanne 
Pickings, Carl 
Pipas, Charlie 
Pinner, Curtis 
Presnell, Jeff 
Price, Judd 



Prunty, Laura 
Quiles, Lorrie 
Reed, Gerald 
Rice, Donnetta 
Ricketts, Michael 
Robinson, Cynthia 
Robinson, Emaryne 
Rodman, Scott 

Rosenstihl, William 
Rowan, Timothy 
Rudicel, Anthony 
Sandefur, Melissa 
Sansone, Rita 
Sayles, Cinnita 
Shoemake, Lisa 
Shrum, Vancessa 

Sieving, Jennifer 
Smith, Debbie 
Smith, Robert 
Smith, Roy 
Snipes, Tonette 
Snodgrass, Dana 
Spight, Derrick 
Starks, Alice 

Staten, Mark 
Stave, Randy 
Steek, Wendell 
Stelmashenko, Yurri 
Stiles, Kimberley 
Stone, Terty 
Stone, Daniel 
Stratton, Joseph 

Street, Steven 
Strickling, Kenneth 
Strickling, Sandra 
Stringer, Clara 
Strode, Theresa 
Stubb, Volanda 
Szmoho, Wendy 
Tanner, Rebecca 

Taylor, Kelley 
Taylor, Patrick 
Taylor, Tarsha 
Terrell, Efrem 
Terry, Karen 
Thompson, Bryan 
Thompson, Floyd 
Tincher, Julie 

Tinker, Byron 
Tubbs, Micheal 
Turner, Janet 
Uhlanhake, Robwerty 
Utley, Michelle 
Vaugghn, James 
Vincent, Mark 
Wadlington, Crystal 



Freshmen/159 



Waller, Cindy 
Watkins, Lillie 
Watts, Kevin 
Welch, Vernetta 
Winship, Donna 
West, Brian 
White, Eric 
White, Julie 



White, Kari 
Whitley, Rhonda 
Williams, Diahn 
Williams, Tonmya 
Wilson, Jeffrey 
Wilson, Jeffrey 
Wray, Julie 
Yates, Steven 

Young, Kelly 
Young, Regine 
Younger, Robert 
Zamora, Angela 




Catcher Eddie Parrott watches his team while 
waiting his turn to bat. "Mr. Hustle" is Eddie's 
name. 

Downtown was the center for 500 parades and 
teacher strikes. But, in spring, it's a beautiful 
sight for all. 



160/ Freshmen 



Draft Registration Raises Teen 
Temperatures 



p 

| resident Carter proposed on Feb- 
ruary 8, 1980 that draft registration be 
opened to both men and women be- 
tween the ages of 19 and 20. The pro- 
posal raised controversy across the 
country. 

Many girls at Marshall have stated 
that they oppose draft registration for 
women. Some of the reasons for oppo- 
sition are that "women aren't prepared 
for war and wouldn't be able to adapt 



to war." 

Several of the country's women's 
groups support Carter's proposition. 
Carter's largest opposition comes from 
the Congress which believes that women 
soldiers would be detrimental to the 
security of the country during a war. 

Since the proposal, the Canadian Em- 
bassy has reported an increase in calls 
from both male and female Americans 
wanting to find out how to emigrate to 



Canada. Many government officials have 
stated that they do not believe Ameri- 
cans will exercise draft evasion as in the 
Vietnamese War of the late 1960's. 

Carter believes that draft registration 
is necessary at this time. He also real- 
ized "that both men and women are 
working members of our society." 

by Carole A. Terry 




'Must' Material *"• 
Covered 



After a rocky beginning, the Marshall faculty pushed aca- 
demics into a speed-up schedule so students wouldn't be hurt 
by the month-long delay of getting school settled. Most 
teachers gave incompletes for the first grading period. The 
"must" material was covered in most classes. It was the en- 
richment and class time for homework which was shortened 
or eliminated. 

One major problem attacked in the second semester was 
tardiness. Thanks, to the 208-209 system and study hall 
teachers, students soon learned to get to class on time. Brice 
Tressler, David Clapp and David Roberts attended to the 
project's paper work. 

Teacher surplusing took its toll when Deborah Smith, Tom 
Van Lieu and Lynn Palenik were "trimmed" from the staff 
because enrollment had dropped. Palenik joined Sigrid Vau- 
bel at Marshall in the federally-funded reading program while 
Van Lieu and Smith were sent to junior highs. 

Contract dispute, flu, 13% inflation, Iran's hostages, Rus- 
sians on the move, the piano lab, first place city math scores, 
reading improvement, increased student attendance, the ad- 
dition of the federally-funded Guidance Learning Center and 
getting grants for three more computer systems and in- 
creased faculty participation in North Central evaluation of 
other schools were all part of the year. 




Golf Coach Dave Smartz helps Kent Von Burg clean up his equipment before 
the match begins. 




Principal 

Thomas M. Haynes 



Vice Principal 
Fred Jones 



Vice Principal 
James Rodeheffer 




Evening School Director 
Clifford Snyder 



Athletic Director 
Don Glesing 



162/ Faculty 



Department Heads 




Raymond Brandes 
Music 



Robert Carr 
Math 



Norma Dillon 
Science 



Dr. James Gaither 
English 




Marilyn Johannessen 
Home Economics 



Virginia McDonald 
IMC 



Ruth Nelson 
Foreign Language 



Theodore Pollock 
Physical Education 




Edward Ring 
Art 



Dwight Shaw 
Social Studies 



Barbara Uhrig 
Special Ed 



Janet Weaver 
Business 



Faculty/163 



Counseling for Academics, Health 




Donald Austin 
Freshman Counselor 



Marjorie Christy 
Junior Counselor 



Bessie Conn 
GLC Counselor 



Gloria Dozier 
Assistant Dean of Girls 




Marilyn Hardwick 
Dean of Girls 



Martha Francis 
Nurse 



Aileen Lackey 
Social Services 



George McCool 
Assistant Dean of Boys 




Benjamin Sanders 
Sophomore Counselor 



Roger Schroder 
Senior Counselor 



Rebecca Starke 
Social Services 



John Vardaman 
Director of Guidance 



164/ Faculty 




John Allen 

Social Studies 
Charlene Anderson 

Business 
Bill Baugh 

Social Studies 
Lester Bivens 

Social Studies 



Patrick Bonfils 

Science 
Edward Bopp 

Social Studies 
Linda Breyer 

English 
Eric Broadus 

Science 



Leonard Brown 

Physical Education 
■Robert Brown 

English 
Neil Brumbaugh 

Science 
Dan Bullington 

Social Studies 



Larry Burdick 

English 
Rosemary Carpenter 

English 
Martin Coble 

Industrial Arts 
Martin Coogan 

Science 



Robert Craig 

Science 
John Deal 

Social Studies 
John Eason 

Social Studies 
Janet Eberle 

Publications 



Faculty/ 165 



V.M. Ellur 

Math 
Virginia Esten 

Science 
Emmit Faulkenberg 

Industrial Arts 
Cynthia Featheringill 

Music 



Max Forsyth 

Science 
Kenneth George 

Business 
Pearla Gholston 

English 
Brad Goffmet 

Health 



Martha Griffin 

Physical Education 
James Harvey 

Social Studies 
Paul Hayes 

Industrial Arts 
Becky Hertz 

IMC 



Lowell Hester 

Industrial Arts 
Janice Hofts 

Foreign Language 
Jerry Hurst 

English 
Linda James 

English 



Daniel Johnson 

Industrial Arts 
David Johnson 

Business 
Paul L. Justice 

Industrial Arts 
Randy Lamb 

Science 




166/ Faculty 




Sandra Lucas 

Business 
Marie McKeller 

Home Economics 
Robert Meurer 

Music 
Wendell Mozingo 

Special Education 



Marvolene Nicholson 

Foreign Language 
Alan Norris 

Math 
David Otto 

Science 
Rochelle Owsley 

English 



Susan Packwood 

Home Economics 
William Pennington 

ROTC 
Nicholas Pipino 

Science 
Steve Porter 

Special Education 



Jean Potts 

Business 
Gwendolyn Reed 

Math 
David Roberts 

Math 
Barbara Robertson 

Business 



David Russell 

Business 
Patricia Sahm 

Business 
Joyce Sausser 

Social Studies 
Roderick Shaw 

Art 



1 ■ K ».V> 



Faculty/ 167 



Greg Shelton 

English 
B.J. Simon 

Home Economics 
David Smartz 

Business 
Deborah Smith 

Social Studies 



Brice Tressler 

Foreign Language 
Donald Tuttle 

Math 
Tony Utley 

Art 
Thomas Van Lieu 

Industrial Arts 



John Veza 

Physical Education 
Jack Weaver 

English 

Nancy Williams 

English 
Gary Wyne 

Math 



Not pictured are: Pierce 
Cody, Dean of Boys; 
Brenda Kretz and Brenda 
Bartlett, Speech and 
Hearing; Bessie Garret, 
IPS Psychologist; Jacque- 
line Tompkins and Carolyn 
Payton, Career Education; 
James Keyes, Ombuds- 
man; Robert Chisley, In- 
dustrial Arts Head; Judy 
Fee and Fran Jacobs, IMC 
Assistants; Jack Davies, 
English; Gayla Evans and 
Gail Pollard, Special Edu- 
cation; Frank Thompson, 
Math; Etta Moran, Busi- 
ness; Jane Meranda, For- 
eign Language; Nicholas 
Logsdon, Art; Barbara 
Guhl, Physical Education; 
Bruce Blauvelt, ROTC; 
Melinda Webster, ESL. 




(Inset picture— Lynn Palenik) Mrs. Palenik and Sigrid Vaubel di- 
rect the tutorial reading program which is federally funded. All 
high schools have at least one teacher involved in the program. 



168/ Faculty 



Alberta Brown 


Kenya Brooks 


Lucile Byerly 


Ruth Carder 


Bernadette Collier 


JoAnn Dyke 


Patsy Hofer 


Bookstore Mgr. 


Music Assistant 


Switchboard 


Attendance 


Guidance Clerk 


Evening School 
Secretary 


Registrar 




Theresa Lake 
Attendance 



Carolyn Luessow 
Financial Clerk 



Marilyn Powell 
Budget Clerk, PBX 



Lisa Smith 
Secretary 



Sandra Wiseman 
Guidance Assistant 



Kathy Wooden 
Para-Professional 




Part of interested teacher's activi- 
ties is the encouragement and spon- 
sorship of after-school activities. 
Nick Pipino founded the IPS High 
School Bowling League and also en- 
courages the Marshall Bowling Club. 
Robert Carr encourages the Com- 
puter Club and aids individual stu- 
dents in the computer lab. Dave 
Roberts is sponsor of the computer 
club. 



Faculty/ 169 



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5000 Wo 25th Street 
Speedway, Indiana 46224 



For the Class of '80 

A NEW BEGINNING 

Your graduation from high school marks a new 
beginning for each of you. 

Your high school diploma shows you have met the 

challenge of the past four years. And we think 

that challenge shows the true spirit of the Class of 79. 

We are confident you will meet the challenges of 
your new beginning with the same spirit of determination. 

Congratulations one and all. We wish you the very best. 



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172/Advertising 



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Advertising/ 173 




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174/Advertising 



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PERSONAL 



MORTGAGE 



Advertising/177 



Abel, Ronald 145 

Abner, Margarette 153 

Abney, Lisa 115 

Ackerman, James P 115 

Ac'cerman, Shelley A 135 

Ac'.on, Michael J 115 

Adams, Dan M 153 

Adams, Dana L 115 

Adams, John J 115 

Adams, Trent L 145 

ADVERTISING 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 

175, 176, 177 
Agee, Christopher W 135 
Ahrens, Larry 115 
Aitken, Allen J 145 
Aitken, Pamela E 1X5 
Albertson, Mary 153 
Alcorn, Michael 145 
Alderson, Kevin J 115 
Alexander, Richard 154 
Allen, Alice F 115 
Allen, Anthony J 33, 135 
Allen, Cheryl 145 
Allen, John 14, 20, 165 
Alums, Craig S 115 
Alums, Tammi D 145 
Alums, Tonya 153 
Anderson, Anthony W 74, 115 
Anderson, Arthur 153 
Anderson, Charlene 165 
Anderson, Dave 135 
Anderson, Stacy A 135 
Annarino, Susan M 145 
Armour, Ronnie 135 
Armour, Theresa A 115 
Armour, Vonda 153 
Armstrong, Rhonda J 135 
Arnold, Deborah S 115 
Arnold, Jeffrey 115 
Arnold, Lori A 135 
Arnold, Michael E 115 
Arrington, Linda C 135 
ART 74, 75 
Asa, Rodney E 153 
Askren, Deborah L 135 
Atchley, Rodney 153 
Austin, Donald 164 
Averill, Kimberly 153 
Avra, Paula G 135 
Avra, Perry 153 

B 
Babb, Rodney 153 
Bailey, Tony L 145 
Baird, Richard A 145 
Baker, Darlene 145 
Baker, Dewayne 115 
Baker, Michael W 135 
Baker, Rebecca A 71, 145 
Baker, Tern 153 
Baker, Theresa A 145 
Baker, Tina L 145 
Bales, Susan M 135 
Ball, Dorria L 112, 115 
Ball, Rhonda D 145 
BANDS 86 

Banks, Jacqueline B 145 
Banks, Ladonna S 145 
Banks, Leroy 145 
Barbee, Penny 153 
Barbee, Sandra R 145 
Barclay, Barney L 135 
Barkdull, Mitchell A 115 
Barnard, Barbara E 153 



Barnes, Angela 153 
Barnes, David W 145 
Barnes, Edward 153 
Barnes, Steven L 135 
Barnes, Terri L 153 
Barnett, Brian 115 
Barnett, Julie 153 
Barnett, Monica S 115 
Barron, Joseph W 145 
Bartholomew, David A 115 
Bartholomew, Paul 115 
Basketball 28, 29, 30, 31 
Bauer, Gregg 145 
Baugh, William 165 
Baxter, William D 145 
Beamus, Sheila 153 
Beard, Mark W 145 
Beasley, Kimberly M 145 
Beaver, Cheryl L 145 
Beaver, Kimberly A 145 
Beck, Kelley L 116 
Beechler, Bruce R 135 
Beechler, David M 116 
Bell, Daniel 135 
Bell, Victor 116 
Bellinger, Michael 135 
Benberry, Charles D 135 
Benberry, Michael 153 
Benjamin, Monticello 153 
Benjamin, Sylvia R 145 
Bennett, Stephen L 145 
Bennett, Walter D 116 
Benson, Ronald E 145 
Bentley, Angela R 145 
Berry, Anna M 145 
Berry, Christopher U 116 
Berry, James A 116 
Berry, Randall T 116 
Berry, Tamara L 135 
Bibbs, Rebecca 145 
Biddy, Jonathan L 116 
Bills, Dawn L 145 
Billups, Charlena P 145 
Birdsong, Kelly R 145 
Bivens, Lester 165 
Black, Denise 153 
Black, Richard A 135 
Black, William A 116 
Blackmon, Brian 153 
Blackrnon, Dwayne 116 
Blakeslee, Brian 153 
Blarney, Billy 116 
Blauvelt, Bruce 169 
Blow, Lisa 153 
Bode, Bonita 153 
Boggs, Carol 153 
Bolding, Charlena G 145 
Bonebrake, Brenda S 116 
BonhTs, Patrick 165 
Boone, Carla M 135 
Bopp, Edward 165 
Bounin, Randall 153 
Bowen, Cecil R 116 
Bowers, Glenna 116 
BOWLING 45 
Bowling, Angela M 116 
Bowling, Edward D 145 
Bowling, Ellen J 116 
Boyd, David 153 
Boyle, Stacia A 145 
BUSINESS 80, 81 
Bradford, Gina Y 145 
Bradford, Keith 116 
Bradford, Wayne A 116 



Bradley, Tracey 153 
Bradshaw, Barbara A 116 
Bradshaw, Stanley E 145 
Brady, Angela L 135 
Brady, Kent D 135 
Bramell, Daniel 153 
Branch, Dwayne A 145 
Brandes, Raymond 163 
Brandon, Cina S 145 
Brangan, Amy L 145 
Brangan, David W 116 
Branham, Shiloh 145 
Brasher, Cheryl L 135 
Brasher, Kimberly A 145 
Breeden, Cynthia M 145 
Brewer, Anita 68, 154 
Brewster, Beverly A 116 
Breyer, Linda 165 
Brezausek, Judi A 135 
Brickens, Mark J 135 
Briggs, Jacqueline 116 
Briggs, Nancy J 116 
Bright, Cynthia 116 
Bright, Kimberly A 145 
Brim, Brenda 145 
Brmkley, Jim D 116 
Britton, Mary M 116 
Broadus, Eric 165 
Bronstrup, Robert G 116 
Brooks, David L 33, 117 
Brooks, Doyle L 33, 117 
Brooks, Linda S 117 
Brooks, Kenya 169 
Brown, Amy I 117 
Brown, Charlotte L 117 
Brown, Cherry L 135 
Brown, Erik 153 
Brown, Jacqueline 153 
Brown, Janetta L 117 
Brown, Jeffrey A 33 
Brown, Jesse C 145 
Brown, Judy 117 
Brown, Julie E 117 
Brown, Leonard 165 
Brown, Lisa R 117, 145 
Brown, Lynnetta 153 
Brown, Rick 33 
Brown, Robert 165 
Bruce Jr. Raymond A 135 
Brumbaugh, Neil 165 
Brunnworth, Dennis 154 
Bryant, Bennie L 145 
Bryant, Beverly R 34 
Bryant, David M 145 
Bryant, Marion E 154 
Buggs, Darryl 154 
Bullington, Dan 165 
Bumpas, Dianne S 135 
Bumpas, Ronald L 117 
Bunch, Gina 154 
Bunker, Mark L 117 
Burcham, Leisa M 145 
Burchfield, Jimmey S 145 
Burdick, Larry 165 
Burgess, Yolanda 145 
Burk, Patricia A 117 
Burkes, Charles 117 
Burleson, Paula L 145 
Burrell, Michelle L 135 
Burris, Bart S 145 
Burton, Ronald 154 
Bush, Angela 154 
Bustreo, Paolo G 117 
Butler, Arby W 145 



Butler, Darleen 117 
Butler, Lionel 117 
Butler Jr, Wilson 145 
Buttrum, Julie 145 
Byerly, Kathy 135 
Byers, Mary A 135 
Byrd, Kristal A 154 
Byrd, Liliani 154 

C 
Cage, David 154 
Cage, Gail 145 
Cain, Cindy 154 
Cain, James P 135 
Caine, Lisa G 154 
Calhoun, Benita 117 
Campbell, Judy L 104, 117 
Campbell, Yu Mi 117 
Cannon, Jerod J 117 
Cannon, Johanneson B 33, 145 
Cannon, Leisha F 117 
Canter, Richard K 145 
Cardwell, Monica A 117 
Carey, Darrell 117 
Carpenter, Rosemary 165 
Carr, Robert 163 
CARS 100, 101 
Carson, Sheila 145 
Carter, David L 117 
Carter, Erroll 118 
Carter, Monique R 34, 35 
Casky, Brent D 118 
Casky, Monique L 118 
Cason, Lori E 154 
Castor, Jayne A 135 
Chalupa, Donna A 78, 135 
Chapman, Angela M 145 
Chapman, Jennifer S 110 
Charleston, John 154 
Charpie, Jon B 135 
Cheatham, Deanna G 145 
Cheatham, Sharon L 135 
CHEERLEADERS 88, 89 
Chilcote, Cynthia L 118 
Chilcote, Thomas E 145 
Chilton, Sherree 118 
Chisley, Robert 169 
CHORAL GROUPS 90, 91 
Christian, Donna R 135 
Christy, Majorie 164 
Cicenas, Joseph 118 
Clapp, David 165 
Clardy, Steven W 118 
Clark, Beverly C 118, 135 
Clark, Holland 154 
Clark, Wayne 118 
Clements, Angela S 135 
demons, Clarence M 135 
demons, Clarice L 135 
Cleveland, Rhonda 135 
Cline, Deborah A 118 
Coble, Martin 165 
Cody, Brenda F 34, 135 
Cody, Pierce 122 
Cody, Vanessa 154 
Colbert, Christine R 145 
Colbert, Robin L 118 
Cole, Kimberly 145 
Cole, Patrick E 145 
Collins, Cheryl 145 
Collins, Patricia 154 
Collins, Tina 154 
Collins, Tracy A 135 
CONCERT 103 
Conn. Bessie 164 



Conners, Deborah 154 
Conners, Kenneth A 135 
Conners, Lynn C 145 
Coogan, Martin 165 
Cook, Kathy L 145 
Cook, Lawrence 154 
Coons, James A 135 
Corbin, Martin A 145 
Corso, Denise A 145 
Cortellini, Tina D 145 
Cosby, Preston M 118 
Cosby, Stacy L 146 
Cottrell, Cynthia G 146 
Couch, Norman L 118 
Coulter, Melanie A 118 
Cox, Michelle 154 
Cox, Scott P 146 
Crabtree, Barbara 154 
Craig, Allison M 135 
Craig, Robert 165 
Crain, James A 135 
Crawford, Zelle C 146 
Crayton, Garlidene 154 
Crayton, Terri E 135 
Creek, Dana J 146 
Creek, Kerry L 118 
Crittenden, Derrick 146 
Crittenden Jr, Henry 118 
Cromwell, Dawayne 135 
Cromwell, Steven 154 
Cronin, Catherine M 118 
Cronin, Daniel 154 
Cronin, Margaret A 135 
Croom, Bruce 154 
Crosby, Shawn 154 
CROSS COUNTRY 40 
Crouch, Joyce A 135 
Crouch, Michael C 146 
Crowell, Kathryn M 146 
Crutcher, Stacy 154 
Cruthird, Veda 154 
Cruthird, Veronica M 135 
Cumberlander, Kimberley E 146 
Cummings, Eugene J 33 
Cunningham, Amy S 48, 118 
Cunningham, Cynthia 154 
Curry, Tyrone E 135 
Cutshaw, Jean 118, 154 
Cutshaw, John T 118 
Cutshaw, Joseph E 146 

D 
Danaher, Anthony L 118 
Dangerfield, John 118 
Daniel, Willie L 135 
Daugherty, Dana 154 
Daugherty, Jodonna L 135 
Daugherty, Tim 118 
Davids, Robert M 10, 26, 118 
Davies, Jack 169 
Davis, Andrew W 146 
Davis, Angela L 154 
Davis, Betty J 135 
Davis, Daryl D 118 
Davis, Deetra 155 
Davis, Donald L 118 
Davis, Frankcene J 33, 135 
Davis, Jay R 119 
Davis, Juanita 146 
Davis, Sylvia M 119 
Davis, Terry L 119 
Davis, Tonya R 119 
Davison, Russel L 119 
Day, Leah M 135 
Deal, John 165 



178/Index 



Deaiduff, Rick L 119 
Deaver, George 119 
Deer, Kathy L 146 
Deer, Kerry L 135 
Deer, Kristy S 30, 119 
Degner, Shirley 154 
Degraphenreed, Nancita 146 
Demoss, Antonio L 135 
Denney, Bradley S 135 
Denney, Gregory M 135 
Dennis, Orlando 135 
Devore, Mary M 119 
Dibbern, Julie D 136 
Diehl, Cynthia L 38, 57 
Dillon, Norma 163 
Dillon, Teresa A 136 
Dishner, Aaron L 136 
Disser, L Renee 119 
Disser, Laura L 146 
Dobbs, Christopher D 146 
Dobbs Jr, Billy R 119 
Dodd, Charmane 158 
Dodd, Cynthia D 119 
Dodds, Sharon L 146 
Doles, Denise E 119 
Donahue, Darby K 136 
Donahue, Paul 86, 155 
Dorsey, James 136 
Douglass, Starla R 119 
Dowdell, Cathy E 119 
Downs, Jacqueline 146 
Dozier, Gloria 122, 163 
Drake, Cynthia L 119 
DRAMA 78, 79 
Duerson, Ruth A 136 
Duff, Robyn A 119 
Dungey III, Milton 155 
Dunham, Lisa L 146 
Durham, Lanora 155 
Dye, Barbara R 136 
Dye, Richard L 146 

E 
Eason, John 165 
Eberle, Janet 165 
Edison, Ganeene 119 
Edmondson, Efrem D 119 
Edwards, Kimberly A 119 
Edwards, Roberta 146 
Edwards, Theresa 155 
Elliott, James M 136 
Elliott, Jodi 155 
Elliott, Kenneth W 146 
Ellison, Judith A 120 
Ellison, William B 136 
Ellur, V.M. 166 
Emmons, Wendi 155 
England, Larry L 120 
England, Timothy P 136 
ENGLISH 56, 57 
Enlow, Michelle A 136 
Enochs, Steven 136 
Erickson, Priscilla A 18, 78, 120 
Ervin, Brian D 120 
Ervin, Carole A 120 
Esten, Virginia 166 
Evans, Adrian 155 
Evans, David W 120 
Evans, Gayla 166 
Evans, Linda M 120 
Everman, Devonna L 146 
Everman, Randall 155 
Everman, Retha D 136 
Ezell, Kan 155 

F 



Fair. Robbin S 122 
Fair, Tina M 136 
Falconer, Leangela A 146 
Fanning, David P 146 
Fanning, Margaret M 136 
Farmer, John 120 
Faulkenberg, Emmit 166 
Faux, Lea 155 
Featheringill, Bryan 6 
Featheringill, Cynthia 166 
Federspill, Lisa D 136 
Fee, David M 136 
Fee, Susan 155 
Fenter, Eric L 87, 120 
Ferree, Michael L 120 
Fields, James I 33 
Fields, Kevin L 55, 136 
Fillenwarth, Greg 155 
Fillenwarth, Linda M 146 
Finch, Monica A 136 
Finch, Rochelle D 146 
Finegold, Cari H 136 
Finger, Kassandra 155 
Fischer, Anna M 136 
Fischer, Darlene 155 
Fischer, Sherry L 120 
Fish, Catherine L 136 
Fish, Elizabeth A 146 
Fisher, Diane L 41, 136 
Fisher, Lynnette A 104, 120 
Flemings, Kendall L 33, 146 
Fleser, Frank F 136 
Flitman, Teri A 146 
Fluharty, Joan E 120 
Flynn, Elizabeth 155 
FOOTBALL 22, 23 
Forbis, Dawn J 120 
Ford, Kelly J 120 
FOREIGN LANGUAGE 54, 55 
Foreman, Gerald 146 
Forsyth, Max 166 
Forte, Beverly 155 
Foster, Jeri 120 
Foster, Robert J 155 
Fowler, Lamont 155 
Fox, Todd W 136 
Francis, Martha 162 
Franklin, Vickie M 120 
Freije, Faith A 136 
Frost, Sheri 155 
Fry, Delve 155 
Fry, Dennis D 146 
Furlani, Rebecca L 146 

G 
Gadis, Vernice 146 
Gaines. Edna 120 
Gainey, Wesley R 120 
Gaither, James 163 
Gant, Aleatrice 120 
Garcia, Randy 155 
Garrett, Jeffrey J 121 
Garrod, Brenda C 136 
Garza, Eli A 146 
Gasaway, Russell C 146 
Gaston, Anthony 155 
Gaston, Gina 155 
Gentry, Nicola J 121 
Gentry, Nina 43, 155 
Gentry, Richard L 146 
George, Kenneth 166 
Gerber, John E 121 
Gholston, Lisa L 121 
Gholston, Pearla 166 
Gibson, Jacqueline 155 



Gibson, Lori L 136 
Gilbert. Ronald 146 
Gill. Lisa 121 
Gillard, Willie L 121 
Gilliam, Gregory J 121 
Ginger, Karen L 121 
Glaze, Cheryl Y 136 
Gleasing, Don 162 
Glotfelty, Brian K 40, 121 
Goar, Stuart K 147 
Goff, Mark J 147 
Gomnet, Brad 166 
Gold, Terri L 121 
Goldman, Jerry L 121 
GOLF 41 

Goliday, Evelyn M 147 
Gorden, Eretha 121 
Goree, Michael A 121 
Gossett, Randy 136 
Gough, Brian E 136 
Graat, Jean A 121 
Graham, Dana Y 147 
Graham, Joyce A 121 
Grant, Chester E 121 
Graves Jr, Robert J 147 
Gray, Robert M 121 
Greenwald, Lisa K 8, 121 
Gregory, Sherry E 147 
Griffin, Alan B 155 
Griffen, Martha 166 
Griffin, Sheila V 136 
Grissom, Vernice 155 
Gruner, Daniel 155 
Gruner, Paul A 121 
Guhl, Barbara 169 
Gutierrez, Gloria M 136 
Gutierrez, Linda M 121 
Gwaltney, Cathleen F 147 
Gwaltney, Norman M 121 
GYMNASTICS 44 

H 
Hall, Anthony D 136 
Hall, Brian D 136 
Hall, Kimberly C 122 
Hall, Rhonda 155 
Hall, Ricky D 136 
Hall, Veon 33, 122 
Hallam, Gary R 147 t 
Hallam, Kerry L 8, 12, 122 
Hamler, Ton! 155 
Hammond, Paul 122 
Hammond, Velma F 147 
Hammons, Michael 155 
Hann, Scott 155 
Hanson, Veronica K 137 
Harder, Christopher N 137 
Harder, Michael J 147 
Hardwick, Marilyn 122, 162 
Harlan, Glen 155 
Harlan, Gregory 155 
Harlan, Sherry 155 
Harper, Keily A 137 
Harper, Tonya 156 
Harrington, Tyla 156 
Harris, Draine 156 
Harris, Tracy A 122 
Harrison, Bonnie J 147 
Harrison, Erik M 122 
Harvey, James 166 
Harvey, Tursha 156 
Haskett, Brian 122 
Hassos, Karen L 122 
Hassos, Thomas 156 
Hawkins, Sharmon 156 



Hayes, Paul 122, 166 
Hayes, Thomas 122, 162 
Hays, Cathy 147 
Hays, Cynthia R 122 
Heck, Gayle D 147 
Heffernan, Douglas L 147 
Henry, Joyce A 147 
Henry, Ricky D 147 
Hertz, Rebecca 166 
Hester, Lowell 166 
Hewlett, Henry H 147 
Hewlett. Shawn 156 
Hewlett, Sheena 156 
Hibbert, Jacqueline S 122 
Hickman, Vicky A 122 
Hicks, Michelle 147 
Hidalgo, Juan 122 
Higgs, Robin L 122 
Hightshoe, James A 122 
Hill, Greagory 122 
Hill, Jeffery 156 
Hill, Lisa M 122 
Hill, Sheila 156 
Hill, Wade 156 
Hilliard, Tawana M 122 
Hinman, Cathy L 137 
Hinote, Tammy G 147 
Hinton, Peggy A 122 
Hobbs, Jeffrey R 122 
Hobbs, Melissa 156 
Hobbs, Steven R 122 
Hoffman, Robert L 86, 123 
Hoffs, Janice 166 
Hogan, Steven 123 
Holden, Scott L 123 
Holifield, William 156 
HOME ECONOMICS 68 
Honeycutt, Claude M 147 
Hoover, Alan J 123 
Hoover, Deborah A 123 
Hopkins, Peter W 137 
Horton, Rebecca G 123 
Hoskins, Anthony W 123 
Houck, Kenneth C 156 
Houston, Derrick T 33, 123 
Houston, Floyd E 147 
Howard, Carlos A 137 
Howard, Gina M 147 
Howard, Lawanna 156 
Howard, Lisa M 123 
Howard, Marvin C 33 
Howcott, John 156 
Howcott, Paul L 123 
Hubbard, Bobby 137 
Hubbard, Terri 156 
Hubbard, Tina M 123 
Hubbard, Tracei L 147 
Hudson, David A 137 
Hudson, Karl A 123 
Hudson, Monica J 137 
Hudson, Shan 123 
Hughes, Lori L 147 
Hughes, Stephanie A 147 
Hunt, Amy S 12, 123 
Hunt, Daniel 156 
Hunt, Kevin D 123 
Hunt, Monique R 147 
Hupp. Anthony 76, 137 
Hupp, Theresa L 147 
Hurd, Anthony D 147 
Hurd, Derrick M 137 
Hurst, Jerry 166 
Hurt, Stanley 123 
Huston, Paul 123 



Hutchison, Sandra C 55, 137 
Hutzler, Kristie L 137 
Hutzler, Michael J 80 

I 
IMC 52, 53 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS 76-77 
Ingram, Bryant A 147 
Irvine, Keith W 123 
Irwin, Cheryl V 137 
Isaacs, Debbie 156 

J 
Jackson. Arnold 123 
Jackson, Derrick 123 
Jackson, Felicia D 137 
Jackson Jr. Clarence 156 
Jacob, Larry J 137 
Jacobs, Joseph 40, 50, 156 
Jacobs, Samuel L 46, 123 
James. Linda 166 
Jarosinski, Joseph 40, 156 
Jarosinski, Mark 123 
Jarosinski, Michael P 123 
Jarosinski, Rita C 137 
Jefferson, Sandra K 137 
Jeffries. Debra K 147 
Jenkins. Brenda S 12, 45, 123 
Jenkins, Phyllis E 123 
Jennings, Angela 156 
Jennings, Lisa 156 
Jessup, Marcus D 123 
Johannessen, Marilyn 163 
Johnson, Angela A 137 
Johnson. Barbara A 137 
Johnson, Darryl L 
Johnson, Daniel 166 
Johnson, David 166 
Johnson, Detra E 148 
Johnson. Douglas H 123 
Johnson, Kenneth 156 
Johnson, Kimberley 123, 137 
Johnson, Linda M 137 
Johnson, Penny 156 
Johnson, Penny S 148 
Johnson, Robin 45, 123 
Johnson, Sharon A 137 
Johnson, Thonya 124 
Johnson, Tonia 156 
Jones, Cassandra 68 
Jones, David N 156 
Jones, Fred 162 
Jones, Jerry 157 
Jones, Jill 157 
Jones, Joanne P 137 
Jones. Keith 10, 22, 123 
Jones, Kimberly D 137 
Jones, Marilyn M 148 
Jones, Mary S 148 
Jones, Thomas L 137 
Jones, Timothy D 137 
Jones, Venus D 148 
Jones, Yolanda R 148 
Jordan, David W 125 
Jordan, Laura M 137 
Judd, Michael W 137 
Julian, Ralph 157 
Justice. Paul 166 

K 
Kampf, Judith L 138 
Kane, Christopher 138 
Keith, Sandra D 45, 124 
Kelle, Cheryl 148 
Kelle, Kevin 157 
Keller, Vicki L 149 
Kelly, Jacqueline 45, 124 



Index 179 



Kelly, Michael 157 
Kemp, Rhonda S 138 
Kennedy, Katrina R 45, 124 
Kennington, Donna L 45, 124 
Kent, Rhonda R 45 
Kerr, Jayne S 45, 124 
Kesic, Kristina 157 
Kett, Edward 33, 124 
KEY CLUB 100, 101 
Killebrew, David 157 
Killebrew, Linda R 138 
Kinchlow, Tammi M 148 
King, Barbara D 138 
King, Brian 157 
King, Christina j 148 
King, David J 132 
King, Kellie L 45 
King, Kevin G 138 
King, Ronald A 148 
Kinser, Jom 43, 157 
Kinser, Robert B 138 
Kipp, Leslie A 148 
Kirk, Evan B 148 
Klutey, Cynthia 138 
Kocher, Cindy L 138 
Kress, Rene 157 
Kuhn, Jeanmarie 43, 138 

L 
Lacy, Charles W 138 
Lacy, Howard J 57, 148 
Lacy, Steven 157 
Lake, Curtis D 138 
Lake, Vennessa 45, 124 
Lamb, Russell 166 
Lambirth, Irene J 149 
Lambirth, Lance 157 
Laners, Eva R 124 
Laners, Johnny 148 
Langford, Randall J 124 
Langford, Shana 157 
LANGUAGE CLUBS 92, 93 
Lauderdale, Kevin D 148 
Lawley, Leo 124 
Leach, Anthony 157 
Leakeas, Christine 43 
Lee, Cheryl A 45, 124, 149 
Lee, Joseph C 124 
Lee, Julie 124 
Lee, Malinda A 138 
Lee, Tuanita J 123 
Lepscum, Jerilyn M 124 
Lepscum, Melinda K 149 
Leslie, Sherry L 124 
Lessley, Edward D 49, 124 
Lester, Lisa 157 
Lewis, Daniel D 138 
Lewis, William 124 
Lightle, Julia A 45, 124 
Lightle, Penny 125 
Lillicotch, Karen R 138 
Lindauer, Belinda A 45, 125 
Lindauer, Debra K 45, 125 
Lindauer, Kathleen S 148 
Litsey, Andrea J 45, 125 
Little, Carmen Y 148 
Little, Judith 157 
Lloyd, Pamela S 45, 125 
Logsdon, Nicholas 169 
Lonis, Jeanette 45, 125 
Lonis, Timothy R 148 
Lopez, Clifford 138 
Louis, Jessica L 125 
Loy, Julie 157 
Luras, Sandra 167 




Luessow, Karen L 148 
Lukich, Michael J 125 
Lummis, John D 138 
Lummis, Lisa 157 
Lutocka, Debra L 43, 148 
Lutocka, Elisabeth A 43, 125 
Lynch, George K 138 
Lynch, Jewel E 43, 157 
Lyvers, Gayle 148 

M 
Mabry, Sherri A 148 
Madden, Lamargo 148 
Major, Nan A 125 
Majors, Thomas 125 
Mangine, Brenda M 139 
Manson, Sabrina D 138 
Marsden, Robert 157 
Marsden, Tonya I 125 
Marsh, Paula 43, 157 
Marsh, Richard A 125 
Martin, Brian P 78, 125 
Martin, Cynthia R 125 
Martin, Michael F 40, 157, 148 
Mason, John 148 
MATH 58, 59 
Matlock, James 125 
Matthews, Carlita R 138 
Matthews, Julie L 138 
Matthews, Michael 33, 148 
May, Linda 157 
Mayes, Rhonda L 138 
Mays, Sebrina R 138 
McBride, Landon H 125 
McCall, James J 138 
McCall, Russell 157 
McCallister, Carolyn M 125 
McCarty, David V 125 
McCool, George 123, 164 
McCoy, Mark A 33, 40, 148 
McCoy, Tonya 138 
McCurry, Michael 138 
McDonald, Debra K 43, 148 
McDonald, Lu Ann 125 
McDonald, Virginia 163 
McDowell, Stephanie 148 
McFarland, Christine S 125, 148 
McFarland, Lori L 43 
McGarr, Bonnie J 125, 138 
McGill, Larry E 125 
McGillem, David 157 
McGillem, Melissa W 58, 139 
McGinley, Susan E 139 
McKeller, Marie 167 
McKnight, Cheryl 157 
McMillan, Timothy B 86, 139 
McNeal, Joy L 148 
McPherson, Katherine 157 
McPherson, Linda S 125 
McVea, Jerrell L 157 
McWilliams, Steven 157 
Meals, Anthony 125 
Means, Donald G 139 
Means, Gail R 125 
Means, Gary L 148 
Means, Vonda 157 
Medford, Thomas M 125 
Melling, Trinna J 126 
Mendenhall, Holly J 148 
Mendenhall, James A 139 
Meranda, Helen 169 
Merriweather, Clayton 157 
Merriweather, Keith 126 
Mesiana, Joseph A 126 
Meurer, Robert 167 



Meyer, Michael J 126 

Micheels, Denise 157 

Mike, Valerie D 149 

Miller, Betty 157 

Miller, Cheryl L 139 

Miller, Cynthia J 126 

Miller, Debbie 157 

Miller, Linda M 139 

Miller, Mary J 86, 139 

Miller, Melissa K 139 

Miller, Rhonda 157 

Miller, Roger 158 

Miller, Sherri 158 

Miller, Stephen L 149 

Miller, Sue A 158 

Miller, Yvette D 126 

Miller, Yvonne D 126 

Mitchell, Christie L 139 

Mitchell, David J 126 

Mix, Darrell A 126 

Mobley, Barbara J 45, 126, 163 

Mobley, Patrick J 136 

Moffitt, James 158 

Moffitt, Jeffery L 136 

Mogollon, Carlos 32, 33, 40, 149 

Montgomery, Charles 149 

Montgomery, Dwayne 158 

Moon, Donald D 55, 139 

Moore, Joyce J 126 

Moore, Lester F 139 

Moore, Linda S 139 

Moore, Mark A 126 

Moore, Mark A 126 

Moore, Stanley 158 

Moore, Terry L 139 

Moore, Yvonne 43, 158 

Morgan, Edward E 139 

Morgan, Jeffrey L 149 

Morgan, Sharon K 149 

Morris, Cheryl K 48, 139 

Morris, Craig A 149 

Morris, Leanne M 126 

Morris, Michael L 158 

Morris, Timothy J 139 

Morrow, Charlotte A 149 

Mosley, Michelle Y 149 

Moulder, Gail L 139 

Mozingo, Wendell 167 

Mulcahy, Michael A 6, 12, 33, 126 

Mullins, Larry E 126 

Murff, Jesse 149 

Murphy, Julie K 139 

Murphy, Lisa 158 

Murphy Jr, Thomas 33 

Murray, Kelvin L 126 

Murray, Valerie K 126 

Murrell, Edward L 149 

Murry, Angelene 149 

Muse, Lynet L 149 

Muse, Valeeda R 139 

Musgrave, Wendy G 139 

Myers, Stephanie 126 

N 
Nance, Wavie C 126 
Napper, Lisa K 139 
Navarro, George 158 
Navarro, Norma 70 
Neal, Judith L 149 
Neal, Madonna S 126 
Neal, Sheryl A 139 
Nell, Ryan 158 
Nelson, Ruth 163 
Neville, Maureen 149 
Nevilles, Mark 158 



Newby, Linda G 126 
Newell, Debra 158 
Newell, Pamela 149 
Newell, William B 126 
Newman, Jacquelyn S 139 
Newman. Jeffery A 76, 127 
Newson, Cheryl 158 
Nichols, Ernest 127 
Nicholson, Marvolene 167 
Nickell, Michelle 43 
Nolin, Crystal 158 
Nolin, Lorri E 139 
Norris, Alan 167 
Novotny, April R 139 
Novotny, Jill M 127 
Novotny, Shari L 149 
Nowosielski, John T 149 
Nugent, Timothy B 64, 139 


O'Neal, Michael 158 
O'Brien, Carrie 149 
O'Connor, Rebecca S 139 
OFFICE ASSISTANTS 169 
O'Keefe, Joel P 127 
Olson, Gary B 127 
Opel, Jeffrey W 127 
Opel, Mark K 33, 40, 149 
ORCHESTRA 86 
Osborne, Mark 149 
Oho, David 167 
Outlaw, Gregory L 127 
Outlaw, Michael D 140 
Owings, Gretta 127 
Owsley, Rochelle 167 

P 
Packwood, Susan 167 
Paff, Doug H 127 
Paicely, Genyce 33 
Paicely, Trent R 140 
Palenik, Lynn 168 
Palmer, Jennifer 158 
Parker, Bernadett A 127 
Parker, Margaret 140 
Parks, Kerry L 140 
Parnell, Tony A 149 
Parrott, Edward C 127 
Paslay, Bryan 158 
Pate, Aaron 127 
Patrick, Carolyn D 127 
Patrick, Gregory 140 
PATRIOTS ON PARADE 84, 85 
Patterson, Torre 140 
Patton, George T 140 
Payton, Carolyn 169 
Pearson, Derrick 140 
Pease, Jacqueline 127 
Pease, Sandra 149 
Pedersen, Christopher 127 
Peercy, Deborah 158 
Pennington, William 167 
Perkins, Kevin 109 
Perkins, Priscilla A 140 
Perry, Bryan J 149 
Perry, Kevin 158 
Pettijohn, Brenda 158 
Pettway, Dorian M 149 
Petty, Robert E 149, 158 
Phillips, Charles F 140 
Phillips, David H 127 
Phillips, Harry F 127 
Phillips, Jeanne 158 
Phillips, Ronald E 127 
Phillips, Timothy D 140 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 66, 67 



Pickens, Carl 158 
Pickens, Lucious 140 
Pinner, Curtis G 158 
Pinner, Pamela F 127 
Pipino, Nicholas 169 
Pitcher, Lorie J 127 
Pittman, Kimberly A 127, 140 
Pittman, Marilyn 149 
Plant, Leatrice 127 
Plummer, Debra M 80, 140 
Pollard, Gail 167 
Pollock, Theodore 163 
Ponto, Donna K 127 
Poore, Tammara 71, 150 
Porter, Stephanie A 150 
Porter, Stephen 167 
Portwood, Diane M 140 
Posley, Beverly L 127 
Potts, Jean 167 
Pounds, Mary C 140 
POWDERPUFF 46. 47 
Powell, Anna Mane 150 
Powell, Calandra 140 
Powell, Craig A 128 
Powell, Dennis K 150 
Powell, Keith B 140 
Power, Lee A 33, 150 
PUBLICATIONS 72, 73 
Prather, Jon 150 
Price, Carolyn M 150 
Price, Judd 158 
Price, Norman J 140 
Price, Scott L 128 
Price, Vincent 140 
Pritchett, Susan L 128 
Proctor, Jacqueline 150 
Proffitt. Steven H 128 
Prunty, Jeffrey A 140 
Prunty, Laura 158 
Purcell, Jajuana L 140 
Purcell, John K 128 

Q 
Quarles, Andre 128 
Quiles, Lorrie 158 
QUILL & SCROLL 96 
Quinn, Deyrl Ray 150 
Quinn, Victoria L 128 
Quintero Jr, Edward 128 
QUIZ TEAM 95 

R 
Ralston, Linda E 128 
Ramsey, Doyle E 150 
Ramsey, Terri A 55 
Ranger, Robert S 150 
Reckert, Valeria G 150 
Reed, Gerald 158 
Reed, Gwendolyn 167 
Reinert, Susan 128 
Reininger, Jane 
Reynolds, Jennifer L 150 
Reynolds, Victoria L 104, 128 
Rice, Donetta 158 
Richardson, Cary 150 
Ricketts, Michael 159 
RIFLE TEAM 64 
Rifner, Paul E 128 
Rifner, Peter A 128 
Riley, Jane A 150 
Riley, Peter W 128 
Riley, Willie T 128 
Ring, Edward 163 
Rivers, Shirley A 150 
Rives, Hilda L 128 
Rizor, Sherry 150 



180/Index 



Roake, Mark A 128 
Roberts, Cheri A 128 
Roberts. David 167 
Roberts, Peter A 128 
Robertson, Angelieta J 128 
Robertson, Barbara 167 
Robertson, James 150 
Robertson, Keith A 128 
Robinson, Cynthia 140, 159 
Robinson, Emaryne 159 
Rodeheffer, James 122, 162 
Rodman, Scott A 140, 159 
Rogers, Deborah L 150 
Rogers, Lori I 150 
Rogers, Shelli A 129 
Roseburgh, Felecia J 150 
Roseburgh, Reginald 129 
Rosenstihl, William 140, 159 
Ross, Linda R 129 
ROTC 67, 68 
Rowan, Timothy 159 
Rowe, Terri D 140 
Rowley, Terri L 140 
Royce, Christina K 140 
Royce, Kevin P 140 
Royce, Patrick M 150 
Royce, Sean E 150 
Royce, Susan M 140 
Rudd, Julia A 129 
Rudd, Richard D 129 
Rudd, Stephen 150 
Rudicel, Anthony 159 
Rudicel, Sheila A 43, 105 
Ruhmkorff, Paula 43, 140 
Russell, David 169 
Russell, Edward B 140 
Russell, John d 129 
Russell, Mary L 129, 140 

S 
Sahm, Patricia 167 
Sandefur, Martha J 129 
Sandefur, Melissa 159 
Sanders, Benjamin 122, 162 
Sanders, Cheryl L 140 
Sanders, Elvin 32, 33, 150 
Sanders, Glennis B 140 
Sanders, Patrice E 140 
Sanders, Roselyn 150 
Sansone, Rita 159 
Satterfield, Michael 129 
Sausser, Joyce 167 
Sawyers, David A 150 
Sayles, Cinnita 159 
Schaffer, James C 150 
Scheibeihut, Marie E 150 
Scheibelhut, Rose A 129 
Schlimgen, Matt L 41, 129 
Schrock, Bernice M 65, 150 
Schroder, Roger 162 
Schwall, Debra A 140 
Schweigel, Debra K 129 
SCIENCE 62, 63 
Scott, Johnathan 22, 129 
Scott, Steven 140 
Scroggins, Marc A 129 
Sexson, J Bant 140 
Shanklin, Keith G 150 
Shanklin, Kimberly Y 45, 129 
Sharp, Richard J 65, 150 
Shaw, Dwight 163 
Shaw, Roderick 167 



Shelton, Greg 168 
Shilling, Michael L 40, 140 
Shoemake, Lisa 159 
Shorter, Danny L 150 
Shriver, Jeffery G 129 
Shriver, Stephen T 140 
Shuffitt, Claude 140 
Sicking, Charles J 129 
Sieving, Jennifer 159 
Simmons, Eric D 140 
Simmons, Jamie S 45, 129 
Simmons, Michael Q 129 
Simmons, Phyllis R 150 
Simmons, Quentin L 129 
Simon, Betty 168 
Sinders, Ellen M 140 
Slaughter, Carmine J 150 
Slaughter, Tina J 140 
Sluss, David 72 
Smartz, David 168 
Smith, Anita L 65, 151 
Smith, Betty L 140 
Smith, Debbie 159 
Smith, Deborah 168 
Smith, Donald 64 
Smith, Jill M 140 
Smith, Joan Y 45 
Smith, Larry S 130 
Smith, Marsha A 151 
Smith, Mervin L 130 
Smith, Randall P 109, 140 
Smith, Robert 159 
Smith, Roy 159 
Smith, Shiela K 130 
Smith, Tammy S 130 
Smith, Terri L 151 
Snipes, Tonette 159 
Snodgrass, Dana 159 
Snodgrass, Derrick M 130 
Snow, Darlene 140 
Snyder, Clifford 162 
SOCIAL STUDIES 60, 61 
Soots, Lorianne 150 
South, Michael P 130 
SUMMER SCHOOL 50 
Spencer, Pamela J 140 
Spight, Derrick 159 
Spires, Sally A 130 
Spradlin, Jeff 151 
Springer, Mark A 130 
Springer, Randy G 140 
Spurling, Kent A 140 
Squires, Grant V 151 
Stahl, Matthew 130 
Stanback, Dianna L 151 
Stav, Randy 140 
Steele, Cornell 33 
Steele, Lee W 130 
Stelmashenko, Vitalij V 141 
Stelmashenko, Yurri 141, 159 
Sterrett, John E 151 
Stewart, Brian K 141 
Stiles, Diane 141 
Stiles, Kimberly 159 
Stmeman, William R 78, 130 
Stockhoff, Brenda 151 
Stoe, Kelly 130 
Stoe, Marty K 141 
Stoe, Torn L 151 
Stone, Daniel 159 
Stone, Raymond L 141 



Stone, Terry 159 
Stratton, Joseph 159 
Street, Steven E 159 
Strickling, Kenneth 159 
Strickling, Sandra 159 
STRIKE 106, 107 
Stringer, Carla 159 
Stringer, Penny A 141 
Strode, Theresa 159 
Strong, Catherine 130 
Strong, Debbie L 130 
Strothmann, Robert S 130 
Stuart, Letitia L 141 
Stubbs, Beverly 151 
Stubbs, Christopher 32, 33, 130 
Stubbs, Terrance G 151 
Stucker, Lucynda G 151 
STUDENT COUNCIL 98, 99 
Sullivan, Karen G 130 
Sullivan, Sharon K 130 
Sulzberger, Kurt J 141 
Sutton, Joy L 141 
Sutton, Philip G 130 
SWIMMING 38, 39, 94 
Swineford, Dianna F 10, 130 
Szmurlo, Wendy 159 
T 
Tanner, Rebecca 159 
Tarter, Scott E 131 
Tarter, Tracy S 151 
Taylor, Angela S 151 
Taylor, Patrick A 160 
Taylor, Shelbie 151 
Taylor, Tarsha 160 
Teal, Rick D 141 
Terrell, Efrem 160 
Terrell, Turisha D 151 
Terry, Carole A 131 
Terry, Jean M 141 
Thompkins, Joyce 168 
Thompson, Bryan 160 
Thompson, Celeste R 141 
Thompson, David A 151 
Thompson, Jack B 131 
Thompson, Sheila A 141 
Thompson, Yvette A 151 
Tilley, Judy C 131 
Tilley, Sharon L 141 
Tincher, JOni M 141 
Tincher, Julie 160 
Tinker, Byron 160 
Tinsley, Delia M 131 
Toney, Lynne 131 
Toole, Michelle R 151 
Torrence, Keith S 131 
Torrence, Leon 141 
Torres, Carrie L 131 
Torres, Maria L 141 
Trabue, Nikki L 45, 131 
Trabue, Stephanie L 151 
Trahan, Stephen L 151 
TRACK 32, 33, 34, 35 
Traylor, Thomas J 151 
Tremain, Barbara J 141 
Tressler, Brice 168 
Truitt, Roy L 151 
Tubbs, Michael 160 
Tucker, Catherine 131 
Tucker, Clint E 131 
Tuley, Thomas M 151 
Turner, Kathryn A 45, 131 



Turner, Katriece L 141 
Turner, Roscoe L 141 
Tutrow, Gary W 141 
Tuttle, Donald 168 
Tuttle, Nicholas L 121, 131 
Twigg, Milo E 40, 131 
Tynes, Troy L 141 

U 
Uhlenhake, Jane A 131 
Uhlenhake, Robert 160 
Uhrig, Barbara 163 
Utley, Michelle 160 
Utter, Daniel R 131 

V 
VanLiew, Thomas 168 
Vanatta, Richard L 131 
VanDuyn, Brent 62, 118 
VanDuyn, Todd A 141 
Vardaman, John 162 
Vaubel, Sigrid 168 
Vaughn, James 160 
Veza, John 168 
VOLLEYBALL 26 
Volz, Loren L 70, 141 
Vonburg, Julie K 141 

W 
Wade, Eric 141 
Wade, Gerald 131 
Wade, Isaac J 141 
Walker, Alonzo Boyd 151 
Walker, Belinda 151 
Walker, Michelle D 131 
Wall, Karon S 141 
Wallace, Wendy 30, 43, 141 
Waller, Cindy 160 
Waller, Lori L 132 
Walters, Michele T 132 
Wampler, Carla S 141 
Wampler, Cathy 132 
Warfield, Wendy J 45, 132 
Warner, Vincent C 141 
Washington, Anita D 141 
Washington, Antione 33, 141 
Washington, Byron K 151 
Washington, Greg 132 
Washington, James Roy 132 
Washington, Teresa A 132 
Washington, Teresa L 141 
Watts, Kevin 160 
Weathington, Anthony 141 
Weaver, Jack 168 
Weaver, Janet 163 
Weeks, John M 132 
Weir, Kathy L 75, 132 
Weisheit, Deborah L 141 
Welch, Claris L 132 
Welch, Debra L 132 
Welch, Vernetta 160 
West, Brian 160 
West, John A 132 
West, Kimberly J 141 
West, Krista L 141 
Westbrook, Parrish W 151 
Westerfield, Kathleen E 141 
Westmoreland, Michael L 142 
Wetzel, Jill R 72 
Wever, Kathy J 132 
Wheasler, Rebecca J 142 
Wheeler, Carrey 151 
Wheeler, Doneva S 45, 132 
Whiles, Traci R 142 



Whitaker, Raymond D 132 
White, Christina M 142 
White, Eric 160 
White, Felita 132 
White, James R 132 
White, Janelle M 45, 132 
White, Julie 160 
White, Kathryn E 151 
Whitley, Daryl P 142 
Whitley, Rhonda 161 
Whitley, Stanley 142 
Wildrick, Pamela J 132 
Wiley, Willie 132 
Wilkerson, Angela D 151 
Williams, Aretha 132 
Williams, Carol S 151 
Williams, Dale 142 
Williams, Diahn 161 
Williams, Keith M 151 
Williams, Larry D 132 
Williams, Marcel J 33 
Williams, Marcus D 151 
Williams, Melissa A 151 
Williams, Nancy 168 
Williams, Nancy 45, 132 
Williams, Natalie L 142 
Williams, Phaedra 142 
Williams, Randall L 33, 40 
Williams, Stacey A 151 
Williams, Stephan 22, 33, 132 
Williams, Tonya 161 
Williamson, Gregory C 133 
Williamson, Kenneth D 142 
Willis, Laurie A 151 
Wilson, Dera K 151 
Wilson, Jeffery A 161 
Wilson, Jeffrey 161 
Wilson, Kimberly K 142 
Wilson, Ronnie A 33, 142 
Wilson, Ruth E 151 
Wilson, Wayne E 151 
Winfield, James L 142 
Winfield, Jeanette A 133 
Winship, Donna 161 
Winship, Paul A 133 
Winters, James A 142 
Withers, Christopher T 142 
Wohldorf, Sebastian 133 
Wolf, William J 142 
Wood, Gregory 151 
Wood, Kenneth A 143 
Wood, Michael A 133 
WRESTLING 24, 25 
Wyne, Gary 168 

Y 
Yarling, Julie A 133 
Yates, Steven 161 
York, Victoria L 143 
Young, Chrystal M 151 
Young, Kelly 161 
Young, Kerri F 143, 161 
Young, Mark A 143 
Young, Regine 161 
Young, Robert L 133, 143 
Younger, Robert 161 
Yowell, Janine M 151 

Z 
Zamora, Angela 161 
Zamora, Roderick 133 
Zaring, Tracie 143 
Zerbo, Jane 168 



Index/181 




Not To Be 
Forgotten" 



^^^ ne of the hardest things next to 
starting back to school is bringing the 
year to a close. Patriots look back with 
mixed emotions— at things not to be 
forgotten. 

Although the '80's have just begun, a 
new Patriot Pride has also. Beginning 
with the IPS teachers' strike and con- 
tinuing through the draft controversy, 

arshall's students have been active 
with concern and dedication. 

arshall Law" took effect in a new, 
yet debatable form— you guessed it: 
Room 208. The words "Room 208" 
brought on a dreaded feeling for the 
students; but the Patriots took it in 
stride since no one was really hanged or 
tortured as suggested by humorous ru- 
mors and cartoons. 

"Marshall Law— Not To Be Forgot- 
ten" suggests looking back, but also en- 
tails the anxiety held for the upcoming 
year. The '79-'80 school year has 
started the 80's with a bang— of friend- 
ship, dedication, and Patriotism. 

by Jill Wetzel 



182/Closing 




Closing/183 



T 



he stereotypes surrounding a day 
in the life of the yearbook publications 
staff are deep enough to wade through. 
Perhaps, being on the staff myself, I 
should attempt to clear up all of the ru- 
mors. I decided to write down one day's 
events just to set the record straight 
for all you lay people. 

Beaming with self pride, I set the 
sheets of freshly typed copy on the 
golden colored counter in front of my 
editor, one Pamela Suzanne Lloyd. She 
says nothing to me but merely acknowl- 
edges my presence by a short glance as 
she sorts through a heaping pile of sto- 
ries. 

I stroll back to my seat, intent on 
starting that racy new paperback I bor- 
rowed from a friend. Savoring the pre- 
cious free time, I take my seat and open 
the book and begin. 

Suddenly, without warning, a shrill 
and familiar cry hits my ears. I look up 
to see Pami, hand-on-hips, standing like 
a panther ready to strike. "I need sto- 
ries! I need pictures. Where are those 
lazy photographers?" she slams the 
cabinet drawer for emphasis. "Jill!" 
Pam screams with force. Jill obediently 
appears from out of nowhere. Most 
likely she was telling the typists one of 
her outrageous family stories. 

"What is it?" Jill asks as she at- 
tempts to calm Pam down. 

Where is that stupid social studies 
story?" Pam asks as her fingers fly over 
the paper stack searching for the miss- 
ing story. 

"I don't know," Jill says as she begins 
searching also, "but we've got a dead- 




line tomorrow and no one's written the 
IMC story yet!" 

Suddenly, I perk up, fear begins to 
settle in. The IMC story has got to be 
one of the dullest assignments there is. 
I begin to imagine hunting down the li- 
brarians for information. Endless hours 
of writing and typing. NO! Not my desk 
and I try to conceal myself. I don't want 
another assignment. I begin to chew my 
nails and I notice the soreness in my 
hands from the hunt-and-peck typing 
that we're forced to do. I hear another 
voice and I turn to my right to see an- 
other student hiding under his desk. 

"I've been down here since she asked 
someone to write a story on the custo- 
dians. I just couldn't handle it any- 
more!" The student obviously on the 
verge of a nervous breakdown, begins to 
cry. But somehow he manages to con- 
tinue, "I heard she had two freshmen 
so shook up they committed suicide!" I 
shake my head in horror and my hands 
tremble with fear. 

"It seems they just couldn't handle 
it," he goes on, "she made them re- 
write a story on Mr. Jones three times 
and their minds just went snap!" He 
snaps his fingers in an imitating ges- 
ture. 

Our conversation is cut short as I turn 
to see two pairs of legs standing like 
poles in front of me. Shamefully I crawl 
from my hiding place and stand in front 
of my captors. I bow my head and offer 
prayer for mercy. 

"We've decided you're to do the IMC 
story," she says commandingly. 




"Okay, you win," I say as I gather my 
books, "I'll leave right now." 

As I pass the darkroom I hear strangi 
disco music seeping out through the 
vent. 

"Not so fast," a voice booms, as I 
turn to see Ms. Eberle the yearbook 
sponsor's frame filling the doorway. She 
walks to the darkroom door and pounds 
her fist on it several times. "Cut that 
music and get to work!" she says with a 
tone of authority. She turns to face me, 
I look away. 

"I think a penalty is deserved here 
Ms. Lloyd, why don't we call the other 
editor up here and we shall decide on a 
proper reprimand." Pam immediately 
leaves to get Kathy out of Art class. 
They soon return and the two as well as 
Ms. Eberle shut themselves in her cav- 
elike office. They emerge from the office 
bearing smiles sometime later. Pam 
speaks up, obviously the speaker of the 
three, "We've decided to revoke your 
restroom and hall pass privileges," she 
says coldly as I fall to my knees and 
burst into tears. 

"The perfect punishment for such a 
crime," Ms. Eberle says. 

"Oh, no, please anything but that!" I 
beg futilly, "Not my restroom pass!" I 
become a mass of wretching sobs. 

And so the story ends, a day in the 
life of the Marhiscan staff. Enough to 
make you want to drop your journalism 
class, isn't it? Ah, yes! But fear in itself 
is exciting isn't it! 

-Mark Goff 



T 



here are always many persons to 
thank when a giant project like a year- 
book is finished. We'd like to thank our 
families for their patience, one 
boyfriend for his understanding, and 
our advisor for the extra help. 

Jill Wetzell, Carole Terry, Mark Goff, 
Scott Cox, Mike Martin, Brian Stewart, 
Randy Smith, and David Mogollon per- 
formed "above and beyond." 

Larry Glaze from Herff Jones was a 
big help on details. Brian Gough helped 
with typing and many thanks go to 
newspaper for help. 

Marshall Law— get the job done in 
the best way you can to get the best re- 
sult. We hoped we lived up to it. 



Kathy and Pam 



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